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"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from MLK to David J. Walker

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Junior Board of Trade to speak in Toronto.

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

Letter from Congressman Emanuel Celler to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Democratic New York Congressman Emanuel Celler thanks Dr. King for the telegram regarding the passage of the 1964 civil rights bill by the House of Representatives. Celler also remarks that Dr. King's service contributed to the passage of the bill.

MLK Schedule for November, 1960

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements for November, 1960.

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Arthur McDonald

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King writes Reverend Arthur McDonald expressing appreciation for his presence in Albany. He also shares with Reverend Arthur how the non-violent battle in Albany is slowly fading yet the fight for equality is not over.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Letter from Marshall C. Dendy to the SCLC

Monday, October 23, 1967

In this document dated 10/23/1967, Marshall C. Dandy writes to Dr. King and the rest of the SCLC, enclosed is a check from "A Fellowship of Concern".

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Letter from Lessie Robinson to MLK Regarding Segregation

Mrs. Robinson informs Dr. King of the difficulty in finding a good job in segregated Graceville, FL.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.


Wednesday, September 27, 1961

This program details a 1961 Harry Belafonte concert sponsored by the SCLC.

American Foundation on Nonviolence Board Meeting

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Harry W. Wachtel reports the minutes of the American Foundation of Nonviolence Board Meeting held in New York City, New York.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."


Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

Letter from Steve Delaney to William P. Lampkin

Monday, August 9, 1965

Steve Delaney, Assistant New Director for WSOC, writes William Lampkin regarding Dr. King's visit to Montreat, North Carolina. Delaney thanks Lampkin for providing updates about the visit and also asks for additional information about Dr. King's planned speech.

Letter from Joan Daves to Earl Smith

Monday, December 5, 1966

In this letter, a representative of Dr. King's literary work, replies to Pastor Earl M. Smith regarding Smith's interest in having the F.O.R. Committee in Rio de Janeiro, collaborate on the Portuguese printing of "Strength to Love."

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.