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"Milwaukee, WI"

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Correspondence Letter to Mrs. King from Paul Torres

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Gods Existence

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

Saturday, April 1, 1961

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Monday, August 22, 1966

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.

Notecard- Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Augustine's view on sin.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.

The Urban Coalition

Friday, March 1, 1968

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

Letter from T. Spurgeon Bell to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

T. Spurgeon Bell writes Dr. King to voice his concerns regarding the Civil rights movement. In his opinion the Civil Rights bill is not beneficial to the changes Dr. King seeks. He believes that such bills cannot change varying opinions on other races and asks Dr. King to alter his attempt at social change.

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's "Pensees."

Letter from MLK to Premier Lyndon Pindling

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. King encourages Premier Pindling of the Bahamas to accept an invitation to address the Atlanta Press Club. Dr. King assures Premier Pindling that the invitation is a great opportunity to speak with leading journalists from all over the United States.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Response letter from Dr. King regarding Mr. Altomerianos and Charles Evans Hughes High School

Thursday, October 23, 1958

Dr. King took the time to write to the faculty and students of Charles Evans Hughes High School, following his release from Harlem Hospital. In this thank you, he expressed sincere gratitude for the well wishes from the young students relayed to him during his illness. Furthermore, Dr. King acknowledged that the future would be in good hands with their involvement in the struggle for Brotherhood and Human Dignity.

SCLC Mail Log: February 28, 1968

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This mail log exemplifies the large quantity of correspondence that the SCLC received daily, as well as the method that they devised to deal with it. The mail log for this day shows a variety of types of correspondence, including invitations, invoices, contributions, and personal letters from friends and colleagues.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.

The Powell Affair - A Crisis of Morals ad Faith

Monday, February 6, 1967

The National Committee of Negro Churchmen express disapproval regarding the unseating of Adam Clayton Powell as Representative of the 18th Congressional District of New York, and Chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee. The organization issues a call to Congress and the Democratic Caucus for Powell's re-instatement.

MLK Schedule

This schedule of Dr. King's lists the dates and places he will be for the month of September and October.

Letter from Aggie Smith to MLK

Tuesday, January 25, 1966

Aggie Smith invites Dr. King and his children to visit her school in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Royalty Statement for MLK from Joan Daves

In this royalty statement, Joan Daves provides a detailed report of earnings for the British edition of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Letter from H. M. Joshi to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

H. M. Joshi of India communicates with Dr. King following Dr. King's address at Howard University on the subject of nonviolence. He informs Dr. King about Khan Abdul Ghafar Khan and his influence as a nonviolent soldier in India. Joshi also requests a combination of Dr. King's statements and publications surrounding nonviolence.