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"Milwaukee, WI"

Nationalism

Dr. King quotes Charles Summer, stating that being "children of a common Father" is a "more sacred bond" than being a citizen.

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Robert Hilborn, President of The Empire Club of Canada invites Dr. King to be honored as the guest speaker. Hillborn offers the option of two different dates.

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Staff of SCLC

The SCLC lists its executive, field and clerical staff.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Fiske regarding the topic of immortality.

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Letter from Richard Boone to Barbara Hicks

Friday, July 2, 1965

Rev. Boone encloses some adverse literature to be distributed to Dr. King and others.

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Ethics

Dr. King writes on the topic "ethics," according to Proverbs 6: 17-19.

Telegram from Richard J. Daley to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

Mayor Richard J. Daley discusses the issue of human rights in Chicago and the initiation of new programs. The mayor suggests a visit with Dr. King to acquire his intellect on this progressive plan. In addition, Mayor Daley informs Dr. King that he will be attending the National League of Cities Conference.

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Letter from Mrs. Ernest Erber to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Mrs. Erber tells Dr. King that she is sending the newspaper clipping featuring her daughter Elena. Elena raised eighty cents to fight the injustices of racism.

The Annual Men's Fellowship

This pamphlet lists the order of procedures for the Friendship Baptist Church Annual Men's fellowship.

Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Stimma

Friday, April 5, 1968

Maria Stimma wrote this letter to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King to request a transcript of his speech given during the March on Washington. Gertler also discusses a book by Henry Thoreau that is to be published in the near future.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from Stephen Sargent to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

Stephen Sargent, a young student, writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy on the day of Dr. King's funeral service. Stephen's letter mentions his enclosure of a check to the SCLC to assist in the cause for freedom.

Letter from Melvin W. Trent to Dr. King

An individual desiring to remain anonymous, writes Dr. King expressing his concern with employment discrimination and his belief that Dr. King can change things.

Letter from Jane Dahlberg to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

New York University Dean Jane Dahlberg congratulates Dr. King for taking a noble position against the Vietnam War. As a result of his participation in the New York anti-war demonstration, Dahlberg believes that his example of nonviolence was highly emphasized during the march.

Letter from W.J. Hurt to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967

W.J. Hurts thanks Dr. King for his tireless efforts to call for an end to the Vietnam war. He notes that although he doesn't agree with Dr. King on most things, he definitely can stand with him on his position regarding Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gardner Lattimer

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Lattimer for his letter expressing support for Dr. King and his work. He then talks about the importance of making the number of those seeking peace through non-violence known to the public and the government. King continues, commenting on the War in Vietnam and the international adoption of peace through non-violence.

News Clipping Pertaining to Job Corp March

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

The article references a series of hostile altercations between the trainees at a local Job Corps and the residents of Battle Creek.