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"Milwaukee, WI"

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

Thursday, January 25, 1968

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Letter from Samuel Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Samuel Abbott asks Dr. King for a personal favor in writing the preface for his recent publication.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Worship

Dr. King describes Edgar S. Brightman’s four attitudes of worship in “Philosophy of Religion.”

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?".

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Mr. Sakrikar offers a statue of Mahatma Gandhi for a children's park. He then explains the importance of this statue to the vision and practices of Dr. King as it relates to the methodology of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from the South African Consulate

Friday, February 11, 1966

The South African Consulate-General informs Dr. King that his application for a visa to enter South Africa is being taken into consideration. He informs Dr. King that he would be informed shortly of the decision regarding his request.

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Scientific Method (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s article “Authority and the Normative Approach” in the Journal of Religion for a definition of the scientific method. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

An Appreciation Dinner

Monday, December 27, 1965

This dinner salutes the outstanding service of the SCLC staff. It includes menu items for the gathering as well as a schedule of guest speakers and attendees.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Annihilationism

Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Public School 33 Manhattan's Student Council

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Student Council of Public School 33 in Manhattan, NY, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King. The council pledged to practice Dr. King's principles on nonviolence and mentioned how impressed they were to see Mrs. King on television, following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Mrs. Fenner to MLK

Mrs. Fenner, on behalf of the Faculty of P. S. 155, sends a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for use in the fight for African American Civil Rights.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Friday, May 15, 1964

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that Ballantine Books has the pocket rights to "Stride Toward Freedom" but they did not do much with the title. Harper & Brothers then got the rights back.The letter closes by saying that Harper & Brothers would like Dr. King's approval so the deal can be cleared.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Handwritten Notecard Defining Philosophy

Dr. King documents a quote from a book entitled "Philosophy of Religion".

Civil Rights Symposium Program

Thursday, April 8, 1965

This document is a program from a symposium workshop on national and local civil rights challenges.

Letter from Robert McDougal, Jr. to MLK Regarding a Donation Appeal

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

In this letter, McDougal acknowledges Dr. King's appeal of October 1965, however states that he is concentrating his donations on other organizations. On the letter there are handwritten comments regarding Dr. King's response.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Noted Presbyterian Minister and pacifist Norman Thomas thanks Dr. King for sending a birthday message that was played at his reception. He further gives his well wishes to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and hopes to attend Dr. King's recognition ceremony.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”