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"MALI"

Religious Experience

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and G. K. Chesterton on the need for trying the Christian experiment to have the Christian experience.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Letter from Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild

Monday, January 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

This letter is an invitation from Rabbi Rothschild to the Eighteenth Annual Institute for the Christian Clergy. Throughout the letter the Rabbi outlines the activities of the day and expresses his appreciation for all who will attend.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962
INDIA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

Letter To Mr. Kennady From Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, January 4, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter to Mr. Kennady, Miss Dora McDonald informs him that Dr. King is happy to grant permission to mimeograph copies of his article entitled " A New King Of Power".

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958
New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Letter from Howard Moore Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Mr. Moore, of the Atlanta law firm Hollowell, Ward, Moore & Alexander, congratulates Dr. King on receiving of the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes on to encourage Dr. King and the SCLC to "establish a full fledge non-sectarian four year college and graduate school."

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
FINLAND, Chicago, IL, Stockholm, Sweden, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961
INDIA, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Letter from Paul Stagg to MLK

Monday, April 22, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Paul Stagg, Program Director of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, invites Dr. King to attend their convention along with a delegation of pastors from around the country. One of the highly anticipated sessions of the convention centers around the theme, "The Gospel in a World of Revolution."

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter from Richard V. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962
Florida (FL)

Mr. Richard Moore invites Dr. King to speak at the Baccalaureate Commencement of Bethune-Cookman College in Florida.

Subsidized Housing Project Proposal

Atlanta, GA, Dallas, TX

In this proposal for an Atlanta based housing project for low income families, the terms and conditions are drawn out amongst all organizations involved. These consist of Ebenezer Baptist Charitable Foundation, the Federal Housing Insuring Office, the Housing Authority, the Federal National Mortgage Association, Mauldower and Paterson, Joe Robinson and James S. Robinson. Additionally, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. and Jr. are described in a brief biography as reference to the leadership involved in the undertaking.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY), Kentucky (KY), New York, NY

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Letter From Mattie M. Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mattie Patterson congratulates Dr. King on the two awards he has recently received.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967
ISRAEL, JORDAN

Anwar Katib, the Governor of Jerusalem, states that he is pleased to hear about Dr. King's decision to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He also tells Dr. King that his visit will be a blessing and a historical event.

Letter from Alfred Norwood to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Alfred Norwood writes to Dr. King highlighting his experiences as a student at Lincoln school, Berkeley, California.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Chicago, IL

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Letter from Omer Allison to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Allison expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King's representation of the Negro race, the church and the Kingdom of God.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Black Power

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Congratulations Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, January 14, 1964
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Governor Nelson Rockefeller extends best wishes to Dr. King on his birthday and congratulates him for being honored as the Man-of-the Year.