Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"MOLDOVA"

Refinement by Fire

Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Texas (TX), New Orleans, LA

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Index card written by MLK regarding Faith

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's insights on the subject of faith. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for quick reference to quotations, ideas, and bible verses, among other things. Material covered on these index cards includes topics such as theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from Harry Boyte to Celia Howard Casey

Tuesday, August 13, 1963
New York (NY)

Harry Boyte writes Celia Casey, on behalf of Dr. King, to express appreciation for her letter.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Harper and Row is having difficulty publishing a paperback edition of "Where Do We Go From Here? "

Letter from Christena Miscall to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1961
Maine (ME)

Christena Miscall, member of the Student Government Association at Saint Joseph's College, writes Dr. King requesting him to send a personal article for her college's famous persons' auction.

Letter from Annette P. Johnson to Reverend Charles C. Carpenter

Tuesday, May 14, 1963
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Annette P. Johnson writes Bishop Carpenter concerning her initiative to seek better understanding of his status on supporting racial equality. Johnson believes that Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" was directed at Reverend Carpenter and other Southern clergymen like him.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

Proposals

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King writes a proposal to the Democratic and Republican national conventions regarding the Constitutional rights and human dignity of Negroes. King warns the parties that "platforms and promises are no longer sufficient to meet the just and insistent demands of the Negro people for immediate free and unconditional citizenship." King earnestly requests the parties to ensure: Negro people in the South secure the right to vote, an end to terror against Negroes, and enforcement of the 1954 Supreme Court decision against school segregation.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Sunday, April 9, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter addressed to Rev. Martin "Coon" King, the writer--who does not identify himself-- maintains Dr. King is "damag[ing]...the negroes [sic] cause" by focusing on giving them "handouts," as opposed to "improv[ing] their morals."

Invitation from Israeli Ambassador to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965
ISRAEL, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Avraham Harman invites Dr. King to Israel on behalf of the Embassy of Israel.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Letter to MLK from Philip L. Estrada about Operation Breadbasket Milwaukee

Milwaukee, WI

Phillip Estrada, the editor of the Milwaukee Star News, request Dr. King's presence in support of the Breadbasket Operation. Estrada describes this growing organization as one that has made an impression on Milwaukee. He hopes that Dr. King will deliver words of encouragement to keep the morale up and to show his support.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

B.F. Randolph

South Carolina (SC)

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

Letter from MLK to Robert D. Rasmussen

Monday, December 13, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes Robert Rasmussen to express his regret for his inability to attend a Leadership Conference with the officials of the American Baptist Convention at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Thursday, September 24, 1964
Nashville, TN

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Bollinger accepting an invitation on Dr. King's behalf. Ms. McDonald explains that Dr. King will be able to attend the conference in Lincoln, Nebraska, but he will not be traveling alone, so they will need to prepare travel expenses for two.

Class Notes

Dr. King references several biblical scriptures regarding topics of ethics, knowledge, man, sin and God.

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

Memphis, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Letter from Dottie Hughes to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, October 27, 1964
ZAMBIA

Mrs. Hughes, a resident of Zambia, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She informs Dr. and Mrs. King that their efforts are being recognized in Africa.

Religion and Science

Dr. King writes about the different perspectives of the moralist and scientist, saying a person can be both.

MLK's Speaking Itinerary

JAMAICA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL), Ohio (OH), Virginia (VA)

This list of speaking engagements documents Dr. King's busy schedule, in June 1965.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

Thursday, August 1, 1963
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA, Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Terrell County, GA, Jacksonville, FL, Florida (FL), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Greenwood, MS, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN), South Carolina (SC), Alabama (AL), St. Augustine, FL, Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), California (CA), Oregon (OR), Pennsylvania (PA), GERMANY, Washington (WA), Nevada (NV), Arizona (AZ), New Mexico (NM), Utah (UT), KENYA, London, England, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, North Carolina (NC)

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

American Labor Problems

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In an assessment of American labor,Dr. King poses the question, "are we as concerned for human values and human resources as we are for material and mechanical values?" Furthermore, he declares the necessity of legislative, political, and social action to rectify such failings of American society.