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Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965
GERMANY

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Telegram from A. G. Downing to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

A. G. Downing, executive secretary of the Southern California Baptist Convention, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Wednesday, April 21, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

Letter from Rosemary O'Neill to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
New York (NY)

Rosemary O'Neill of the College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York writes Dr. King regarding Choice '68, the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. O'Neill, Choice '68 Campus Coordinator, requests campaign materials such as fliers, pamphlets and fact sheets to inform students on various candidates.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Tuesday, January 2, 1968
BAHAMAS, New York, NY, California (CA)

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Letter from MLK to South African Embassy

Wednesday, February 9, 1966
Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Having been invited to South Africa by the National Union of South African Students and the Students' Visiting Lecturers Organization of the University of Cape Town, Dr. King writes the South African Embassy initiating the process of apply for a visa.

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Monday, September 16, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
California (CA)

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines John Dewey's views on Metaphysics. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

Letter from Richard Landau of Antioch College to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Richard Landau, Editor of The Antiochian, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and "biographical data sheet" for a story about his upcoming appearance as the commencement speaker.

Letter from William H. Gray, Jr. to Congressman James A. Byrne

Monday, June 5, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Prominent offical and businessman William H. Gray, Jr. writes United States Congressman James Byrne in regards to discrimination issues related to Negro students and the Selective Service System. Gray communicates with Congressman Byrne to intervene in a discriminatory matter involving a young Philadelphia native. Dr. King is forwarded a copy of this correspondence.

The Time for Freedom Has Come

Montgomery, AL, Cambridge, MA, California (CA)

Dr. King discusses the evolution of Negro students partcipating in the movement. This article was published by in the New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Jesus: Mission

Dr. King notes passages in Matthew and Luke related to Jesus' mission.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Florida (FL), Jacksonville, FL, St. Augustine, FL

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Pride of Achievement

Dr. King quotes II Chronicles 26:15 regarding King Uzziah and cites Ralph Sockman’s “The Higher Happiness.”

Tillich's Method

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “The Protestant Era.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from Chuck Sumner Stone Jr. to MLK

Monday, May 28, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Chuck Stone, Editor of the Washington Afro-American, instructs Dr. King to review their publication regarding the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He wishes Dr. King luck in his endeavors and prays for many more men of his stature.

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964
New York, NY, Missouri (MO), Connecticut (CT)

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

Letter from Richard Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

Richard Bennett requests a letter of greeting from Dr. King to be read at the Minnesota Federation of Teachers Educational Conference.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.