Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Memphis, TN"

Letter from Henry J. Dillon to MLK

Saturday, August 20, 1966

Henry Dillon, Vice President of Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union, writes Dr. King. He states, "as long as you choose to support the discredited program and philosophy of this Local...I cannot support- or ask my members to support your organization."

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Correspondence: Letter to Dr.King from Miss Marelda G. Fontenot (Jan. 8, 1965)

Thursday, January 7, 1965

In this letter Marelda Fontenot encloses a copy of the school paper, "The Paraclete." The paper features an article about Dr. King receiving the Nobel Peace Price. She offers her sincere gratitude and admiration for Dr. King and his accomplishments.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Letter from Leonard Spacek to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Leonard Spacek of Arthur Andersen & Co. thanks Dr. King for recent comments about open housing in Chicago.

Letter from Svend Erik Stybe to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

The president of the Danish Students' Association invites Dr. King to Denmark to give an address to Danish students.

Letter from Eldredge Hiller to MLK

Friday, June 4, 1965

Mr. Eldredge, Executive Director of The American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, writes Dr. King to express criticism of a statement made in an SCLC fact leaflet regarding "commercial fund raisers." Eldredge states that, while many people in his Association are usually sympathetic to Dr. King's views, the "distasteful" sentiment is exception.

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Atheism

Dr. King records a Francis Bacon quote on atheism.

Letter from Robert Friedman to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Robert Friedman, a representative of "The Forensic Quarterly," asks Dora McDonald to find out if another SCLC staff member can write an article about compulsory service systems for his publication.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Donation from United States Trust Company

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Franklin D. Roosevelt III arranges to have one thousand dollars sent to the SCLC.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

Negotiation Now New York Times Advertisement

Negotiation Now, a national pro-American group opposing the war in Vietnam, planned to publish this article as an advertisement in the New York Times. Clark Herr, Reverend John J. Dougherty, Dr. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Seymour Martin Lipset send this letter, along with an enclosed draft of the piece, explaining that its publishing has been delayed so it can be updated in the ever changing circumstances in Vietnam. The article addresses the concerns of the movement and urges people to call their representatives.

A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

MLK Notes - Voting Issues and Strategies

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's, found on the back of a memorandum, focus largely on voter registration issues and strategies. Of interest is an item adjacent to the body of the notes remarking, "Daddy King has yet to understand non-violence."

Letter From MLK to John R. Kellam Regarding Vietnam War

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Kellam for not only his letter but for forwarding a letter from Democratic Rhode Island Senator John Pastore. All three men oppose the war in Vietnam, and Dr. King responds that is becoming increasingly difficult to understand the reasons behind US foreign policy.

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Dr. J.M. Stansberry

Monday, July 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. Stansberry for his contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King states that without the aid from supporters, the initiatives of SCLC could not be carried out effectively.

Letter from Juanita Turner to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

35 year-old Juanita Turner writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help in her time of crisis. She has lived in Chicago for 12 years and suffers from epilepsy. She needs help finding a trustworthy attorney, a dependable doctor, and basic necessities.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from Atlantiv Human Resources to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

The officers of Atlantic Human Resources invite Dr. King to be the guest of honor and main speaker at their second Annual Meeting.

Neoplatonism

Dr. King describes neoplatonism as "ideas of God." Neoplatonism is focused on the thoughts of Greek Philosopher, Plato.