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Letter from Rabbi Martin E. Katzenstein to MLK

Thursday, September 26, 1963
Missouri (MO)

Rabbi Martin Katzenstein writes Dr. King to express appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the worship service at Temple Israel in St. Louis, Missouri. He expresses the impact that Dr. King's address had on the congregation and the African American community in St. Louis. He encloses contributions from church service and a check to cover Dr. King's travel expenses.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Monday, April 19, 1965
Chicago, IL

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

Meet the Press

Sunday, August 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., NIGERIA, California (CA)

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, South Africa, ISRAEL

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, PUERTO RICO

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Cover Letter Draft for MLK's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land

JORDAN, ISRAEL, FRANCE, GREECE, ITALY

Sandy F. Ray drafts a cover letter to be enclosed with the packets for Dr. King's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, New York (NY), New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

Schleiermacher (Elements of Pantheism)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion” and writes that it reminds him of Spinoza’s intellectual love of God. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Charles S. Joelson to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Joelson of New Jersey responds to Dr. King's recent letter urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. He informs Dr. King that he shares his view and was one of the 148 members who voted against it.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

Sunday, July 26, 1964
Washington (WA)

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

Letter from Vice President Nixon to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Vice President Richard Nixon writes Dr. King to say he enjoyed their recent conversation. He encloses copies of speeches he has made on civil rights.

Get Well Letter from Mr. David George Ball to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958
Connecticut (CT), Montgomery, AL

Mr. David George Ball, Chairman of the University Lecture Committee for the Yale University Christian Association, forwarded to Dr. King this get well letter.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965
INDIA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Theresa Sutherland to Coretta S. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Theresa Sutherland sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

House Illustrations by the Fair Housing Council in Greater Cleveland

Cleveland, OH

African Americans face discrimination in several suburbs of Cleveland Ohio. The Fair housing Council developed to promote integrated housing options.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
New York (NY), BRAZIL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from James Lynwood Walker to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Berkeley, CA

James Lynwood Walker writes Dr. King about Muhammed Ali's refusal to join the army.

Invitation from Nuhu Bamali to Dr. and Mrs. King

NIGERIA

Dr. and Mrs. King receive an invitation to a reception from the Chairman of the Nigerian Delegation to the Twentieth Session of the General Assembly and Deputy Foreign Minister.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Friday, September 8, 1961
BERMUDA

Vernon R. Byrd, a fellow Boston University graduate, invites Dr. King to Bermuda to be a speaker for Men's Day at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Recommendation Letter from MLK for Harcourt Klinefelter

Monday, December 5, 1966
London, England, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King writes a letter of recommendation for Harcourt Klinefelter, a friend and partner in the fight for justice and human rights.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New Mexico (NM), Iowa (IA), INDIA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Mississippi College Gets Poverty Role

Friday, October 7, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) moves to remove the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) as the sponsor of pre-school antipoverty programs in the state. Sargent Shriver announces that Rust College will receive funding to administer the Head Start program in Marshall and Lafayette Counties of Mississippi. CDGM was one of the most important Head Start initiatives in the country, providing early childhood education, nutritional services, health care and other services to thousands.

Prayer

Dr. King writes about the topic prayer.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Walter Winchell: Man Doing A Column

South Carolina (SC), New York (NY), California (CA)

In part of this edition of his syndicated gossip column, Walter Winchell briefly criticizes SNCC in the irreverent style for which he was known.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Johnson

Dr. King responds to Mr. Johnson's request for a recommendation by writing that he is honored by the request, but he does not believe that he can write a proper recommendation given the absence of their acquaintance. Dr. King makes suggestions for alternative recommendations and offers his "encouragement and support."