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"MALI"

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 21, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes about plans for a reception and press conference in Bonn, Germany. Ms. Daves mentions that Dr. King may be asked to deliver an address.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Letter from Frederick E. Wallin to MLK

Sunday, March 1, 1964

Frederick E. Wallin, of Alderson-Broaddus College, invites Dr. King to debate Fulton Lewis III. The debate will be sponsored by the Young Americans for Freedom. Television and radio coverage will also be available.

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Letter from Charles L. Allen Sr. to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968

After listening to an address by Dr. King, Charles L. Allen, Sr. extends his support and requests information on where to send a financial contribution.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Henry Luce for the invitation to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine. However, due to another engagement on the other side of the U.S., Dr. King regretfully cannot commit to come to the dinner.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

Happiness

Dr. King outlines insight from philosophers Spinoza and Nietzsche regarding the concept of happiness.

"How To Make History"

Mr. Eisenman acknowledges the irony of how America, which was created after a war of liberation, has now gone against everything it was founded upon.

Van Til, Cornelius

Dr. King cites Cornelius Van Til's "The New Modernism."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Queen Fields

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King advises Mrs. Queen Field to contact Mr. Clarence Jones to obtain support for her children.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Aiken Regarding Housing

Dr. King urges Senator George Aiken and other members of the Republican Party to support an open housing bill to promote better living conditions in Negro communities.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Sunday, September 30, 1962

This SCLC Newsletter includes several articles written by Dr. King and Wyatt Tee Walker. Some of the article titles include: "The Terrible Cost of The Ballot" and "THE CONGO, U.S.A. Albany, Georgia."

Letter From Mae P. Godfrey

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mae P. Godfrey requests monetary assistance to support her family during the upcoming Christmas holiday.

Letter from MLK to Aileen B. Armstrong

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Armstrong for her letter and contribution. He explains the difference her donation will make in the SCLC's efforts to integrate "the Negro into all aspects of American life."

Progress

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer regarding the inevitability of progress.

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

Banner at "Poor People's March," Washington, D.C. June, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Condolences to the Wife of Theodore Trammell

Tuesday, March 20, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker send condolences to Mrs. Theodore Trammell. They make a promise to rededicate themselves to the fight for human rights, just as her husband had done.

Press Release - American Jewish Congress

Monday, March 4, 1968

Richard Cohen issues a statement on behalf of Murray A. Gordon, Dorothy Jones, and Arthur A. Wright. The statement denounces the article written by John F. Hatchett for the African-American Teachers Association Forum.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Jesse Jackson Gets New SCLC Assignment

Monday, November 21, 1966

The Chicago Daily Defender highlights Dr. King's appointment of Rev. Jesse Jackson as head of the Special Projects and Economic Development Department of the SCLC.