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Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

To Set Our People Free

This poem by Mrs. Eudora V. Savage is dedicated to the African American veterans of World War Two.

Letter from Andrew Young to Professor G. Kuiper

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

Andrew Young, the Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes Professor Kuiper of Vrije Universiteit expressing his contentment with pair's recent visit to Amsterdam. Young also inquires about the Dutch institution covering the civil rights leaders' travel expenses.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller on Church Bombing

Monday, September 16, 1963

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller comments on the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombings and expresses his sympathy to the families of the four children who were killed.

Letter from Contributor to MLK

Thursday, July 28, 1966

The author offers support for the SCLC but is critical of Dr. King's interpretation of the term 'Black Power.' The author also suggests the formation of a third party candidate for the 1968 elections.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

The Method of Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical thought that attempts to understand the unparalleled identity of human's in relation to nature. Dr. King references this ideology with a handwritten note.

MLK Speaker's Contract

Monday, April 3, 1967

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin.

Letter from Ada Krozier to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ada Krozier encloses a contribution to Dr. King for his work in the civil rights movement and his stance on the Vietnam War. She feels that Dr. King's position is an opportunity to pursue peace and call an end to the war.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

Friday, March 9, 1962

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Letter from Nigerian Man to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

An affectionate admirer writes Dr. King to express his plans to take up studies in aeromechanics at a vocational school in the United States. The Nigerian native requests sponsorship from the Reverend and his organization to assist in this attempt.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

Presidential Invitation to White House Luncheon

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

President Kennedy invites Dr. King to attend a White House Luncheon on the occasion of the visit of Archbishop Makarios, the President of the Republic of Cyprus.

Letter from MLK to Pastor Summerville

Tuesday, November 9, 1965

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Pastor Summerville's efforts as translator for a speech he gave before a French audience in Paris.

Conception of Man

Dr. King documents a passage from Reinhold Niebuhr's work "The Nature and Destiny of Man." He would later cite this work in his essay "The Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr," written during his career at Boston University.

Letter from Joan Daves to Pierre Servais

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Pierre Servais in Belgium, thanking him for requesting the presence of Dr. King at the launching of a new edition of Strength to Love. She informs Mr. Servais that Dr. King's itinerary has not yet been set and that he will receive more information at a later date.

Letter from Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

The Indian organization, Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses admiration of Dr. King's heroic struggle for civil rights in the US, along with his application of Mahatma Gandhi's methods. A bronze bust of Gandhi is offered as a gift of appreciation and a request made for placement of the statue in a children's park.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

Monday, March 11, 1968

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

Notecard- Barth

In this notecard, Dr.King outlines his views on Barth.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.