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Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Letter from Perceel Lanfair to MLK

Perceel Lanfair informs Dr. King that she and her husband are looking for a larger apartment.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Monday, June 4, 1962

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Mrs. Frank Summers to SCLC

Monday, April 9, 1962

Mrs. Frank Summers sends contribution to SCLC and wishes to pass on the March SCLC Newsletter.

Letter from Adele Fishman to MLK

Monday, August 31, 1964

The American Book Company is requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail." They hope to include the letter, in a text book, entitled THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THIRD Edition. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

MLK Note Card - "God"

On this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "God," Dr. King evokes an interpretation that would suggest the reverse of existentialism (existence before essence).

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares an Easter sermon entitled "Why Death Could Not Hold Him." He references scripture passage Acts 2: 24. The date and place of delivery for this sermon is unknown.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

Jack Greenberg congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy by MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Dr. King introduces the SCLC's guest speaker, Senator Edward Kennedy at a conference in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Private Freddie J. Friend

Sunday, February 25, 1962

Responding to a letter dated February 8th, which made claims of mistreatment, Dr. King responds to Private Friend with a proposed solution to his problem.

Letter from Thomas Scroth to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King receives an invitation to the Forum Committee dinner in Washington, DC. This correspondence provides details of the format and location of the event.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from the United Nations to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Robin Skuce, Education Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada, writes Dr. King inquiring of his availability to lecture at a seminar for high school students at their New York headquarters.

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Watkins

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Watkins regarding her son's current legal situation.

Letter from Robert J. McCraken to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

Reverend McCracken extends an invitation to Dr. King to preach at The Riverside Church in New York.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes from Hegel's "The Philosophy of History."

MLK Outline on Preaching Ministry

Dr. King outlines the development of the preaching ministry. As an aspiring minister, Dr. King expresses how he wishes to develop his own ministry and provides ideas of the message he desires to share.

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Jimerson

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King sends a biographical sketch of himself to Gertrude Jimerson and recommends she obtain a copy of Crusader Without Violence, a biography of Dr. King written by Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick and published by Harper and Row.

Philosophy

Dr. King describes philosophy as being the "wholes of which sciences describe the parts." He states that the answers to questions will differ depending on the school of philosophy one references.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.