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"Memphis, TN"

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 29:13-14, noting that man can find God if he searches with all his heart.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to lunch after the Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting.

Project Chicago Staff Meeting Minutes

Monday, July 3, 1967

This document recaps the minutes of the Project Chicago staff meeting held at West Side Christian Parish on July 3, 1967. Dr. King is listed as a proposed member of the Advisory Committee.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about "Social Ethics" as discussed in the second chapter of the Old Testament book, Malachi.

Urban Training for Christian Mission Board of Directors Meeting

Thursday, June 1, 1967

This agenda report lists activities for the Urban Training Center's Board of Directors meeting held on June 1, 1967.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Letter from Anne Farnsworth to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Anne Farnsworth acknowledges the kind letters Dr. King sends thanking her for the past financial contributions she has made to the movement. She further encloses a check in honor of the four little girls killed in the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham and the assassination of President Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

Letter from Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Time Magazine's Otto Fuerbringer informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King's picture is apart of a traveling Time cover exhibit. He pledges to forward copies of Dr. King's family portrait.

Letter from George W. Jones to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

George W. Jones, of the National Education Association, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an event honoring Negro History Week in Washington, DC.

Letter from Wilson Woodbeck to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967

Mr. Woodbeck invites Dr. King to be an honorary member of the National Association of Negro Musicians. For Dr. King’s review, several letters are enclosed complimenting the organization on their work and contribution to society.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King visited the city of Paris and was tremendously impressed with the people's interest or racial justice in the United States. Dr. King hopes that a meeting can take place to engage the people of Paris to further support the civil rights movement by providing financial aid to the SCLC.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

The Director of the National Catholic Conference on Interracial Justice offers the support of his organization during Dr. King's imprisonment in Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Mr. David Winder to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Mr. David Winder writes Dr. King in an attempt to gain an interview during one of Dr. King's upcoming visits to New York.

Letter to Augustus F. Hawkins from MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1966

Dr. King informs Augustus F. Hawkins that he agrees with his assertion that there are malice actions within poverty programs and the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Dr. King states that he "wholeheartedly" endorses the proposal to withhold federal funds from communities that are not allowing proper representation of the poor within their Community Action Programs. Dr. King also informs Mr. Hawkins that the SCLC is continuing to prepare for the Chicago Campaign.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

Holy Week Service

Wednesday, April 18, 1962

This Holy Week Service program for Augustana Lutheran Church highlights Dr. King as a guest preacher where he delivers a sermon entitled "Remember Who You Are." The program goes on to detail Good Friday and Easter Sunday Services, as well as informing readers of Dr. King's television interview.

Letter from Claudine Shannon to MLK

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Claudine Shannon, a member of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, asks Dr. King to officiate her wedding ceremony. She mentions that he married her brother several years ago and explains that the bridegroom will cover all of Dr. King's expenses.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.