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"MOLDOVA"

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

Jack Greenberg congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Progress

Dr. King notes and comments on a quote from James H. Robinson's "The New History" on the eternal law of progress.

MLK on Danville and the Problem of Violence

Friday, July 12, 1963

Dr. King discusses his perception of the nonviolent movement, and how the leadership maintains control even though minimal violent outbreaks may occur.

Mbutta Milando Resume

This is the resume of Mbutta Milando, an Eisenhower Exchange Fellow from Tanzania.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter from Mary Whiteside to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962

Ms. Whiteside, treasurer of the Democratic Club of Paseo, Washington, encloses a check to help Dr. King with "organizing and tutoring." The club decided to send the funds after reading a letter one of its members received from Dr. King.

Telegram from Vice Chancellor Newcastle University to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Vice Chancellor of Newcastle University states that they "regretfully understand" Dr. King's inability to attend their engagement due to his current imprisonment.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Schleiermacher (Christianity)

Dr. King cites a quote by philosopher Schleiermacher regarding "the God-consciousness."

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

Letter from MLK to Oklahomans for Negotiation Now

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Oklahoma City extended by Margaret Novitski of Oklahomans for Negotiation Now.

MLK Letter re Harvey Cox Book

Dr. King drafts a response to a request for permission to be quoted in Rev. Cox's book, God's Revolution and Man's Responsibility.

Letter from Dr. J. H. Young to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Dr. J. H. Young writes this letter to Dr. King about slavery, the Civil War, and President Lincoln. He reminds Dr. King that the Civil War was fought not over slavery, but succession.

Letter from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Dr. King urges Attorney General Kennedy to act on behalf of the Negro citizens in LeFlore County who are being attacked for working in voter registration or becoming registered voters.

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Letter from MLK to Newsweek Editor Joseph Cummings

Friday, December 22, 1961

Dr. King writes Joseph B. Cummings, Jr. in response to a headline article suggesting that Dr. King had advocated that Negroes turn to a new ideology in their struggle – Communism or the Muslim Movement. He wonders how his statement on a television program in Cleveland could be so misinterpreted.

Letter from Herman Will, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Herman Will, Associate General Secretary for the Division of Peace and World Order, General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church expresses his appreciation to Dr. King.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Letter from MLK to Senator Jennings Randolph

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to the Honorable Jenning Randolph, US Senator from West Virginia, for supporting passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Mills to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

This letter from a couple in Austin, Texas is a "message of encouragement" to Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, recently appointed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

God in Isaiah

Dr. King cites Isaiah 55: 8,9 on the holiness and transcendence of God and distinguishes this from an anthropomorphic view of God.

Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.