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Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Monday, July 11, 1966

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King

This royalty statement for the period of January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964 is for the Dutch-language edition of "Strength to Love," published by Van Loghum Slaterus.

Letter of Invitation from Jay Goodlette-Bass to Mrs. Corretta Scott King to the Pageantry of the Peace Prize Award

Monday, October 19, 1964

The Fariyah Agency acknowledges Mrs. King commitment to the movement via her commitment to Dr. King. Additionally, the author requests Mrs. King presence to attend the pageantry of the Peace Prize award.

Spring Mobilization Background Material

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam announces Dr. King as its speaker for their April 15 march. In addition, this document offers background information on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Emmi Kuhnlein to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mrs. Kuhnlein expresses admiration for Dr. King and shares her experiences as a member of the German Union movement. She equates the German working class living conditions as being similar to the slums in the US. She also suggests employing a tactic used by Israel of putting young people to work as a way to resolve slum conditions. A news clipping is attached to further support her suggestion.

Letter from Robert K. Hudnut to MLK about a Monument

Thursday, July 1, 1965

In this letter Robert K. Hudnut of the St. Luke Presbyterian Church offers an idea to Dr. King, namely to build a monument for those that have given their life in the line of civil rights. Hudnut proposes to call the monument "A Martyrs' Monument."

Letter to Monsier Sempe from Joan Daves

Thursday, October 17, 1963

This is a letter stating that Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" cannot be used in any books because Dr. King wants it to appear in his own book first and it cannot be used before a French version of that book becomes available. Any translation and duplication of his letter violates copyright laws.

Letter from MLK to Wallace F. Bennett

Tuesday, June 23, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Wallace F. Bennett, a United States Senator from Utah, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Letter from Martin Peretz to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

In this letter, Martin Peretz of Harvard University, expresses interest in having lunch with Andrew Young, Dr. King and his wife after a Belafonte Concert in Boston.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves informs Dr. King of Harper and Row's efforts on behalf of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." She includes sales figures and discusses the "variance[s]" for the total number of copies.

Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. thanks Dr. King for his previous telegram in support of the discharge petition on home rule for the District of Columbia. The home rule gives some of congress' power over the district to the local government. The petition was finally approved in 1973.

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago asks Dr. King, as a former John F. Kennedy award winner, to write a telegram of congratulations to the current nominee. This year's recipient, Reverend Richard Morrisroe, was shot and wounded in Alabama the previous summer while campaigning for civil rights.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

Letter from Curtis Harris to Affiliates of West Virginia SCLC

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Curtis Harris discloses information regarding Petersburg Improvement Association's sixth anniversary celebration.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, Governor of Jerusalem, writes Dr. King regarding his planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Katib assures Dr. King that he will be well-taken care of and shows sincere appreciation that he plans to visit Jerusalem.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

Mbutta Milando Resume

This is the resume of Mbutta Milando, an Eisenhower Exchange Fellow from Tanzania.

Letter from MLK to Marcia Burke

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

Dr. King appreciates the invitation extended to him to speak for the Ohio Wesleyan University Student Committee on Race Relations, but must decline it.

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter from Dick Smyth to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1963

Dick Smyth, Vice President of the Windsor Men's Press Club, confirms Dr. King's telephone commitment to meet with Detroit and Windsor, Ontario press in an "off the record" news conference.

Letter from Lottie Thomas to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Lottie Thomas, a Negro businesswoman from Alaska, requests Dr. King's help with her business. Mrs. Thomas informs Dr. King of the unjust treatment she has endured in Alaska and of her current financial tribulations.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Sin

Dr. King quotes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr on his perception of sin. Niebuhr discusses the creativity and uniqueness of man with his relation to God.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.