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"MOZAMBIQUE"

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Geneva, Switzerland, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Jefferson Poland to MLK

San Francisco, CA, Florida (FL)

Following the death of his grandfather, Jefferson Poland corresponds with Dr. King to share his belief in man's divinity. After a life of discrimination, Poland's grandfather, Ross Mullin, wrote a poem to Dr. King which criticized prejudice. This transformation after sixty years of hatred represents man's continuous growth.

Telegram from F. M. Horton to MLK

Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway, SWITZERLAND

F. M. Horton relays Norwegian ambassador True Davis' congratulations to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967
Atlantic City, NJ, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Mrs.Herr of the Yakima Chapter to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Washington (WA)

Mrs. Herr, on behalf of the Yakima Chapter of United Nations Association invites Dr. King to speak October 24, in honor of United Nations Week. The organization offers to pay his fee for speaking to their organization.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Letter from Prime Minister Hugh Shearer to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
JAMAICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, newly appointed Jamaican Prime Minister Hugh Shearer thanks Dr. King for his "kind congratulations." Shearer goes on to ask for prayers of success on behalf of Jamaica and its people.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Letter From Peggy Mann to MLK Regarding Children's Book

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mann informs King of the recent publication of the children's book "The Street of the Flower Boxes", a book which concerns itself with matters of integration. Mann, requests that Dr. King provide comments or suggested persons of whom may be interested in the literature.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Tokyo, Japan, Atlanta, GA, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, CHINA

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from Oscar Seitz to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mr. Seitz expresses his appreciation for the efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC by enclosing a check to the organization.

ABC Letter re Issues and Answers

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Peggy Whedon, producer of ABC's "Issues and Answers" program, expresses disappointment that Dr. King may not appear on the show the coming weekend because of a strike.

Theology

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Telegram from the Bailey Family to Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

The Bailey family welcomes Dr. King home.

Art

Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Knowledge)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from a Soldier to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

In one of a series of letters to Dr. King, "Private Friend" seeks further advice from Dr. King on how to combat the discrimination he faces in the Army. Friend's response to Dr. King from an earlier correspondence provides detailed information regarding the sentencing structure of the unfair charges against him.

Letter from Barbara W. Moffett to William Rutherford

Monday, January 8, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Barbara Moffett discusses the possibility of coordinating efforts and collaborative participation between the American Friends Service Committee and SCLC.

Letter from Whitney M. Young to Friends

Wednesday, October 19, 1966
Maryland (MD), New York, NY

Whitney Young, Executive Director of the National Urban League, urges African Americans to educate themselves on the opportunities that the U.S. Navy offers.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN), New York, NY

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965
JAMAICA, Ohio (OH)

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

Letter from Carroll Whittemore to MLK

Friday, September 25, 1964
Boston, MA, Birmingham, AL

Carroll Whittemore inquires about a promotion for Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" to be distributed to roughly 60,000 clergymen. He further requests a photograph of Dr. King to be used for publicity purposes, in a gallery of outstanding ministers.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Saturday, January 22, 1966
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), MEXICO, VIETNAM

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.