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Letter from Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

The American Ambassador in Anman, Jordan encourages Dr. King to not reconsider his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Despite the turbulent political situation in the region, cancellation of the well-publicized trip would generate "distinct disadvantages" and much disappointment.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA)

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

Invitation to the 118th Anniversary of Liberian Independence to Dr. and Mrs. King

LIBERIA, New York (NY)

The Permanent Representative of Liberia to the United Nations, Milton Nathaniel Barnes, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a celebration of the 118th Anniversary of Liberia's independence. The reception was held in New York in July, 1965.

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965
Minnesota (MN)

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965
Alabama (AL)

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Rauschenbusch on Sin

Dr. King references and outlines Rauschenbusch's view on sin. Rauschenbusch was a Baptist minister and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement.

MLK at the Jefferson County Armory

Tuesday, August 23, 1960
Louisville, KY

In this outline, Dr. King discusses voting and the importance of citizenship. One of the important points, in Dr. King's outline, states: "Political Parties Must Deliver on Their Promises."

Letter from Ann Gallagher to Dr. King, January 31, 1967

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
New York, NY

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Ann Gallagher of the Catholic School Div. of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, was requesting the copyrights for "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," which would be featured in Father Joseph Novak's, "Christianity Today: A Book of Reading."

Letter from Steve Delaney to William P. Lampkin

Monday, August 9, 1965
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Steve Delaney, Assistant New Director for WSOC, writes William Lampkin regarding Dr. King's visit to Montreat, North Carolina. Delaney thanks Lampkin for providing updates about the visit and also asks for additional information about Dr. King's planned speech.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding his recent trip to Mississippi. Kennedy tells of his engagement with the Department of Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Employment in efforts to help relieve the present hunger crisis. The focus is "to provide more and better food" to people with low income or no income at all. He also wants the committee and Congress to pay close attention to this subject and encourages an analysis of the food stamp system.

The Georgia State Senate

Friday, September 2, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Georgia State Senate informs fellow Democrats of an important meeting before the 1966 Primary Election. This meeting will focus on finalizing plans for their participation in this election.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

New York, NY

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Patripassianism"

Dr. King outlines "Patripassianism" .This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy Cotton

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King requests that Mrs. Cotton present a report on the present status and grant of CEP for an upcoming SCLC executive meeting.

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

Letter from Richard A. Russell to MLK about Integrated Housing

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this letter to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Russell inquires about the Federal Housing Administration's decision on the requirements of housing integration.

Letter from Rosemary O'Neill to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
New York (NY)

Rosemary O'Neill of the College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York writes Dr. King regarding Choice '68, the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. O'Neill, Choice '68 Campus Coordinator, requests campaign materials such as fliers, pamphlets and fact sheets to inform students on various candidates.

Letter From Carl H. Pforzheimer to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Pforzheimer expresses his appreciation for an inscribed copy of one of Dr. King's books.

Newspaper Article "Negro Nation Ratified"

Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

This article discusses a group of black nationalists who ratified a declaration of independence for a separate Negro nation. The new nation was named the "Republic of New Africa."

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

MLK Addresses the District 65 AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962
Florida (FL), New York (NY), Albany, GA, GERMANY, Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, FRANCE, JAPAN

This is an address given by Dr. King to District 65 of the National AFL-CIO Convention in Miami, Beach. Dr. King recognizes their contribution to the Southern Christen Leadership Conference.

Letter from the Speakers Bureau to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
Chicago, IL

The Speakers Bureau writes Dr. King as they are preparing to publish a new edition of the Speakers Booklet for 1968-69. They request Dr. King's biography, topics of discussion, a recent photo, and ask his general availability.

Telegram from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL

Talk show host and columnist Irv Kupcinet invites Dr. King to make an appearance on his television panel. Mr. Kupcinet discloses knowledge of Dr. King's visit to Chicago for an announcement on July 24, 1965, and encourages the civil rights leader to appear on the show later that afternoon.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Albany, GA

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.