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"MALI"

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Rev. T. A. Borders to Mrs. King

Monday, May 13, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Borders conveys his prayers to Mrs. King, on behalf of the First Community Baptist Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Monday, December 20, 1965
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

Letter from Harold E. Fey to MLK 12/31/59

Thursday, December 31, 1959
Chicago, IL

Dr. King was the recipient of this correspondence from Harold Fey, Editor of 'The Christian Century.' Mr. Fey acknowledged Dr. King's article "How My Mind Has Changed" and raised one concern of why Dr. King didn't mention his stabbing incident, in the article. He referenced Paul in the Bible by quoting Galatians 6:17, "I bear on my body the marks of Jesus." 'The Christian Century' published the article "How My Mind Has Changed."

Letter from Paul Johnson to MLK regarding American Politics

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, Paul Johnson tells Dr. King about how there is a concern about the state of the 1968 elections before soliciting Dr. King's response to a series of questions.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Selma, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Dallas, TX, Texas (TX), California (CA)

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites W. K. Wright's "A Student Outline of Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965
Selma, AL, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964
CANADA

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Letter from Curtis Harris to Wayne Duncan

Friday, January 1, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Mr. Harris writes to Mr. Duncan informing him that the SCLC has received a petition from the employees at their firm. The SCLC accepted
the petition in order to remove segregation and racial discrimination from society.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

London, England, NETHERLANDS, GERMANY

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Anne Eaton

Friday, May 5, 1967
Ohio (OH)

In this letter Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mrs. Eaton's contribution of $500 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King emphasizes the importance of such financial support in maintaining the organization's efforts.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966
Wisconsin (WI)

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Memorandum from Carole to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Carole requests that Ms. McDonald channels several correspondence to Dr. King from those who will participate in a Convention.

Letter from George W. Parker

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA

George Parker explains his theory of mind control as a "mass electronic psychological weapon." He also details how this weapon is currently being employed.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, South Africa, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

The Dilemma of White America

Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Letter from Edward Gulick to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962
Massachusetts (MA)

Edward Gulick of Wellesley College writes Dr. King, expressing his appreciation and admiration for the work Dr. King has done in Massachusetts and elsewhere.

Letter from John H. Scott to MLK

ISRAEL

John H. Scott writes Dr. King regarding his planned trip to the Holy Land. Scott expresses his admiration for Dr. King and seeks to join the tour.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

The Desegregated Heart

Sunday, July 1, 1962

Dr. King praises Sarah-Patton Boyle for her creation of the book, "The Desegregated Heart." Dr. King recommends that everyone reads the book, for it expresses the power of Christian love operating in the human heart.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Letter to MLK from The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Chicago, IL

Emma Kramer, the Secretary of the Speakers Bureau, writes to Dr. King to negotiate the details of his presentation at the University of Illinois.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

Saturday, August 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.