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MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Monday, July 27, 1964

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

Letter from D. Wesley Slate. Jr. to MLK

D. Wesley Slate Jr. informs Dr. King that the student body of the Southeastern Branch will be participating in CHOICE 68 by Time Magazine and request any campaign literature he could provide.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Wallace F. Bennett

Tuesday, June 23, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Wallace F. Bennett, a United States Senator from Utah, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

Letter from William M. Grayson to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1962

William M. Grayson, the President of the local NAACP chapter in West Virginia, requests the help of Dr. King to assist the organization in gaining more members. Grayson asks that Dr. King provide a schedule and availability for when he could possibly provide aid.

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Letter from MLK to Mr. C.G. Christian

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

Dr. King sends this letter of recommendation, on behalf of Reverend John Thomas Porter, to the Pulpit Committee of Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Following the death of Dr. Goodgame, Dr. King nominates without reservation, Reverend Porter who he calls, "one of the finest men on the ministerial horizon."

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Tuesday, January 15, 1963

Mrs. King sends birthday wishes to Dr. King.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Senator William Proxmire to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

US Senator William Proxmire writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for the Reverend's previous letter regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Tuesday, May 25, 1965

This letter to Dr.King from a supporter emphasizes the need for reform in the SCLC. Particularly with its writings. He tells Dr.King the need for editing grammatical errors on SCLC literature. He believes he has a workable plan to make changes that would better serve Dr.King and the movement.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 14, 1967

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Although unable to send financial support, the author expresses "intense admiration" for Dr. King's leadership and courage.

Democracy

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness" on the subject of democracy.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Marcel L. Goldschmid about a Book

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

In this letter Dora McDonald informs Dr. M.L. Goldschmid that Dr. King will be unable to write the foreword for his book due to an already filled schedule.

Western Union Telegram from Andrew Young to Nils J. Engelesen

In this telegram, Mr. Young informs Rev. Engelesen that Dr. King will accept his invitation to the reception.