Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"MOLDOVA"

Antioch College Commencement Program

Saturday, June 19, 1965

This is a program for Antioch College's 1965 commencement, at which Dr. King addressed the graduating class.

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Dinkar Sakrikar, General Secretary of Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for accepting a Mahatma Gandhi memorial gift. The memorial gift includes Indian children's toys, a set of Gandhi's books, and a bronze statue of Gandhi to be installed in a children's park in the United States.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This royalty statement reflects the amount earned for the Japanese edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

Friday, October 1, 1965

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

The Law and Civil Disobedience

Tuesday, August 23, 1960

Harris Wofford, a law professor and member of Senator John F. Kennedy's staff, discusses civil disobedience and its relationship to the law at the student association of Notre Dame Law School. He advocates in favor of civil disobedience using the theories of Thoreau, Socrates, Gandhi and others to support the need to break unjust laws. Dr. King pens handwritten questions on the top of this document pertaining to the changing of unjust laws in the courts.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Letter from Dean Florio to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Dean Florio sends condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from C. R. Sanders to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Carl Sanders informs Dr. King that the WSPA station is extending him an opportunity to respond, to an adverse editorial that will be aired.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Letter from William T. and Scottie Lee Ellis to MLK

Saturday, May 25, 1963

The Ellis family informs Dr. King about demonstrations in Alaska, while offering up words of gratitude for civil rights efforts in Birmingham.

Letter From DuPree Jordan to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

DuPree Jordan, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, hopes to meet with Dr. King and hear his suggestions and ideas to improve any of the OEO's programs.

Kingdom of God

Dr. King notes the origin of the ideology of God having sovereign rule over the universe.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from David T. Doherty to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964

David T. Doherty, President of the Western Regional Interfraternity Council, invites Dr. King to attend the W.R.I.F.C. Conference in April to express his views on the role of fraternities within American culture.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Abstract of MLK's Dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman"

Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s abstract of his doctoral dissertation in Systematic Theology at Boston University details the fundamental problem of evaluating the concept of God in the philosophical and theological thoughts of Paul Tillich and Nelson Wieman; methods of procedure implemented throughout his research; and his conclusions drawn from the teachings of Tillich and Wieman.

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Knowledge

Dr. King refers to Ecclesiastes 1:18 which says that increased knowledge brings increased sorrow.

Letter from Peter Manniche to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Peter Manniche, Chairman of the Scandinavian Executive Committee invites Dr. King to the Scandinavian nations to make public, radio, and television speaking appearances. Mr. Manniche is hopeful the Dr. King's presence in Eastern Europe will garner support for the civil rights cause in America.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.