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"Louisiana (LA)"

Operation Breadbasket of the SCLC

How to Win Jobs And Influence Businessmen; a speech given by the SCLC'S Operation Breadbasket, discusses job discrimination and the stimulation of Negro businessmen.

Letter from Leonard L. Smalls to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Leonard Smalls invites Dr. King to speak at the Men's Day Conference at the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, South Africa

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966
Chicago, IL

Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."

SCLC Newsletter: Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany

Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL)

In this newsletter, SCLC announces integration in Albany, GA and believes that the city will soon face the legal death of segregation. They also inform readers of the arrest of SCLC Petersburg President, David Gunter.

Letter from Alfred Martin of the Jefferson Democratic Association to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961
California (CA), San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Alfred Martin, representing the Jefferson Democratic Association, offers his support to Dr. King and the struggle for equality in the south. He forwards two documents to Dr. King pertaining to his potential run for Congress and his ideas to assist Negroes in being able to vote. Martin also encloses a donation and apologizes for his inability to send more.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Pittsburgh, PA

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962
Georgia (GA)

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ferre's view on religion.

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from Joseph A. Campbell to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Joseph A. Campbell writes to Dr. King in request of information on demonstrations as a means of expression.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.

Letter from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Thursday, September 30, 1965
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Gardner C. Taylor sends a financial contribution to the SCLC on behalf of the Progressive National Baptist Convention.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, ITALY, AUSTRIA, Boston, MA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, POLAND, GREECE, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Statement on Warnings Issued by U Thant

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

On behalf of Secretary General of the United Nations U Thant, this letter serves as a call to action for every government, organization, and organ of world opinion to take a firm stance against American military escalation in the Vietnam conflict.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Texas (TX)

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Letter from Nathaniel H. Simpson to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966
Chicago, IL

The West Side Chamber of Commerce, Inc. sends Dr. King a membership certificate honoring him for his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

Sunday, August 5, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The Secretary of Morehouse College Board of Trustees, J. H. Wheeler, inquires if Dr. King will be in attendance for the annual meeting.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Monday, January 15, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Illinois (IL)

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."