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Mission to Mississippi

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

Telegram from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mr. Brown confirms the departure date for the Nigeria Peace Mission with Dr. King.

Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.

Poster: Victory Baptist Church Banquet

This poster announces Victory Baptist Church's 24th anniversary banquet, with Dr. King as guest speaker. Dr. King spoke at this Los Angeles church on June 25, 1967.

Letter from Barbara Dodge to MLK

Thursday, June 9, 1966

Barbara Dodge, of the American Bapist Home Missionary Societies, communicates with Dr. King to receive his input on the possible hiring of Mildred Crowell to serve as a Special Interest Missionary.

SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Tom O. writes Mrs. King attaching an example of a brochure which entails a description SCLC's affiliate program. Tom O. also insures Mrs. King that the color in which the brochure is printed is not final.

Get well letter from Nicholas Altomerianos to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Nicholas Altomerianos, Mayor of Charles Evan Hughes High School in New York, sent Dr. King this get well letter on behalf of its faculty and students.

Advertisement for Mrs. King's Upcoming Appearance

This flyer serves as an advertisement for Mrs. Coretta Scott King's upcoming public appearance at the First African Baptist Church. Mrs. King wishes to honor every Freedom Fighter who was imprisoned during a civil rights demonstration.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband Lucius on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Kendall Bryant to MLK

Sunday, October 27, 1963

A fourth grader from Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia writes Dr. King to inform him of a donation drive conducted by "Mrs. Magaziner's 4th grade class" for the rehabilitation of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The student requests a response letter from Dr. King to take back to the class.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Letter from LeRoy Allen to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

LeRoy Allen, President of Cheyney State College, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker for their Founder's Day Convocation in November of 1967. Allen emphasizes the goal of the college to aid Negroes living in urban communities.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Friday, December 11, 1964

Here Joan Daves gives permission to Mr. Phillip Hanson for the use of words from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", requested by Philip Hanson.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

National Council of Churches

Tuesday, January 17, 1961

J. Oscar Lee informs the committee members of the National Council of Churches of Christ of the forthcoming General Committee meeting.

Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

MLK Writes Rev. Frank N. Williams Thanking Him for Support

Thursday, October 11, 1962

Dr. King writes Rev. Williams and expresses his appreciation for his witness in Albany, Ga. He also apologizes for the time delay of the letter explaining that there was an accumulation of mail in his office. He goes on to say that the work that Rev. Williams has done was very important and will continue to be needed in the movement.

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Letter from Rene Remond to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

The "Centre Catholique des Intellectuels Francais" is an organization focused on raising the consciousness levels of its members through public conferences, debates, and discussions. Rene Remond informs Dr. King that they have enclosed additional information to prepare him on the discussion involving Christians and violence.

Faith

Dr. King agrees with Justin Martyr on faith and rationality.

North and South

The SCLC newsletter informs its readers of the recent events that its members have taken part in. Hosea Williams went to Chicago to conduct a voter registration and voter motivation drive. Also, the SCLC's Operation Breadbasket, led by Jesse Jackson, made an agreement with a big food chain company. The company agreed to transfer some accounts from white banks to struggling Negro banks and to offer its Negro customers products manufactured by small Negro firms.

MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

Friday, November 10, 1967

This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Friday, March 3, 1967

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed

Monday, March 25, 1963

This press release entitled, "King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed," highlights Dr. King's challenge to moderate white southerners to become more vocal against racial injustices.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.