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Reports of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam

Thursday, July 6, 1967

The International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace issues a report of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam. Within the report, an appeal to the world is made on behalf of Vietnam and a resolution is offered to outline the ways in which a settlement can be reached between the United States and Vietnam.

Letter from Miss D. McDonald to The Rev. Julian J. Keiser

Monday, June 22, 1964

Miss McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, assures Reverend Keiser that Dr. King's recent trip to Los Angeles was a pleasnt experience. Miss McDonald conveys Dr. King's hope that his "appearance, in some way, proved helpful."

Memorandum from James Framer to CORE Group Leaders

Monday, September 25, 1961

Jamer Framer, National Director of CORE, outlines several examples of legal and "extra-legal" harrassment of CORE and Freedom Riders by Mississippi officials.

Self-World

Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Letter from Franz Jonas to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Franz Jonas invites Dr. King to the Vienna Festival to engage in the "European Talk" purposed to promote unity within the continent. Jonas comments that Dr. King's knowledge and experience qualifies him as a valuable candidate to participate in the talk.

Letter from Mr. Burke Marshall to MLK Regarding Political Opinion

Thursday, September 15, 1966

In this document, Mr. Mashall writes to Dr. King regarding issues surrounding the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service. He requests that Dr. King writes on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on matters further outlined in Section 2.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from MLK to President Eisenhower

Thursday, August 13, 1959

This is the text of a telegram Dr. King sent to President Eisenhower regarding the contemporaneous events of the opening of desegregated schools and the arrival of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett to MLK

Monday, September 9, 1963

The American Friends Service Committee is a peace and service organization that seeks to promote social justice in the United States and around the world. Mr. Pickett, a current representative, invites Dr. King to be a part of a lecture series that will be presented in all major U.S. cities. In addition, he offers Dr. King monetary compensation for travel and hospitality accommodations.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, April 24, 1964

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the German publishing house's request for a personalized forward for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Letter from Mike Epstein to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. Epstein thanks Dr. King for his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement and his stance on the war in Vietnam. Epstein considers Dr. King's status as "a man of judgment" an asset.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Saturday, May 30, 1964

After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Descartes

Dr. King references a theological concept by the French philosopher Rene Descartes.

Letter from Robert Maxwell

Robert Maxwell, a member of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, seeks clarification for Dr. King's visit to England.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Queen Fields

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King advises Mrs. Queen Field to contact Mr. Clarence Jones to obtain support for her children.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Letter of Invitation from Elroy C. Sandquist Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, July 19, 1966

In this letter, Mr. Sandquist writes to invite Dr. King to make an address at a luncheon for the City Club of Chicago.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

Thursday, April 4, 1963

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

MLK Travel Schedule

This document lists a schedule of cities and dates for Dr. King's travels.

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.