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Press Statement Regarding Crusade for Citizenship

Saturday, October 5, 1957

Dr. King delivers a statement surrounding the civil rights struggle of the Negro community and the appeals for justice to public officials. He asserts that in regards to the Prayer Pilgrimage, there cannot be a citizen whom does not have the right to vote. With the initiation of the Crusade for Citizenship, the citizenship of the Negro has the opportunity to be a reality.

Miracles

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

The United Ministries

The prayer ask for God to help people become stronger in Christ while saving them from the evil and violence within the world.

Letter from 19 Year Old Swedish Boy to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Bo Blideman requests information on ways to join and assist the Civil Rights Movement during his upcoming stay in America.

Joint Memorandum of Intern Regarding the Death of James Reeb

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Unitarian Universalist Association, and the American Friends Service Committee have each established a James Reeb Memorial Fund. The purpose of these funds are to provide financial assistance to those who are personally involved in the struggle for equal rights. James Reeb was a white civil rights activist who was brutally murdered by white segregationists in Selma, 1965.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Frank Emspak, Chairman of the National Coordinating Committee, writes Dr. King requesting SCLC's sponsorship for the anti-war convention. This letter helps track activities of national peace movement.

Letter from Dolly Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dolly Davis, Publicity Director of the John Day Company publishers, writes Dr. King to request his reaction to Harold Isaac's book, "The New World of Negro Americans." Davis asks permission to quote his comments and sends him the advance galleys.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

The Practical Value of Religion

Dr. King writes about Albrecht Ritschl's views on the practical value of religion.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Wednesday, June 2, 1965

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Shaefer that Dr. King will be able to speak in Kennett Square in Pennsylvania.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick

Monday, May 17, 1965

Andrew Young instructs Dora McDonald to respond to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick's invitation to Dr. King. Ms. McDonald affirms Dr. King's arrival date and informs Mr. Kirkpatrick that they must accommodate the cost expense for two. She asserts that it is necessary for Dr. King to travel with at least one of his aides.

Evil

Dr. King outlines his views on evil and categorizes it into three types.

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

Press Release - American Jewish Congress

Monday, March 4, 1968

Richard Cohen issues a statement on behalf of Murray A. Gordon, Dorothy Jones, and Arthur A. Wright. The statement denounces the article written by John F. Hatchett for the African-American Teachers Association Forum.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Taban

Dr. King expresses his concern for Mr. Taban's welfare in Kenya after fleeing Sudan.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Dr. King sends his condolence to Rev. Burtenshaw of the Catholic Archdioceses of Atlanta for the death of Archbishop Hallinan.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Letter from MLK to Abby Seldes

Friday, January 31, 1964

Dr. King dictates a response letter to Miss Abby Seldes expressing his heartwarming appreciation to the young lady. He also expresses gratitude towards Abby's parents for attending the March On Washington demonstration.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Friday, October 23, 1964

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Letter from the Martin Luther King Fund to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

A representative from the Martin Luther King Fund corresponds with Miss McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.