Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Maryland (MD)"

Telegram from Mrs. Robbie L. McCoy to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

The Chronicle Church Recorder for The Women of Detroit sends Dr. King a request for suggestions regarding the organization's upcoming demonstration against the "treatment of Negroes in Selma Alabama."

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

Worship

Dr. King notes some characteristics and requirements of worship.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

The Sickness of our Society

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
GEORGIA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966
London, England, Los Angeles, CA, Texas (TX)

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Operation Breadbasket of the SCLC

How to Win Jobs And Influence Businessmen; a speech given by the SCLC'S Operation Breadbasket, discusses job discrimination and the stimulation of Negro businessmen.

Telegram to Dr. James Nabrit from MLK

Monday, July 16, 1962
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Dr. King invites Dr. James M. Nabrit to share the privilege of being a special guest with him at the National Press Club.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK, Clarence Jones and Stanley Levison

Saturday, March 14, 1964
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Joan Daves expresses the importance of gaining proper copyright reassignment for Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967
Atlantic City, NJ, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
New York (NY), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS)

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Atlanta, GA

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

Letter from William Adams to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
New Orleans, LA, New York, NY, Louisville, KY

William Adams from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary writes Dr. King informing him of political matters in New York City, which may hinder the civil rights efforts of African Americans.

Letter from Curtis W. Harris to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Curtis W. Harris demands that the United States Justice Department intervene in Virginia's school systems to prevent discrimination in how tax funds are used for public education. Mr. Harris reports that Negroes continue to be excluded from serving on local school boards and this exclusion "constitutes discrimination and is a violation of Federal law."

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

Monday, September 19, 1966
New York, NY

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

New York, NY, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Thursday, July 8, 1965
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Ohio (OH)

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

Letter from Beatrice Smith to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Beatrice Smith encloses a contribution to Dr. King and explains the interest and sympathy in Dr. King's work. She also expresses concern for the boycott of Alabama product stating that it might result in "more enemies than friends."

Letter from P.B. Boorsma to MLK

Friday, August 6, 1965

The president of the Students Almanac Committee of the Free University of Amsterdam is requesting a biographical sketch of Dr. King to feature in their 1965 edition. The committee is featuring Dr. King because he will soon be awarded the "doctor's degree of honour" at the Free University of Amsterdam.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK about Request

Monday, October 26, 1964
New York, NY

Alfred Duckett writes this letter to Dr. King in order to remind Dr. King of his desire to have a magazine article or television special done on him and stresses the need to present Dr. King's role "not only as a civil rights leader, but also as a father, pastor, husband, and administrator of a steadily-growing national organization." Mr. Duckett also presents the terms of a proposed publishing contract, should he wish to become a part of the project.

Theology

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Neoplatonism

Dr. King describes neoplatonism as "ideas of God." Neoplatonism is focused on the thoughts of Greek Philosopher, Plato.

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960
Louisville, KY, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL)

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

Letter from Robert T. Bowen to MLK

Sunday, January 14, 1968
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Mr. Bowen requests the assistance of Dr. King in establishing a black nation outside of the United States.

Shattered Dreams

SPAIN, INDIA, PAKISTAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, ITALY

In a sermon entitled "Shattered Dreams", Dr. King opens with a passage from Romans 15:24. The Reverend continues with the expansion of hopes and the contrast of shattered dreams. Delivering this message from a theological vantage point, Dr. King closes with "Christian faith makes it possible for us nobly to accept that which cannot be changed, to meet disappointments and sorrow with an inner poise..."