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Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

Correspondence: Telgegram from W.A. Flowers to Dr.King

Friday, September 9, 1966

This telegram from W.A. Flowers is offering words of support and encouragement to Dr. King and the movement. Flower discourages the behavior leaders, such as Stokley Carmichael and hopes Dr. King stands firm to his conviction to better all man kind.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to F. D. Kirkpatrick

Monday, March 4, 1968

Rev. Abernathy commends Rev. Kirkpatrick on his job with the Steering Committee and discusses the enclosure of receipts.

Letter from Rose Auguste to MLK

Rose Auguste asks Dr. King for a list of publishers that are open to Negro work. She is looking for a publisher for her manuscript, which has a "spiritual and supernatural theme."

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from Harold W. Buchholz to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Harold W. Buchholz, a financial patron, provides Dr. King with tips to appeal to more Americans regarding his programs to provide equality for Negroes.

Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Monday, January 15, 1968

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Letter from Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Hugh Scott, U. S. Senator from Pennsylvania, assures Dr. King that he intends to support voting rights legislation and especially the proposal to eliminate the poll taxes instituted as a form of discrimination.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, August 29, 1965

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kirkcaldy

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King responds to Lester Kirkcaldy's letter inquiring about Dr. King's availability to speak at the National Conference of Citizens Associations in Jamaica. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his previous arrangements to be in Africa and Europe during that time.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from Lawrence Guyot to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966

Lawrence Guyot of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party seeks Dr. King's support for the Mississippi election campaign.

Letter from Ragnar Forbech to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ragnar Forbech, Chairman of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR), responds to a previous letter from Dr. King. Dr. King declined the invitation to speak at the IFOR Conference due to of his busy schedule, but Forbech notes from their earlier correspondence that Dr. King will keep his organization in mind for the future. Forbech also congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

Letter from Mount Olive Baptist Church to the SCLC

Saturday, October 5, 1963

The Mount Olive Baptist Church of Sharpsburg express their appreciation and support of the SCLC's nonviolent movement. The church encloses a check and hopes that the organization will maintain clarity in the progression of a "true democracy."

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

Thursday, June 11, 1964

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 23, 1965

This statement from Dr. King?s literary agent reflects monies earned from the German pocketbook edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding an Outstanding Balance

Wednesday, January 23, 1963

Mr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King of the new student dormitory and inquires about a donation to pay for the cost to furnish one room.

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.