Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Los Angeles, CA"

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence Kirkpatrick

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dora McDonald sends a biographical sketch and photograph as requested to Laurence Kirkpatrick.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

Telegram from the Faculty of Howard University School of Law to MLK

The faculty of Howard University's Law School offers to assist Dr. King in the fight against social injustice in Alabama.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

God (Definition)

Dr. King references Schleiermacher as he attempts to define God.

Letter from V. K. Krishna Menon to MLK

Monday, September 5, 1966

V. K. Krishna Menon informs Dr. King of the upcoming International Conference Against War Danger, which has the support of more than 70 countries. He requests that Dr. King contribute a paper about racism to the conference, and he also invites Dr. King to attend the event.

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

Letter from Lou Goldstein to NAACP, February 6, 1968

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

In this letter, Lou Goldstein contacts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to inquire about the location of photographs of Dr. King, Roy Wilkins, and A. Philip Randolph.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil D. Jones

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

In this letter, Wayne Williams, Director of Field Activities at Fair Employment Practices Commission in Illinois, informs Virgil Jones that they have investigated his charge with the Commission and now want to review the information over with him.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Telegram from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman Guyot to MLK

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman expresses concern regarding the SCLC's exclusion of "indigenous people of various political orientation in preparing the program" for the annual convention held in Jackson, MS.

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, February 12, 1966

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Letter from Julius H. Avery to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Julius H. Avery notifies Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta for a conference at the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Mr. Avery further requests that during his visit to the city, he and Dr. King arrange a meeting.

Letter from MLK to Edwin D. Hoffman

Tuesday, December 29, 1964

Dr. King informs Dr. Edwin Hoffman of his inability to speak at the American Forum in West Virginia. Dr. King states that he will be focusing more attention to the Civil Rights and may not be available to speak at many events due to his limited schedule.

The Urban Coalition

Friday, March 1, 1968

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Louis Toney to MLK

Saturday, May 29, 1965

Army veteran Louis Toney attempts to solicit a job with the SCLC, citing military experience, a college degree and ordination as characteristics that qualify him for the job.

Letter from R. C. Woodard to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

R. C Woodard expresses that he is an admirer of Dr. King but wants to inquire about whether he is a member of the Communist Party.

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Freudianism

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr on the subject of Freudianism from "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Goodwin

Monday, August 12, 1963

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's request for Mr. Daniel Goodwin to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

Letter from Mrs. Uvee Mdodana-Arbouin to MLK

Friday, August 2, 1963

Mrs. Mdondana-Arbouin, President of the Women's Auxiliary of the Progressive Baptist National Convention, sends Dr. King the lyrics to the poem she delivered at their organization's recent dinner.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.