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"A Knock At Midnight"

Sunday, August 9, 1964

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

Draft of Where Do We Go From Here?

This document is a selection of a draft from Chapter VI of "Where Do We Go From Here," which is featured in the book "The World House."

Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Direction of the Movement

The author expresses her opinion about Dr. King and how he should use his "impressive" vocabulary in the right direction. She further elaborates on her perceptions of the police protection, mobs, labor needs, and more.

Letter to Dr. King from Muriel Pettit

Friday, September 13, 1968

A supporter writes to Dr. King requesting information to be used in a research paper.

Notes from S.B. Well to Ralph Abernathy

S. B. Well forwards Rev. Ralph Abernathy notes about several upcoming and current events pertaining to voter registration in the second and third district of Georgia.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

God (Definition)

Dr. King references Schleiermacher as he attempts to define God.

Letter from MLK to Gerald A. Feffer

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King informs Gerald A. Feffer that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Lehigh University. King states, "I can think of nothing that I enjoy more than discussing some of the vital issues of the day with college and university students."

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

Birmingham Manifesto

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama by the African American community and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

Letter from Vilna Torres to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vilna Torres writes a letter of condolence to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King writes about John Mansfield's play entitled "The Trial of Jesus."

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

Saturday, December 30, 1967

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Letter from Mervyn Dymally to MLK

Wednesday, October 25, 1967

California State Sen. Mervyn Dymally (D-CA) expresses appreciation and support to Dr. King for the efforts of the SCLC with Operation Breadbasket in Los Angeles, CA.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

Thursday, June 18, 1964

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.