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Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Letter from Ann Bettiglan to MLK

Monday, August 16, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Ann Bettiglan writes Dr. King informing him that her friend Daniza Thompson is in need of financial help. She gives Dr. King her friend's address and phone number so that he can assist her.

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959
Atlanta, GA

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Letter from Larry N. Boyd to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Larry N. Boyd, President of The United Piedmont Society, writes Dr. King expressing support for the SCLC's fight to achieve human rights for the Negroes throughout the South.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Rhodesia

Thursday, November 11, 1965
Washington, D.C., South Africa

Dr. King urges President Johnson to respond to the unilateral declaration of independence by Prime Minister Ian Smith of Rhodesia by withdrawing American officials, refusing diplomatic recognition and severing economic ties.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA)

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Denver, CO

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

The Purpose of Religion

Dr. King argues that the purpose of religion is not to "perpetuate a dogma," but to create witnesses to the power of God. He also considers whether salvation comes from upholding a particular creed or whether it comes from an individual reconciling with God.

Letter Withdrawing Support From Gordon Delsemer to Dr. King

Thursday, October 19, 1967
Baltimore, MD

This letter dated October 20, 1967, was sent to Dr. King from Gordon H. Delsemer. Mr. Delsemer is withdrawing his support from the SCLC because of the "anti-Semitic" statements he believes were made by certain black leaders.

Letter to MLK from Guy Dauncey

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Guy Dauncey, Chairman of the Human Rights Committee at Nottingham University, offered this request for Dr. King to visit England, in March of 1968. The content, within the letter, placed emphasis on special events surrounding "Human Rights Year 1968", to begin a progressive Civil and Human Rights movement in England.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964
New York (NY)

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

Memorandum Regarding California Fund Raising Meeting for SCLC

Monday, March 7, 1960
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King addresses Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy informing him of the transportation cost and hotel expenses for his trip to California.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Monday, December 2, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963
Tennessee (TN)

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), GERMANY, Washington, D.C.

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Letter from Harold W. Buchholz to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Harold W. Buchholz, a financial patron, provides Dr. King with tips to appeal to more Americans regarding his programs to provide equality for Negroes.

Invitation from Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

New York, NY

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche invite Dr. and Mrs. King to an informal dinner in the Kew Gardens neighborhood of Queens, New York.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Invitation from the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta Dinner Meeting

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On behalf of the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Chairman Mrs. John W. Stanley extends an invitation to an upcoming dinner meeting where Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director of the Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta, will be honored. Morehouse College President Emeritus Dr. Benjamin E. Mays is scheduled to discuss "Black Power versus White Power" with the attendees.

Letter from MLK to Brigitte Kirch of Germany

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
GERMANY

Dr. King thanks Brigitte Kirch for her encouraging letter.

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967
GREECE, ISRAEL, New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Chicago, IL

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Niebuhr, Reinhold

Dr. King references the preface to Reinhold Niebuhr's book, "Reflection on the End of an Era."

Letter to MLK Requesting Information to Rebut Allegations of Communist Affiliation

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Ernest O. Norquist, Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the Illinois Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., commends Dr. King for his recent speech at Illinois Wesleyan University. He alerts Dr. King of the Birch Society’s attempts to spread allegations of his communist’s affiliations, and recommends a booklet refuting the charges and offers to help prepare and print it. Norquist requests a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago for himself, and other executive members of the Illinois Council of Churches to discuss how they can support Dr. King’s work.

Dr. King Acceptance as an Honorary Member of Wellesley College

Dr. King often had delayed responses due to his strenuous schedule, traveling obligations, and completion of the necessary duties as the President of the SCLC. Dr. King's letter to Miss Knight provides an example of the unintentional unpunctuality as he accepts an award as an honorary member of Wellesley College class of 1966.

Letter from Dr. D. F. Harris to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Norfolk, VA, Richmond, VA

Dr. D. F. Harris asks Dr. King if he can participate in the upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He gives Dr. King the names of people who can be contacted for information about his background, including Dr. Milton Reid, pastor of the New Calvary Baptist Church in Norfolk, Virginia.