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"Mississippi (MS)"

Letter from Jerome Miller to Andrew Young

Monday, January 23, 1967

Jerome Miller, a field representative for Encampment for Citizenship, writes to Andrew Young requesting a meeting and soliciting direction for selecting students to attend an upcoming event.

Letter from Nippon Television Corporation

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Producer Yasuo Yamanaka acknowledges Dr. King's consideration of an invitation to appear on his television program in Tokyo, Japan.

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Telegram from Charles Cogen to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Charles Cogen, President of the American Federation of Teachers, writes Dr. King a note expressing that there is national shame because Dr. King is in jail for defending constitutional rights. He also informs Dr. King that they are making their outrage known publicly.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Smiley

Mr. Francis Smiley expresses his admiration to Dr. King for his leadership in what he describes as a potential end of civilization with the continued course of the Vietnam war. Francis encloses a check as an expression of heartfelt gratitude to the Reverend for his insight, humaneness, courage, and truthfulness.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Vernon R. Byrd invites Dr. King to be the speaker at the Annual Men's Day Service at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church in Bermuda.

A Born Again Christian writes MLK

The author of this letter, signed "Born Again Christian," urges Dr. King to set his ministry more on God rather than participating in civil rights demonstrations.

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves

Friday, November 1, 1963

Joan Daves writes Dr. King concerning materials that she received from Harper & Row Publishers.

Art

Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1956

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. Frank Patch

Monday, January 25, 1965

Dr. King writes Reverend J. Frank Patch informing him that his schedule prevents him from accepting Patch's invitation to speak at the Baptist Union of Western Canada.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Letter from Marc de Jesus to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Marc de Jesus writes to Mrs. King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

Postcard from Dekker Family

The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Letter from a Supporter of MLK

An anonymous person pleads with Dr. King to not accept a rumored government job that was offered to him, in exchange of his plans to alleviate poverty.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Paul Sturges to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Rev. Paul Sturges invites Dr. King to address the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Flinsch

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter to Mrs. Margaret Flinsch, Dr. King personally thanks Flinsch for her generous contribution to SCLC and explains how her support benefits SCLC's efforts.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Robert Green requests for Dr. King to write an introduction to the book, "Education and the Urban Poor."

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Letter from the United Nations to SCLC

Friday, January 26, 1968

The United Nations Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, requests information regarding activities planned and undertaken by the SCLC against apartheid.