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"MALI"

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1962

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes William James' essay "Is Life Worth Living?"

Thompson Memorial Chapel Program Featuring MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This program highlights Dr. King as guest preacher for Thompson Memorial Chapel's Sunday service.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK about Portugeese Translation of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Earl M. Smith writes to Dr. King requesting permission to translate and publish the book "Strength to Love" in Portuguese. Mr. Smith states that a Fellowship of Reconciliation representative can be responsible for translating.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Letter from S.Leiss to MLK Regarding Dutch Publication Rights

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

S. Leiss sent Dr King this satement regarding a payment for the Dutch rights to "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Robert McDougal, Jr. to MLK Regarding a Donation Appeal

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

In this letter, McDougal acknowledges Dr. King's appeal of October 1965, however states that he is concentrating his donations on other organizations. On the letter there are handwritten comments regarding Dr. King's response.

Anonymous Letter to the SCLC

This anonymous writer seeks assistance from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the removal of Judge George Jackson from the Ocmulgee Superior Court. The author claims Jackson was involved in the wrongful freeing a man convicted of murder.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Jacob Broertjes

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

Dorothy Gaines encloses a copy of all of Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young's expenses while in Amsterdam for the Baptist Federation Convention.

Thank you letter to MLK from Major

Major thanks Dr. King for a good meeting and some great plans. He apologizes for his tardiness due to a delay in Washington.

Celsus

Dr. King writes about Celsus, a second century Greek philosopher who opposed Christianity.

Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

SCLC Answers Attorney General Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Mr. Clayton releases a statement concerning accusations made against Dr. King. In the statement, Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook states that Dr. King refused to give him information him concerning a known communist named Jack O'Dell. Dr. King confirms that he has, in fact, cooperated with Cook and that O'Dell no longer works for the organization.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Photographed Sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt

This is a photographed sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt 1884-1962.

Southern Rural Action Project

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty announces the initiation of its Southern Rural Action Project. The Southern Rural Action Project coordinates local support groups in the areas of housing, voter registration and other issues in the fight against poverty.

The Birth of a New Nation

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Monroe Defense Committee

Thursday, December 14, 1961

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays, the president of Morehouse College, inquires what Dr. King may know about the Monroe Defense Committee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Bogalusa

Antoinette McNally retells the story of a Negro man who was brutally murdered for the alleged rape of a white woman. McNally shares that the story has been kept silenced for forty-six years.

Godm (Micah)

Dr. King refers to the biblical book of Micah to write about Micah and Hosea's similar reference to the strength of the love of God.

The True Nature of Religion

Dr. King discusses the true nature of religion as both an inward and outward experience. The subject "He" is unidentified.

Righteousness

Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

The Second Sunday After Easter

Sunday, April 28, 1968

The preacher begins by reminding the audience about various forms of evil, the church's mission to help humans obtain heavenly rights and other topics from the previous week's sermon. After recapping last Sunday's sermon, the preacher uses the Word of God to answer the question, "How should Christians react to the afflictions they suffer in the world?" The three answers to this question are broken up into three different sections and explained in depth by the speaker.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.