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Letter from Ed Jennings to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

Illinois (IL)

In this letter received February 7, 1966, Jennings enlightens King on the pro-war and anti-war activities taking place at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Jennings is a representative of the Students for a Democratic Society(SDS). Jennings is requesting that Dr. King reply with a short message which the SDS can use during their anti-war activities.

Letter from Stan Brooks to MLK

Monday, June 1, 1964
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Stan Brooks, of Wins Radio 1010, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude and enjoyment concerning Dr. King's appearance on a recent broadcast.

SCLC Staff Salary Sheet

Thursday, March 9, 1967

This document is a 1967 suggested salary scale for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference staff.

Remarks by MLK in Acceptance of the Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), EGYPT, GHANA, Washington, D.C.

In his acceptance speech for the Spingarn Medal, Dr. King remarks about the need for continuing the fight for social justice and equality around the world. He acknowledges the work of NAACP along with protesters as they continue to be on the frontline in addressing the nation's social ills.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Letter from MLK to Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Montand of France, for his financial contribution as well as his personal support for the success of the movement in the United States.

Editorial- "Lawlessness Means Bloodshed, End of Dreams"

Missouri (MO), California (CA)

In this article, light heavy-weight boxing champion Archie Moore discourages black Americans from resorting to "lawlessness" in their attempts to advance the cause of civil rights.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Ohio (OH), New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter From MLK Concerning the Sustainability of SCLC

Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Mississippi (MS)

Addressing the recipients of this letter as "Friends", Dr. King shares the triumphs and struggles of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference while on its continuous quest for civil rights. He concludes the message by encouraging readers to contribute support to this "urgent moral crusade".

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Lebbano and Mr. Mayle

Dr. King drafts a handwritten response letter. He informs the recipients of his pressing commitment to social justice.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Letter from Matilda Ressy to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Matilda Ressy sends her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Beverly A. Asbury

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Tennessee (TN)

In this letter Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rev. Beverly Asbury for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He stresses the importance of supporters' contributions in order to successfully continue the initiative toward unity, justice, and equality.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Letter from MLK to Paul Andrews

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Andrews' commitment to racial justice and expresses gratitude for his encouraging letter. Dr. King states that the most important contribution to justice anyone can make is a "thorough examination" of one's own behavior.

People in Action: The Solid Wall Cracks

Friday, March 22, 1963
Albany, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

In this draft of an article for the April 13, 1963 New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the cracks in the wall of segregation in Albany, GA: first the city’s closure of segregated public facilities to avoid protests by the Albany Movement, then the repeal of segregation from the city’s code.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

EGYPT, GREECE, CHINA, FRANCE, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
CANADA

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Educational Conference Program 1967

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King serves as a guest speaker at a conference sponsored by The Allied Educational Foundation. This program outlines the itinerary for the event including the presentations of other speakers namely Max Lerner, Harrison E. Salisbury, Senator Gale W. McGee, and Stanley Levey.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, January 24, 1968
New York, NY, CANADA

Joan Daves contacts Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding the payment from the Canadian Broadcasting series in the amount of $5,000. Daves further discusses the galley of lectures that are to be checked and released by Dr. King for publication in Canada. In addition to Dr. King, Stanley Levison will also be reviewing the galleys.

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Letter from Eunice Janousek to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963
Washington, D.C., South Dakota (SD), Missouri (MO)

Eunice Janousek requests that Dr. King review materials in the matter of the Blakey case with the hope that he can provide assistance to those who are being oppressed in South Dakota.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Boston, MA

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Letter from Frances L. Lucas to MLK

Monday, July 23, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Albany, GA

Frances L. Lucas writes Dr. King concerning the actions taken to end segregation in a community in Albany, Georgia. Lucas also apologizes for not responding to Dr. Kings formal letter.

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Letter to MLK from Immaculate Heart College

Saturday, October 31, 1964
Los Angeles, CA

Sister Mary Williams, President of the Immaculate Heart College, congratulates Dr. King on behalf of her faculty and students on his selection to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, FRANCE, VIETNAM, INDONESIA

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Judaism (View of Jesus)

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to the "Jewish Encyclopedia."

Letter from MLK to Margaret Archibald

California (CA)

Dr. King informs Mrs. Archibald of the importance of continuously fighting for peace, not only domestically, but in foreign affairs as well.