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Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Letter from George T. Raymond to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

George Raymond, Rebecca Taylor and Rosa Ballard follow up with Dr. King about his availability to speak to the NAACP in Chester, Pennsylvania.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Letter from MLK to Mr. G. H. Bishop

Thursday, July 28, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Mr. G. H. Bishop's financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Milton R. Young to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Republican North Dakota Senator Milton Young thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram expressing his views on pending voting rights legislation.

SCLC Project Report

The staff of SCLC provides a memorandum report to supporters regarding the status of current programs and projects. Important financial facts about the organization are also included.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

Sunday, November 28, 1965

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.


Dr. King cites a quote that exemplifies the necessity of understanding human connection. Emphasizing brotherhood, he notes man's inherent dependence on others.

Letter from Mr. David Winder to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Mr. David Winder writes Dr. King in an attempt to gain an interview during one of Dr. King's upcoming visits to New York.

MLK Royalty Statement from Joan Daves

This royalty statement from Joan Daves references a French publication of Dr. King's "Strength To Love".


Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Monday, July 10, 1967

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Ellington

Wednesday, July 28, 1965

Dr. King writes Ruth Ellington of New York to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He describes the current efforts of the SCLC and explains the importance of supporters for the continuation of the SCLC.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

SCLC Revel Report

In this report, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference provides the strategic planning for a nationwide program aimed at educating African Americans on nonviolence principles.


Dr. King references the political philosophy Martin Luther and quotes, "I will side always with him, however unjust, who endures rebellion and against him who rebels, however unjust."

Letter from Reverend Robert Jacoby to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Reverend Robert Jacoby informs Dr. King that his Letter From Birmingham Jail was used in the Sunday worship service sermon.

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Tour Itinerary to Stockholm, Sweden in Connection with 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Awards

This document contains a tour itinerary for Dr. King's visit to Oslo, Norway from Henderson Travel Service.

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Spilman

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Spilman for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges how such funds have been allocated to combat the civil injustices faced by Negroes in America. He concludes by addressing the future social and political agendas of the SCLC.

Letter from William T. Chapman to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

William T. Chapman, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity of Knoxville College, requests Dr. King's response concerning his involvement with their program.