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"Louisiana (LA)"

Letter from Jay Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964

Jay Richard Kennedy congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also comments on the importance of international recognition for the current struggle for equality.

Letter from Ben J. Mack to Reverend Andrew Young

Ben Mack forwards to Reverend Young an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the annual banquet of the South Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Temple Sholom Bulletin

Saturday, September 19, 1964

This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Saturday, August 3, 1963

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

Letter from the University of Newcastle to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967

E. M. Bettenson, the registrar of the University of Newcastle, sends Dr. King a follow up letter inquiring his availability to accept an honorary degree.

Stop the War Bring the Troops Home

This brochure advertises a program to rally the support for eradicating the United States influence in Vietnam. It is distributed by The October Mobilisation, an Australian initiative responding to a call for international protest of the Vietnam War.

Schleiermacher (The Original Righteousness of Man)

Dr. King writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view that original perfection is part of human nature.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Letter from Dr. King to Dr. Arland F. Christ-Janer

Monday, November 19, 1962

Dr. King delivered a speech at Cornell College to discuss the problems of racial injustice within the nation. Dr. King expresses his deep gratitude for the hospitality he received during his visit.

Relation Between Eternal Objects and Actual Occasions

Philosophically rooted, the set of notes on this series of cards explores metaphysical claims for the understanding that each "eternal object" is necessarily connected to an "actual occasion." Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and speaks to the actualization of an event as result of possibilities.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Archibald

Dr. King informs Mrs. Archibald of the importance of continuously fighting for peace, not only domestically, but in foreign affairs as well.

MLK's Interfaith Conference on Civil Rights Statement

Tuesday, January 15, 1963

Dr. King shares the significance of three major religious faiths of America, discussing the moral issues affiliated with segregation and the importance of the religious institutitions' influence.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

Sunday, March 17, 1968

An anonymous individual conveys to Dr. King his frustrations with President Johnson and the Vietnam War.

Receipt from the SCLC to Mr. John Henry Kelly IV

Monday, July 10, 1967

This document is a receipt to John Henry Kelly IV for his $1.00 contribution to the SCLC.

Request for a Speaker Choice '68

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Lonnie Longmire, representative of Baylor Universtiy, request that Dr. King suggest speakers that support his presidential candidacy for the Choice '68 project.

Letter to Men of Morehouse from Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays

Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays discusses the events during Centennial Founders Week at Morehouse College for those who were not in attendance. He also informs the Men of Morehouse of the upcoming commencement ceremony.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

Niebuhr, Reinhold

Dr. King references the preface to Reinhold Niebuhr's book, "Reflection on the End of an Era."

Letter from William Caspe and Bruce Fleegler to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

William Caspe and Bruce Fleeger, representatives of the Northern Student Movement at Brandies University, inform Dr. King of their past civil rights efforts with Negroes in the south and their upcoming "Fast for Freedom" event. They request Dr. King's written endorsement of the program and ask that he encourage others to participate.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

Letter from Calvin Kimbro to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962

Calvin Kimbro expresses his interest in famous African Americans and asks for a summary of Dr. King's life. Kimbro also wishes Dr. King luck and success in the near future.

Letter from C.B. Atkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962

In this document the writer thanks Dr. King for meeting with him concerning the proposed "Martin King album" and television series. The writer encloses a memorandum on consumer information and requests King's travel schedule.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Charles Renouvier

Dr. King outlines the philosophical career of Charles Renouvier.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.