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"Minnesota (MN)"

Letter from James Gustafson to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Minnesota (MN), VIETNAM, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

James Gustafson, President of 'O KAIROS, writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus. 'O KAIROS is the campus Lutheran community of worship.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes to Dr. King in appreciation for notice of the Selma to Montgomery March. He describes the leadership of Dr. King and others involved in the Civil Rights Movement as "the finest American tradition."

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in the Old Testament book, Amos.

Colwell, Ernest Cadman

Dr. King references Ernest Caldwell's book "Toward Better Theological Education."

Letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Vermont (VT)

Mrs. Kennedy thanks Rev. Abernathy for the SCLC annual financial report and praises its contents. She also encloses a financial contribution and money for a copy of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Michigan (MI)

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Letter from MLK to Hermine Popper

JAMAICA

This letter from Dr. King to editor Hermine Popper references a book that Dr. King is working on. Enclosed is the chapter about "The Dilemma of White America."

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962
Atlanta, GA

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Letter from Neal to Dr. James Cone

Tuesday, May 17, 1983
New York, NY, Illinois (IL)

Neal informs Dr. James Cone of a correspondence he found between Dwight Loder and Dr. King.

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
West Virginia (WV)

Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.

Letter from Harry J. Cargas to MLK Regarding The Queen's Work

Tuesday, November 19, 1963
Missouri (MO)

The editor of "The Queen's Work," a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society, sends Dr. King a copy of the December issue. The editor informs Dr. King that the magazine goes out to twenty thousand Catholic high school students around the nation, and this issue's focus on interracial justice should interest Dr. King.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

Letter from Anna Cohen to MLK

Atlanta, GA

Anna Cohen inquires to Dr. King about the involvement of the Jewish community in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Helen Harris to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
CANADA

Helen Harris, Chairman of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto's Social Action Committee, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

South Carolina (SC)

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Thank you Letter from MLK

Friday, January 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Arthur W. Jordan

Friday, February 24, 1967
Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Arthur Jordan for a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Ivan Allen Jr.

Thursday, May 31, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Mayor Allen regarding a seemingly unfair price quota for the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium that the SCLC plans to use for the Harry Belafonte concert.

Pledge for Peace Campaign

California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Karno and Mr. Saunders request assistance for their Pledge for Peace campaign. This campaign specifically targets the economy through the automotive industry. "I hereby pledge not to buy a new car until there is peace in Vietnam".

God

EGYPT

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 31:3.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968
New York (NY)

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Des Moines, IA, Nebraska (NE), Cleveland, OH, Mississippi (MS)

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966
VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.