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"Mississippi (MS)"

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1960

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Post Card to MLK from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College

Monday, September 12, 1966

This 1966 post card from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College, is a thank-you note to Dr. King and "the Morehouse men" who made alumni contributions.

Mission to Mississippi

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter from Smithsonian Institution to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, invites Dr. King to attend the bicentennial birthday celebration of the organization's founder, James Smithson.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Letter of Condolence from Anny Elston

Saturday, April 6, 1968

73 year old widow Amy Elston, who makes contributions sparingly to the SCLC, is deeply impacted in her philanthropy in the wake of Dr. King's death and decides to send this letter, along with a contribution, to the SCLC to show her support in the advancement of the actualization of Dr. King's dreams.

Letter from Waltraud Feller to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Waltraud Feller writes Dr. King requesting his autograph and any other information that he can provide.

Syllabus In Christian Education

This syllabus outlines the various elements of a course entitled "Christian Education" from Dr. King's experience at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from MLK to Theodore W. Kheel

Tuesday, September 8, 1964

Dr. King graciously declines attorney and noted labor mediator Theodore Kheel's invitation to sit on the Dais at the International Longshoremen's 50th Anniversary Dinner due to a previous commitment in Berlin, Germany.

Letter from Rosetta Ritz to MLK

Sunday, March 13, 1966

Rosetta Ritz expresses admiration and gratitude to Dr. King for his selfless efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Ritz hopes Dr. King will find time to visit with "economically deprived" children in the Chicago area.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Pickett

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Pickett's poem and some questions that she sent. He offers condolences for the loss of her husband and promises that the "redemptive suffering of few brings new life to many."

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

Letter from Gertrude Jimerson to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Gertrude Jimerson requests biographical information for Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Letter from Ida Passano to MLK

Friday, July 15, 1966

Mrs. Ida Kemp Passano sends encouraging words to Dr. King along with her contribution to his efforts.

Letter from Gloria Kenny to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Mrs. Kenny encloses her monthly contribution of $50 to the SCLC and reports that a recent recruitment letter has resulted in 18 potential new members.

Letter from James A. Eanes to MLK

Monday, November 29, 1965

James Eanes, Chairman of the Fundraising Committee at the West Virginia Institute of Technology, invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at the kick-off dinner for their "March of Dollars to Help Tech Scholars" program. The program raises money for the government to match for the National Defense Student Loan program.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Tuesday, May 21, 1963

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

Holiday Card from Julius and Gloria

This holiday card was sent in good wishes for the recipient from a Julius and Gloria.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King quotes George Hedley’s “The Symbol of the Faith.”

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Dr. Edwin Hoffman invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum at West Virginia State College. Dr. Hoffman hopes Dr. King can take time from his very limited schedule to attend the college's convocation.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

Wednesday, June 10, 1964

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."