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"MacArthur, Douglas, 1880-1964"

SCLC Annual Board Meeting Agenda

This agenda details a 1966 SCLC annual board meeting in Miami, Florida. On April 12, a review of the White House Conference on Civil Rights took place. On April 13, Andrew Young presented the Program Analysis and Future Projection.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

CCCO Draft Constitution

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes this letter to members of the Agenda Committee for the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations in Chicago. As a member of the Committee, Dr. King receives this letter urging a review of the enclosed draft of the organization's new constitution. Proposed areas of focus outline delegated staff tasks, partnership with SCLC, and broadening membership opportunities.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Letter from Werner Kelber to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

German native and theological student Werner Kelber writes Dr. King expressing his discontent with the race relations in the Deep South. He compares the attitudes in the Deep South to those under Nazi Germany. Werner also explains that he would like to write his master's thesis on the movement and would value Dr. King's feedback.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 22, 1967

This letter informs fellow members of the Spring Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam of the successes of their organization and serves as a call to action on the upcoming steps.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marie Freckelton

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald sends acknowledgement of the receipt of a letter and photograph on behalf of Dr. King to Marie Freckelton.

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

Christianity

Dr. King quotes from Nietzsche's "The AntiChrist."

Song of Songs

Dr. King writes a brief summary of the book Song of Songs.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Sabellianism

Dr. King defines "Sabellianism" as the concept of acknowledging God as one entity with three modes.

Scholarship Essay

Kathleen Lyons, an artist and student from St. Norbert College in Wisconsin, writes this scholarship essay to solicit funds to attend school in Chicago. In the paper, she recounts her experience with art centered civil rights work in Chicago and Wisconsin in various schools, a Native American reservation and a state reformatory. Additionally, Lyons explains that in the summer of 1966 while doing volunteer work in Chicago, she became involved with "Martin Luther King's freedom movement."

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Saturday, November 25, 1967

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Request For Information Sent to MLK from Abram Eisenman

This second "Request For Information" was sent from Abram Eisenman to Dr. King. He asks Dr. King if he and members of his organization will support him for president. He gives Dr. King five main points of his platform that he hopes to achieve as president. He believes it is "imperative" that someone run against President Johnson and unite the American people based on his platform.

Letter from Representative Ken W. Dyal to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to inform him that he has signed the discharge petition for the Home Rule Bill.

Letter from H. M. Joshi to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

H. M. Joshi of India communicates with Dr. King following Dr. King's address at Howard University on the subject of nonviolence. He informs Dr. King about Khan Abdul Ghafar Khan and his influence as a nonviolent soldier in India. Joshi also requests a combination of Dr. King's statements and publications surrounding nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, October 21, 1958

Dr. King commends Reverend Tilley on writing the preamble of an unnamed document and offers a few minor suggestions for his consideration.

Letter from Francis M. Evans to MLK

Thursday, August 13, 1964

Francis Evans wishes to acquire an autographed portrait of Dr. King for his employee, Captain Arthur Graves. Captain Graves is in preparation for a transfer and Evans wants to honor Graves with a special memento.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Letter from John Roney to Dr. King

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Mr. Roney explains to Dr. King that the government will create oppressed social hierarchy within society. As a result, he requests that Dr. King responds to his plea or he will be believe that the rumors of government oppression are true.

God

Dr. King wrote these notes on the concept of God while reading "Science and the Modern World" and "Religion in the Making" by Alfred North Whitehead. He quotes Whitehead, stating that God is the "perpetual vision of the road which leads to the deeper realities."