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Letter from Martin Sargent to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965

Martin Sargent expresses his and the American Church in Paris' appreciation for Dr. King's attendance and participation.

Letter from Leonard L. Smalls to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

Leonard Smalls invites Dr. King to speak at the Men's Day Conference at the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Martin Fischer at the Theological Seminary of Berlin

Monday, September 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Fischer and the faculty at the Theological Seminary of Berlin for awarding him with an honorary degree. He expresses that the honor gives him courage to strive on and wishes them multiple blessings from God.

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to Conference Participants

Friday, November 25, 1966

In this letter, Director Theodore E. Brown notifies the conference participants of the rescheduling for the Third National Biennial Leadership.

Letter from Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam requests financial support for their mission of ending the war in Vietnam.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Letter from H. Ladd Plumley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

H. Ladd Plumley, the Chairman of the National Emergency Committee of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, writes to Dr. King to inform him that President Jonson asked them to spearhead a citizen-action program to fight crime. In response to these requests, they are planning on holding a conference and hoped the Southern Christian Leadership Conference would appear and be listed as a co-sponsor of the event.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Letter from MLK to James M. Nielsen

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Nielsen that he will not be able to speak in Anacortes, Washington due to the struggle in the South. Dr. King also thanks Mr. Nielsen for congratulating him on being Time Magazine's Man of the Year.

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Letter from Senator Clifford P. Case to MLK Regarding Poll Taxes as a Condition to Vote

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

New Jersey Senator Clifford Case informs Dr. King that he feels strongly about the elimination of poll taxes as a condition to vote, and he will do his best to push through a provision abolishing these taxes.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

This is SCLC

This brochure provides readers with the history of the SCLC, as well as the purpose and breakdown of its staff and programs.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Louis V. Sharples to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Rev. Louis Sharples writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution on behalf of the Church of St. Alban the Martyn. Rev. Sharples expresses their awareness and concern for those negatively impacted by the march in Selma and hope their contribution can offer some assistance.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable John Sherman Cooper

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Kentucky Senator John Sherman Cooper to commend his role in facilitating the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

The Function of the Field Staff

Tuesday, July 10, 1962

The Department of Organization in the Congress of Racial Equality releases a memorandum detailing the function of the field staff position. The responsibilities include stimulating new activity for the group and acting as a consultant.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Ode to Freedom

Monday, July 20, 1959

"Ode to Freedom" is a list of declarations used to inspire and uplift those involved in the movement.