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"MALI"

Letter from Paul Sturges to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Paul Sturges invites Dr. King to address the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

Letter from Mary Tumbull to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL

Mrs. Turnbull expresses her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their hard work in human rights.

Letter from Mrs. Elsie Walker to the SCLF

Monday, April 15, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Mrs. Elsie Walker mentions the enclosure of $50 given in memory of Dr. King. She also commits her Church's Service Guild to making annual pilgrimages to Dr. King's burial site in order to pay homage to "our Leader."

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969
New York (NY)

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967
GREECE, ISRAEL, New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

The American Dream

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Judgment

ISRAEL

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI)

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Recent Court Guidelines Concerning Demonstrations

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL

This memorandum outlines recent legislation that permits "street demonstrations as an exercise of freedom of speech and of assembly." Specific court cases in the state of Alabama are also mentioned throughout the text.

Ethics

Dr. King quotes Psalms 28:3, which he interprets as showing the importance of one's intentions and mental attitude.

Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Friday, March 17, 1967
New York (NY)

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

MLK's Index Card Referencing Bertrand Russell

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bertrand Russell's views on man.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

Invitation from The European Baptist Federation to MLK

Friday, March 6, 1964
London, England, Atlanta, GA, UNITED KINGDOM

A representative from the European Baptist Federation writes Dr. King thanking him for accepting the invitation to speak at their fifth conference. Dr. King will be a guest of honor and speak among Europeans of all denominations.

Harry Belafonte Concert Promotion

Monday, May 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Johannesburg, South Africa

The Belafonte Concert Committee reaches out to Atlanta music lovers for a show featuring Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba.

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Chicago, IL

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

Letter from Vera Galanter to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Galanter informs Dr. King of mobilization efforts in the North to aid in "Negro Voter Registration programs in the South" and requests areas in need of support.

George A. Chauncey request to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967
Richmond, VA

George A. Chauncey writes Dr. King to request copies of the "Annual Report of the President," a speech that was delivered at the 1967 meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of updates regarding the advertisement of "Why We Can't Wait". Joan Daves also discusses a conversation they previously had on the phone and gives an explanation of her actions.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Man

Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Letter from E. Thomas Williams Jr. to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Peace Corps Staff in Washington D. C., E. Thomas Williams, Jr. sends Dr. King a contribution to aid in the work of the SCLC. Williams also explains that many of the donors have made more than financial contributions to the civil rights movement.

The Burning Truth in the South

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Montgomery, AL

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Letter from Alice Cooper to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968
Florida (FL), IRAN, THAILAND, Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Cooper expresses agreement with Dr. King's article in the May 1967 edition of "The Progressive," which discussed the inherit injustice in using "black and white" as names for races. She also sends a copy of an article she wrote that suggests some alternate names.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."