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Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Style

Dr. King references Voltaire and his views regarding the impact of the style in which one chooses to express himself.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

Letter from Alversia Dunkley to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mrs. Dunkley writes Dr. King hoping to receive permission to publish her song, "Man of God," about Dr. King. She also requests contact information for the family of "Miss Viola" to receive permission to publish a poem entitled "Viola."

Pantheism Versus Living God

Here Dr. King sketches out his views on "...the Biblical idea of the 'Living God,'" and the substitution of Christ for God "as far as piety is concerned."

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Walter E. Fauntroy

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. Walter E. Fauntroy of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C. for a monetary contribution. Dr. King also explains how the money will help the SCLC work towards racial unity.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Religion

Dr. King writes about the role of religion as an ideal and as a unifying force.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

Letter from A High School Student

A white high school student writes Dr. King to encourage the continuation of demonstrations to free the Negro people.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Letter from Constance A. Price to David J. Hahn

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Constance Price informs David Hahn, Colorado State Senator, of how she has suffered for the past twelve years due to the violation of her constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Workman's Compensation Act of Colorado.

Report from Morehouse College President to the Board of Trustees

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this report Hugh M. Gloster, the new President of Morehouse College presents his report to the Board of Trustees for the 1967-68 academic school year. In this report he addresses daily activities of the college, student body, new programs, enrollment, college faculty, grants and incentives received by Morehouse. He also addresses the goal for the college to raise 11 million by the year 1970 for its endowment.

Prophet

Dr. King defines prophet.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Yankowski to MLK

Monday, July 4, 1966

Mr. and Mrs. Yankowski of New York inform Dr. King of their plan to open a museum for junior high students featuring Americans of great importance. They request a collection Dr. King's past articles and photographs to be highlighted in the museum.

Letter from W. A. Visser't Hooft to MLK

Wednesday, October 27, 1965

W. A. Visser't Hooft invites Dr. King to participate in the World Conference on Church and Society in Geneva, Switzerland. He provides a list of details about the conference, including the time already spent planning it and who will attend, to assist Dr. King in making his decision.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Rev. Roland de Corneille of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Mrs. Joan Daves references an enclosure of two copies of the Swedish-language edition of "Strength to Love," along with an advanced payment for the return of a signed copy.

Notes for Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council Youth Program

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Leaders of the Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council outline a brief youth program to be held one afternoon in the Royle School, in which a video tape of one of Dr. King's speeches will be played for the students in attendance.

Relation Between Esthetics and Science

Dr. King writes notes regarding "The Relation Between Esthetics and Science." King cites several philosophers, psychologists, and scientists, and their different theories regarding science, mathematics, art, and esthetics.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.