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"Louisiana (LA)"

Letter from Marion Logan to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Marion Logan writes to Dr. King to discuss his possible involvement with Project H. "Project H calls for Black America to demand of Congress ten billion dollars now to appropriate for the Federal Housing...that are administered by HUD."

Letter to Rev W. Harold Row from MLK about the Annual Brethren Service Dinner

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

In this letter to Reverend Row, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Brethren Service Dinner due to previous commitments with the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Sunday, February 25, 1968

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Letter from Mr. David Winder to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Mr. David Winder writes Dr. King in an attempt to gain an interview during one of Dr. King's upcoming visits to New York.

Holiday Card from the McKinneys

Reverend S. Berry McKinney, his wife and daughter sent Dr. King this holiday card.

Letter from Roger Loewi to MLK

Roger Loewi wrote this letter to inform Dr. King of his mutual friendship with King adviser, Stanley Levison. Lastly, Mr. Loewi requested for a brief meeting with Dr. King.

Race Problems in Albany

Wednesday, December 13, 1961

In the midst of some very disturbing events taking place in Albany, GA, Edward P. Morgan of the American Broadcasting Company writes this captivating broadcast message reflecting his personal view of the Negro's increasing self-awareness and recognition of its place in society.

Pragmatism

Dr. King documents a J.B. Pratt quote from "What is Pragmatism."

Letter from Annette P. Johnson to Reverend Charles C. Carpenter

Tuesday, May 14, 1963

Annette P. Johnson writes Bishop Carpenter concerning her initiative to seek better understanding of his status on supporting racial equality. Johnson believes that Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" was directed at Reverend Carpenter and other Southern clergymen like him.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

Lette from Morton Sobell to a Friend

Tuesday, August 23, 1966

Mrs. Sobell requests that Dr. King attend the open hearing for Morton Sobell. She also asks for financial support to aid in his defense.

Hegel

Dr. King discusses the Hegelian philosophy regarding man and God.

Letter from Peggy Seldes to MLK

Friday, July 31, 1964

Peggy Seldes thanks Dr. King for responding to her daughter's previous letter. Peggy goes on to praise Dr. King for his I Have A Dream speech given during the March On Washington of August 28, 1963.

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

Thursday, October 6, 1966

Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Telegram from SCLC to Ella Mae Moton

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff of the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program inform Ella Mae Moton that her expenses for the trip to Georgia will be taken care of.

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Formative Elements

From Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making," Dr. King records the formative elements of the temporal world.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Attorney Solomon Seay, Jr.

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Reverend Williams writes to Attorney Seay requesting advance notice, of three to four weeks, for persons appearing in court. He also states that it would be helpful if he would give the dates of the arrests and the charges.

Celsus

Dr. King writes about Celsus, a second century Greek philosopher who opposed Christianity.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

SCLC and The American Foundation on Nonviolence: Proposal for Housing

The American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC set forth a proposal for low cost self-help housing in Greene County, Alabama.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.