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"MOZAMBIQUE"

Letter from MLK to Reverend Lymell Carter

Monday, January 28, 1963

Dr. King informs Reverend Lymell Carter that he will not be able to come to Clarksville, Tennessee due to an extraordinarily busy schedule.

Letter from Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, President of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, thanks Dr. King for speaking out not only against the Vietnam War, but also in support of helping the poor. Rabbi Eisendrath tells Dr. King that he has"ignited the conscience of America, as no other man, on the struggle for racial justice."

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Reynold Moody to MLK

Reynold Moody, a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps, expresses support to Dr. King on behalf of the Miami, Florida Veterans for Peace.

Letter from Dr. John Holton to William Marine Regarding the Price Project

Monday, October 2, 1967

In this letter Dr. Holton, president of the Atlanta Medical Association, states his position on the Price Project. Dr. Holton asserts that he does not agree with the candidates were chosen for the proposal, and must oppose the project.

Letter from Allan B. Schmier to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Allan Schmier writes to request a meeting with Dr. King during the Central Conference of Teamsters Convention in Detroit, Michigan. Schmier expresses that he was instructed by the acting chairman to make the request and informs him of the purpose of the meeting.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

Letter from Hugh Bingham to MLK

Friday, April 22, 1966

Hugh Bingham, Associate Editor of the London Daily Mirror, requests help planning his trip to the United States to report on the "progress and processes of integration." He explains that, in addition to the political aspects of integration, he would also like to write about the people involved in the movement.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Letter from the Saskatchewan Teachers Federation to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964

The Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, a Canadian organization, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Federation extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker, which will involve meetings in four to five cities. The year of 1965 is the "golden jubilee year" and their desire to have an extraordinary individual as their guest speaker.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Catherine Aller writes Dr. King regarding his awareness of agape and its "historic appearance on the Day of Pentecost."

Telegram from Charles Cogen to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Charles Cogen, President of the American Federation of Teachers, writes Dr. King a note expressing that there is national shame because Dr. King is in jail for defending constitutional rights. He also informs Dr. King that they are making their outrage known publicly.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Love

Dr. King quotes Ames' 1933 book entitled "Art" regarding the topic of love. "Love is the true life of man. God is love, and the kingdom of God is within us."

Letter from Rev. T.Y. Rogers to SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Rev. Rogers writes to SCLC affiliates in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi informing them that Dr. King, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, and others will begin serving a 5-day jail sentence in Jefferson County Jail for violating an injunction forbidding them to march on Good Friday or Easter Sunday. He requests that all affiliates meet in Birmingham, Alabama to show support.

Our God is Able

Sunday, January 4, 1953

Reverend Frederick M. Meek retells a story in the New Testament about a civilization and their journey to discover that God is able.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

God

Dr. King cites and comments on a passage from I Chronicles about the gods that are idols.

Letter from Michell Blue to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

A sixth grader from Berkeley, California writes Dr. King to share his supportive view. In closing the young man remarks, "I don't have much to say but thank you."

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

Negroes Hurl Rocks; Cops, Drivers Hurt

An anonymous critic comments on a headline story that details a riot in Lansing, Michigan. Two additional reports are featured in the newspaper clipping including a short piece on Dr. King's visit to Jackson, Mississippi for a four day SCLC convention and a union convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

MLK's Itinerary October-November 1958

Dated 1958, this calendar lists a number of speaking engagements throughout the country scheduled for Dr. King.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Frances Witherspoon to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

Frances Witherspoon offers his or her thanks and praise to Dr. King's new book and efforts in promoting racial unity.