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Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Memorandum from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other civil rights leaders of a previous letter to President Johnson regarding United States-Africa relations.

Lorene Doss Request for MLK Assistance with a Class Project

Monday, February 19, 1968

Lorene Doss, a high school senior at Sadie V. Thompson, requests the assistance of Dr. King on a project for her government class. The topic of her project is "What are the Main Causes of Poverty".

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Telegram from Al Duckett to MLK

Saturday, July 9, 1966

In this telegram to Dr. King, Mr. Al Duckett professes his willingness to protest in Chicago.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Tuesday, December 27, 1966

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Letter from Frank Van Leemput to MLK

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Frank Ban Leemput, a high school student from Belgium, requests Dr. King provide signatures for the enclosed photos. Mr. Leemput is creating a biography of Dr. King and is in admiration of his political activism as well as achievements in the field of desegregation.

Letter from MLK to Eleanor Martin

Friday, October 11, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Martin for her recent letter, in which she praised his book, "Strength to Love." He also informs her that he will happily accept her invitation to visit her Sunday school class if he has the opportunity.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Letters from Pearce Godfrey to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Pearce Godfrey forwards to Dr. King several letters that he has written concerning his views on United States involvement in Vietnam, the usage of "under God" in the pledge of allegiance, and John F. Kennedy's statement before the United Nations that "life is unfair."

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

Letter from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Wednesday, September 27, 1967

Dr. King is visiting Newcastle, England to receive an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Bettenson of Dr. King's schedule and requirements so that the staff can prepare accordingly.

SCLC Board Meeting Minutes

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

These minutes from the board meeting of the SCLC detail future directions and past victories, as well as current issues.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Letter to MLK from VP Hubert H. Humphrey

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This letter from Dr. King is from Vice President Humphrey and references recommendations for personnel and employment opportunities.

Letter from MLK to Michael Joesph Mansfield

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Mansfield for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Letter from Nancy Fuentes to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Nancy Fuentes writes Mrs. King to express her condolences for Dr. King's death and extend her love to Mrs. King and her children.

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude for the financial and moral support provided by Sarah Harvey. Dr. King states he is sending a copy of "Stride Toward Freedom" as a token of his appreciation.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Faith"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Faith," Dr. King writes out some thoughts on the subject.