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Nationalism

Dr. King quotes Charles Summer, stating that being "children of a common Father" is a "more sacred bond" than being a citizen.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Wednesday, April 21, 1965

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

Letter from Richard Todd to Reverend Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Richard Todd writes to Reverend Abernathy to provide and informative article regarding media personality and Yale University professor Dr. Albert E. Burke.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

Letter from MLK to Marguerite Priolean

Sunday, October 6, 1963

Dr. King is invited to speak at Cheyney State College in Pennsylvania by Mrs. Marquerite Priolean. However, Dr. King must deny the request due to the excessive amount of speaking engagements already placed on his calendar.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Document Cover Page

Monday, January 15, 1968

This document, dated January 15, 1968, from Johnson Publishing Company is a cover page titled "For Dr. King."

Letter from a Concerned Christian to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1958

This letter penned by "Concerned Christian" informs Dr. King of a change in the course of the Civil Rights Movement. The "Concerned Christian" makes note of the increased amount of violence in the city of Baltimore and reprimands Dr. King's "reduced faith in God."

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1957

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

My Dream

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 20, 1966

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee corresponds with Dora McDonald to arrange a date for Dr. King to address the committee. Shaefer provides a list of available dates from which Dr. King can select.

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Kenneth Lee extends his gratitude for Dr. King's sponsorship status for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. Mr. Lee asks Dora McDonald if a meeting can be arranged between himself and Dr. King during his visit to Atlanta, Georgia in August 1967.

Spirit

Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

Walter Winchell: Man Doing A Column

In part of this edition of his syndicated gossip column, Walter Winchell briefly criticizes SNCC in the irreverent style for which he was known.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, April 17, 1967

J.Campe encloses payment from The Critic for "Where Do We Go From Here" permission fees.

MLK Question Response on Ministry and Segregation

This document features Dr. King's listed "Question: How far is the fact that you are a minister involved in your action?" and its subsequent answer. Citing the "church...[as]...the chief moral guardian of the nation," Dr. King uses the example of the Southern Baptist Convention's hypocrisy regarding segregation.

"Insight and Outlook..Negro Road to Power"

In this article, Joseph Kraft discusses the influences of Blacks voting.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

SCLC Report of the Director

This document contains a six month SCLC Semi-Annual Report. The SCLC reports on their accomplishments in the areas of social action, fundraising, education, legal defense, etc. This document discusses the Virginia Christian Leadership Conference, the SCLC Leadership Training Program, and the Citizens Voter Registration Drive. Also included is a list of recommendations for the SCLC staff.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.