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Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Invitation to MLK from London Methodist Youth Organization

Monday, May 15, 1967

Greater London Youth and Community Service invites Dr. King to participate in a London to Canterbury Pilgrimage by leading a study on human rights and the church and preaching a sermon.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers

Harvest House Limited, a publishing company, announce the release of Henry David Thoreau's essay collection regarding anti-slavery and reform.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King quotes "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy."

Letter from Toyozo Takata to MLK

Toyozo Takata writes Dr. King thanking him for enduring all negativity when fighting for peace.

Letter from Mary Eunice to MLK

Saturday, June 13, 1964

Mary Eunice writes Dr. King offering her appreciation for the program he held in San Diego, California. Ms. Eunice notifies Dr. King that she will send him pictures from the program.

Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

Thursday, July 25, 1963

The document shown here is a book royalty statement for Dr. King's first book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

Permission to Include King's New York Times Article in College Textbook

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Phillip O. Foss, Chairman of the Political Science Department of Colorado State University, seeks Dr. King's permission to include his article "Civil Right No. 1 - The Right to Vote" in a college textbook. Foss is preparing the textbook "Major Issues of Our Time", to be published by Wadsworth Publishing Company.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Letter from Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey Spivey to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966

Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey write to Dr. King expressing gratitude for the work of SCLC. They further request a donation for their church's building fund.

Letter From D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

D. Parke Gibson informs Dr. King that they will be working with International Correspondence Schools. Gibson also feels that home study education could "lead to upgrading of many Negro workers."

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Royalties Earned from "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

This document references royalties earned in the amount $39.00 from the Van Logham Slaterus' publication of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

New York Times: Johnson Asks $75 Million for Poverty Projects

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

This article, written by Joseph A. Loftus for the New York Times, discusses President Johnson's appeal to Congress for $75 Million for anti-poverty summer programs. Johnson's previous request for $1.6 Billion for the War on Poverty had been granted, and these additional funds would provide for pools, day care, and summer programs for areas of extreme poverty, particularly in the Delta of Mississippi. Senators Joseph Clark and Jacob Kavits, of Pennsylvania and New York, respectively, also appeal for anti-poverty funds.

Letter from Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. reminds Dr. King that he has written him last November for information for a term paper.

Letter from Werner Kelber to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

German native and theological student Werner Kelber writes Dr. King expressing his discontent with the race relations in the Deep South. He compares the attitudes in the Deep South to those under Nazi Germany. Werner also explains that he would like to write his master's thesis on the movement and would value Dr. King's feedback.

Letter from Harper & Row Publishers to Joan Daves

Friday, March 10, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers representative Cass Canfield provides feedback about Dr. King's manuscript for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" to Joan Daves, Dr. King's agent. Canfield suggests replacing the last chapter of of the draft with a briefer and less expansive final section.

Vision of a World Made New

Thursday, September 9, 1954

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

Letter from Carson Lyman to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Carson Lyman, managing editor of U.S. News and World Report, encloses the transcript of an interview with Dr. King. Lyman asks Dr. King make any necessary changes to the transcript, but to make sure "to preserve the informality of the language."

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Letter from Roy M. Green to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Green wants Dr. King to read and give an opinion on the three views of the "Black Ghetto" in the October issue of the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Green states to Dr. King, "Our editors would be most interested in your opinions and comments".

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.