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"Louisville, KY"

Letter from MLK to President Johnson on Greenville Air Base

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Dr. King writes to President Johnson proposing the conversion of the Greenville Air Base to a center for training and housing for poverty-stricken Negro citizens of the Mississippi Delta. He urges that the program be coordinated by federal officials and representatives, that action be taken to provide decent housing and nondiscriminatory training programs, and that clear-cut procedures for evaluation be established.

Letter From Ms. Gretchen Johnston to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Gretchen Johnston, a Caucasian Quaker, expresses her support and gratitude to Dr. King regarding the employment of women, integration of schools, and awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

Letter from Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs to SCLC

Friday, December 30, 1966

June Gordon, Executive Director of Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, encloses a check in the amount of $100. She also encloses material listing activities her organization has initiated.

Poetry

Dr. King quotes Shelley's views on poetry from the book "Defiance of Poetry."

Judith Ann Jones Writes Mr. Ralph Helstein Inquiring About Consideration for a Scholarship.

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

College Student Judith Ann Jones writes Ralph Helstein, President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, about the Russell H. Bull Scholarship. She explains how she plans to use the scholarship to further encourage others to be more racially tolerant.

Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists

Monday, January 1, 1968

This document is informing prospective contributors about the Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists. Dr. King was listed to contribute to the publication with "Freedom and Equality."

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Thich Nhat Hanh informs Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta from February 24th to February 29th.

Funeral Service: Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs

Saturday, September 2, 1961

This program outlines the funeral service of Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs. Mr. Dobbs established a number of civil rights organizations in the Atlanta area and was considered to be a close friend and confidant of Dr. King.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

Invitation Letter from Mrs. Frank K. Simms to MLK and CSK to Attend the 28th Annual Coference of the National Association of Ministers' Wives

Sunday, November 19, 1967

Mrs. Sims invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 28th Annual Converence of the National Association of Ministers' Wives in Chicago IL.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

Letterfrom Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College to MLK

Thursday, October 7, 1965

Haridas T. Muzumdar, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences at Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College, inquires if Dr. King will have time to have a meeting with him.

History

Dr. King references a quote from St. Paul regarding a theological perspective of history.

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.

Letter From Carl H. Pforzheimer to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967

Mr. Pforzheimer expresses his appreciation for an inscribed copy of one of Dr. King's books.

Letter from Ethel Harvey to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Ethel Harvey writes to Dr. King regarding her desire to support the Civil Rights Movement. She then expresses her ideas towards resolving tension between whites and black relations.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Plato Psychology

Dr. King explores Plato's contribution to psychology.

The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought

These handwritten notes appear to be a draft of the essay "The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought." Dr. King wrote this for James Bennett Pritchard's class on the Old Testament at Crozer Theological Seminary. Circa September 14, 1948 - November 24, 1948. The actual essay is in the King Archive at Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.

Man

Dr. King records geologist Robert Gheyselinck’s observation about the brevity of human history in relation to the earth’s history

Letter to MLK from Philip L. Estrada about Operation Breadbasket Milwaukee

Phillip Estrada, the editor of the Milwaukee Star News, request Dr. King's presence in support of the Breadbasket Operation. Estrada describes this growing organization as one that has made an impression on Milwaukee. He hopes that Dr. King will deliver words of encouragement to keep the morale up and to show his support.

Poster: Victory Baptist Church Banquet

This poster announces Victory Baptist Church's 24th anniversary banquet, with Dr. King as guest speaker. Dr. King spoke at this Los Angeles church on June 25, 1967.

Letter from Clarita Wordlaw to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

Mrs. Wordlaw requests that Dr. King instructs the New Bern, North Carolina SCLC Chairman to refrain from demonstrations against Negroes. She also informs Dr. King of actions that should be taken to benefit the Negroes of New Bern.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

Letter from James R. Smith to MLK

James R. Smith, the director of the Youth Christian Education Department of Athens Community, inquires if Dr. King can support his program by giving a donation.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.