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Southern Christian Leadership Conference Resolution

Georgia (GA)

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a resolution urging all religious institutions to encourage their members to vote in the local, state and national elections of 1964.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Civil Rights Symposium Program

Thursday, April 8, 1965
Cleveland, OH

This document is a program from a symposium workshop on national and local civil rights challenges.

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965
Atlanta, GA

The secretary of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees writes to Dr. King, enclosing the minutes of their meeting of April 10, 1965.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Letter from Mr. Paul W. Moon to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 17, 1963
New York, NY

Paul Hoon of the Union Theological Seminary, asks Ms. McDonald if the invitation formerly extended to Dr. King has had any change in status.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Werner Schatz

Tuesday, September 22, 1964
SWITZERLAND

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Werner Schatz who has invited Dr. King to speak in Basel, Switzlerland. McDonald states that Dr. King received the letter upon arriving from abroad causing him to miss the date of the invitation.

Harper & Row, Publishers Invoice

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King for the shipment of ten copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Mildred R. Morris to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 27, 1963
Cincinnati, OH

Mildred R. Morris acknowledges receipt of a letter from Dora McDonald. She expresses her excitement regarding the possibility of meeting and informs McDonald about her new rates as a Professional Placement Counselor.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Monday, October 17, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Letter from Matilda Ressy to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Matilda Ressy sends her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New York, NY

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963
Tennessee (TN)

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967
New York, NY

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

SCLC Launches Chicago Political Drive

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

The SCLC releases a statement regarding the launching of a Chicago Political Drive, sponsored by the SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations. SCLC Southern Project Director, Hosea Williams, will head the campaign. The focuses of this campaign are voter registration and education.

Letter from Herman Schuchman to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Chicago, IL

Herman Schuchman writes Dr. King on behalf of the American Orthopsychiatric Association to invite him to their annual meetings in the spring of 1968. The association is interested in presenting a program that involves the issues of war, civil rights and human rights. They request Dr. King share his intellect and experiences surrounding the civil rights issues in the United States.

Birthday Card from Leola Whitted to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Leola Whitted, a member of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Evert Svensson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967
Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Evert Svensson invites Dr. King to speak before the Christian Social Democrats Movement in Gotesborg, Sweden.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Letter from Eva Ban to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), BRAZIL

Eva Ban, of the Brazilian newspaper "Cruzeiro," requests an interview with Dr. King in order to do a story on American race relations. Ban also asserts that there is no racism or discrimination in Brazil.

Letter from Joseph W. Harb to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Joseph W. Harb requests a copy of Dr. King's speech concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter from Henderson Travel Service, Inc. to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 30, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), New York, NY, FRANCE

Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel Service, Inc. informs Miss McDonald of the total cost for the group's trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY, Arkansas (AR)

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Symbolic Mountains

New York, NY, New York (NY)

On the stationary of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York, Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Symbolic Mountains." These include the mountains of ethical relations, practical materialism, indifference concerning poverty, and racial segregation.