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Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

Leibnitz's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert C. Knudson's "Doctrine of Redemption."

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
Georgia (GA), SOUTH AFRICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Letter from George W. Haley to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, January 24, 1968
Kansas (KS)

In this letter George W. Haley extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a public meeting. He also comments on a speech that Dr. King gave in Kansas.

Letter from Carmen Rivera to Mrs. King 4/5/68

New York, NY

Carmen Rivera, a young girl from NYC, writes to Mrs. King to offer her condolences after the assasination of Dr. King.

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Letter from Berry Gordy to Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, July 18, 1963
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Gordy writes to Mr. Walker to negotiate album production and royalty rates for Dr. King's speeches.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gates to MLK

Sunday, June 30, 1963
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL

Bob and Betty Gates write Dr. King enclosing a contribution toward his work for freedom and better opportunities for African Americans. The Gates also ask Dr. King's opinion regarding the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Letter from Patricia Kleps to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Dr. King informs Mrs. Patricia Kleps that he will be unable to fulfill her request to speak at the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco. However, Dr. King pledges to contact her around January of 1968 to possibly schedule a date for him to address her congregation.

Spencer, Herbert

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer's "First Principles" on the subject of evolution.

Letter from John Frankel to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., JAMAICA

John Frankel expresses gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of Sargent Shriver for supporting the efforts of the Queens Clinical Society in South Jamaica.

Racism Blocks Social Aid to Needy

Sunday, November 12, 1967
Denver, CO, SWEDEN

Dr. King writes that overcoming inequality in America will require a "revolution in attitude and values." He calls for a guaranteed annual income and a Bill of Rights just for the disadvantaged.

Letter from Carolyn Martinelli to Ralph Abernathy After the Death of MLK

Saturday, April 13, 1968
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. Martinelli writes Rev. Abernathy in the month following Dr. King's death, encouraging him to continue promoting a philosophy of love and equality. Martinelli identifies herself as a white housewife, teacher and mother of two, who has only known three Negroes in her whole life. . Although she has never known poverty, her desire is for all Americans to know the truth and work to resolve these problems in society.

Letter From MLK to Mr. Berkowitz

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding demonstrations in Montgomery.

Overcoming an Inferiority Complex

Montgomery, AL

The author writes about the psychological condition of an inferiority complex. He references present day college students and various historical figures that have all suffered from inferiority complexes.

SCLC News Release

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release stating Dr. King's demands that the Department of Justice act immediately to halt brutal treatment and intimidation of Negro school children and parents in the State of Mississippi. Dr. King cites several violent and near violent incidents that have occurred in Mississippi during the month of October.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Berl Bernhard

Wednesday, February 6, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Berl Bernhard that Dr. King has a prior engagement out of the country and cannot attend the civil rights planning conference. McDonald states, "He asked me to say to you that he would be grateful if you would send him a copy of the report of the conference."

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Truth

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Introduction to Philosophy." Brightman was a Christian theologan in the Methodist tradition.

Letter from Ed Jennings to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

Illinois (IL)

In this letter received February 7, 1966, Jennings enlightens King on the pro-war and anti-war activities taking place at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Jennings is a representative of the Students for a Democratic Society(SDS). Jennings is requesting that Dr. King reply with a short message which the SDS can use during their anti-war activities.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967
VIETNAM, Maryland (MD), JORDAN, EGYPT

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Brunner

Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner regarding man's knowledge of God.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.