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The Dexter Echo: February 20, 1957

Wednesday, February 20, 1957

The Dexter Echo is the official publication of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. The newsletter mentions Dr. King, who was minister of the church at the time, and Coretta Scott King in articles pertaining to their farewell party and Mrs. King receiving an award.

Letter from Mrs. Daily to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Daily seeks to be compensated for the dollar bill she lost in the Lucky Buck Contest and requests Dr. King's assistance in this effort.

Letter from MLK to SNCC's John Lewis Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Dr. King extends gratitude to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, for his encouraging letter upon the announcement of Dr. King being chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King states he does not accept this award as a tribute to himself, but as a tribute to the entire Civil Rights Movement. Lewis was regarded as a key SNCC leader and became the US Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district in 1987.

The Mark of the Hawk

"The Mark of the Hawk" was a 1957 drama film distributed by Universal-International. The film features notable actors, Sidney Poitier and Eartha Kitt. Dr. King states that this movie is one of the "most captivating and moving productions."

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Letter to MLK from Dore Schary

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

In this letter, Dore Schary invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 52nd annual dinner of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith at which President Lyndon B. Johnson will receive the America's Democratic Legacy Award.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

What is the OIC Institute?

This brochure for the Opportunities Industrialization Center describes what it provides for students with the characteristics and training needed to develop an accelerated professional caliber for employment.

Forgiveness

Dr. King provides several definitions of the word forgiveness according to several outside references.

Postcard from Carl S. to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The sender of this postcard informs Dr. King that he supports King's planned trips to Colorado and California.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Downtown Luncheon Club to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from Peter Sevetnyk to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Peter Servetynk, a former Roman Catholic Priest from Canada, invites Dr. King to speak at a massive gathering in Toronto. He further thanks Dr. King for his charitable works and wishes there were more people of his stature.

Memo to Organizations Interested in the Success of the Anti-Poverty Program

Wednesday, July 20, 1966

Richard W. Boone requests Dr. King's support in assisting with the success of the Anti-Poverty Program.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

Revised Grant Award Letter from Otis Roberts

Otis Roberts lists changes to a grant awarded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

News Release from the Presbyterian Office of Information Regarding the CDGM

The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. releases a statement regarding funding for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM). After hearing statements from Marian Wright, the National Missions staff voted in support of funding for the CDGM. Mary Holmes Junior College has acted as the "enabling agency in channeling" money from the OEO to the CDGM.

War and Pacifism

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Telegram from MLK to Honorable Daniel Evans

Dr. King writes to the Honorable Daniel Evans requesting that he intercede in the controversy resulting from Washington State's conservation law and a 111-year old treaty.

Letter from Albert Duff, Jr. to MLK

A former critic of Dr. King pledges allegiance to him after his bold and noble stance against the Vietnam War. Albert Duff, Jr. finally understands that color lines should not be a symbol of divisiveness. Duff feels that the world needs men of Dr. King's courage to speak from the Bible.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Education Heritage

Friday, March 13, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Educational Heritage Company has come to an arrangement about distributing "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." The letter goes on to say that Educational Heritage will pay a guarantee of $2500 against a royalty of 42 cent per copy sold.

Operation Breadbasket Advises Tastee Bread Company on Negro Economic Relations

The Cincinnati and Midwestern Division of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket provides Tastee Bread Company with several recommendations concerning employment practices and involvement in the Negro community.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from MLK to Lillian Robertson

Friday, February 28, 1964

Dr. King apologizes for his late reply to Lillian Robertson of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, a division of the American Baptist Convention. He informs Mrs. Robertson that he will be preaching for the American Baptist Convention as a whole, so he will be unable to speak to the Fellowship in a smaller setting.