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Sixth Grade Wisconsin Achievement Test Responses

This is a collection of responses from sixth graders of average ability in a Wisconsin school. Although the instructions are not provided, it seems evident that the students were tasked to paraphrase the passage or, simply tell what the passage meant to them.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

Letter from Charles Woodall to MLK

Monday, February 8, 1965

Charles Woodall, representing the All Souls Unitarian Church of Santa Cruz, California, congratulates Dr. King on his efforts in the fight for freedom. Woodall explains that he is a Georgia native that once lived in Selma, Alabama in the early 1900's. At the time of this letter the SCLC and SNCC were in the middle of a massive Negro voter registration campaign in Selma, Alabama.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy expressing that there is only one God.

61:19 General Correspondence 1961 (R)

Tuesday, October 24, 1961

Maude Reid request a manuscript copy of Dr. King's speech at New Calvary Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves informs Dr. King on the availability of Hermine Popper, who will be working on a manuscript with Dr. King.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Monday, May 29, 1967

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Letter from MLK to Tore Staav

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincerest gratitude to Mr. Tore Staav, the editor of Vi Magazine, for his unwavering support and sponsorship during the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Charles Merrill for developing his ideas, being concerned about his health, and contributing funds that allow both work and rest.

SCLC National Executive Board Meeting

Thursday, March 30, 1967

The SCLC conducts a mass meeting with the national executive board in Kentucky. Both members from the SCLC and Kentucky Christian Leadership Conference direct the meeting. The schedule includes an invocation, greetings from various members, an address by Dr. King, and more.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

International Book Sales Statement for MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

This document outllines book sales and royalties for Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Michael J. Gerstley to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963

Michael J. Gerstley desires to continue to legacy of his grandfather's, Dr. Samuel Loebenstein, autograph collection from over 1500 prominent leaders. Dr. Loebenstein's collection is unique because he would request the leaders to sign over a stamp that correlated with their vocation. Mr. Gerstley provides Dr. King with a stamp of George Washington Carver to carry on his grandfather's collection.

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.

Sacrifice

Dr. King cites passages from Leviticus that suggest that the smell of sacrifice is pleasing to God.

Comments on John F. Kennedy by MLK at the Berlin Festival

Sunday, September 13, 1964

Dr. King gave this speech at the Berlin Freedom Festival in Berlin, West Germany, in memorial to the recently assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Dr. King reflects on the personality, achievements and enormous influence Kennedy had on the world. He highlights Kennedy's commitment to international human rights, which included recognition of Negro rights, and his leadership in concluding the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".

Letter to MLK from the Peace Research Institute

Saturday, November 28, 1964

The Peace Research Institute of Oslo congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and further expresses their interest of having Dr. King speak at a seminar on nonviolence. The institute is starting a research project on nonviolence with a focus on observing inter-group conflicts.

Project Director Job Specifications

This document outlines the role of Project Director and contains notes on the specific responsibilities of the position.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Mr. Brookshire explains to Dr. King the application of the U.S. Constitution to underprivileged groups and urges him to avoid matters of war and peace.

Barth - The Epistle to the Romans

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

The Pastor and His Reference Library

Here is "The Pastor and His Reference Library" by Edward C. Starr. Starr served as librarian at Bucknell. Dr. King more than likely used this resource to conduct research and organize citations while attending Crozer Theological Seminary in Upland, PA.

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.