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The Urban Coalition's National Coordinators Weekly Report

Friday, December 8, 1967

This document contains The Urban Coalition's national coordinators weekly report. The report consists of a schedule of activities, a list of the Task Force on Educational Disparities members, and a list of the Task Force on Housing, Reconstruction, and Investment members.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet describes the SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The SCLC provides information on the purpose of the school, first class citizen preparation and the characteristics of an ideal candidate for training.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dimitri Papaspyrou, President of the Parliament, invites Dr. King to Greece to create a better understanding between Greek and American people.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gulliace

Dr. King writes Mr. Gulliace thanking him for requesting him to comment on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life after Death." However, due to Dr. King's busy schedule with the Movement and ministry, he cannot commit the time to assist Mr. Gulliace.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

The Nature of Hell

Citing numerous Biblical passages, the anonymous writer provides an analysis of the nature of hell and provides brief instructions on how to avoid it. The writer describes the duration of hell as "unlimited and eternal," while the physical environment is, as described in the Bible, "a lake of fire." In order to avoid hell, one must "believe and obey the gospel of Christ."

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from MLK to Hugh W. Nevin Jr.

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Hugh Nevin's letter inviting him to speak at St. George's School. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his full calendar and thanks Mr. Nevin for his nice words regarding his book, "Stride Towards Freedom."

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Letter from Samuel Newman to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

Samuel Newman requests that Dr. King's recent address made in New York on Vietnam. Dr. Newman also provides a contribution for Dr. King's "noble activities".

Telegram from Edward Daniels to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Edward Daniels extends an invitation for Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at the National Conference of Anti-Poverty Agencies.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

SCEF Policy Statement

This is a policy statement on current civil rights and civil liberties issues presented by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. The organization is an educational agency with the purpose of eradicating discrimination among the nation's citizens. This document contains a list of advocacies and condemnations as it relates to federal legislature in favor of civil rights support.

Membership Director's Report to CORE Convention

In this report to the members of CORE, Mr. Robinson outlines the goals for acquiring new contributing associate members and keeping the members they have. It is also concerned with increasing the amount of the donations. The report specifically focuses on membership maintenance, recruitment, growth and the impact of holiday cards.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

SCLC Commemorative Booklet Support Letter from MLK

Dr. King requests financial support for the development of SCLC's 10th Anniversary Commemorative Booklet.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from Walter Jackson to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965

Walter Jackson of Lincoln School in Berkley, California writes Dr. King extending his gratitude for the Reverend's efforts in Civil Rights.

Letter from Paul Anderson to MLK

Paul Anderson writes Dr. King requesting to know his association with Adam Clayton Powell.

Protest Against MLK Flyer

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

The Director of the National Catholic Conference on Interracial Justice offers the support of his organization during Dr. King's imprisonment in Birmingham Jail.

Telegram from SCLC to Miss Geneva Jones

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

The SCLC writes Miss Geneva Jones providing her information on their traveling agenda for a trip to McIntosh, Georgia.

Letter from Asher Feren to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Asher Feren writes to Dr. King to express his concerns for the Hyde Park High School Unity Plan.

Man

Dr. King notes that the psalmist’s view of man in Psalms 12:1 seems to indicate that there are no longer godly men.