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"Lowndes County, AL"

Letter from MLK to Pastor Summerville

Tuesday, November 9, 1965

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Pastor Summerville's efforts as translator for a speech he gave before a French audience in Paris.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to Reverend Allen L. Johnson

Monday, April 12, 1965

Chauncey Eskridge informs Reverend Johnson that he has sought information from Jack H. Young and R. Jess Brown regarding the posting of bond money.

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Sunday, March 14, 1965

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Telegram from W. L. Battle to MLK

Apostle W. L. Battle offers to sponsor Dr. King in a "preaching extravaganza and conference."

Ex-West Sider

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, July 13, 1962

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to MLK about Court Case

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

Chauncey Eskridge, Dr. King's legal counsel, sent this message requesting the signatures of Dr. King's parents on a legal document. The latter part of the message asks for Rev. King, Sr. to trust the expertise of Attorney Eskridge.

Proposal: Pilgrimage to Rome

The Pilgrimage to Rome proposal addresses peace issues for an audience with Pope John. The proposal elaborates on the different aspects of the pilgrimage including political approaches, the involvement of women, arrangements, meetings and more. The proposal also entails excerpts from the first responses to the pilgrimage.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Adlai Stevenson of the United Nations informs Dr. King that their meeting will have to be rescheduled due to his duties as UN Security Council President. Stevenson wishes to converse with Dr. King about issues relating to the continent of Africa.

Memorandum to MLK about Black Power and the Marks of Slavery

This memorandum to Dr. King addresses the significance of black power and the marks of slavery. It also references excerpts from "The Peculiar Institution" by Kenneth Stampp.

Letter from J. Stanley Purnell to Rev. MLK, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1968

The Chairman of the United Health Foundations, J. Stanley Purnell, sends out an gratitude of thanks to Daddy King.

Letter from David J. Dennis to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

In this letter, David Dennis requests a letter of reference from Dr. King, prior to his draft board meeting, so to challenge an induction into the armed forces.

Letter from Gloria Kenny to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Mrs. Kenny encloses her monthly contribution of $50 to the SCLC and reports that a recent recruitment letter has resulted in 18 potential new members.

Sin

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Telegram from Eddie S. Carter to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Carter expresses his appreciation to Dr. King and the SCLC. He also informs Dr. King that he has recently made a contribution the organization and shall continuously do so.

Letter from James E. Orange to MLK

Rev. Andrew Young advises Rev. James Orange to contact Dr. King about a salary increase. As a member of the SCLC, Rev. Orange is assigned a project in Philadelphia and desires to avoid financial issues.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Phale D. Hale

Wednesday, October 9, 1963

Dr. King congratulates Rev. Hale on Union Grove Baptist Church's 75th Anniversary.

Letter from Ralph H. Eaton to MLK

Friday, June 18, 1965

Ralph Eaton explains to Dr. King why he will no longer send contributions to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Donald Fletcher

Friday, November 22, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King offers his deep gratitude to the contribution made by Donald Fletcher. He acknowledges that because of the support of the contributors, the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding an Offer from Protestant Publishing

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this Letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about an offer from Shinkyo Shuppansha (Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd.). A description of an advancement pay, royalty percentage and number of copies are included in this letter.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Letter from Philip Hart to Mr. Glen E. Aldrich

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

In this letter, Senator Philip Hart comments on the First Amendment and Dr. King's future march.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Man

Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Adverse Advertisement Regarding MLK

This flyer questions prominent leaders Dr. King and Robert Kennedy.