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"Mississippi (MS)"

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ferre's view on religion.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King regarding certification from the SCLC and disagreements with the NAACP. He also seeks support from Dr. King to integrate the schools in Winston-Salem.

Letter from Edouard Theis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Mr. Theis makes reference of having spoke to a French group of non-violent Christians about Dr. King's struggle for freedom. Mr. Theis suggests a reproduction of "Letter From The Birmingham Jail" as well as the distribution of the French translation as a chapter in a French Nonviolent Action book.

Postcard from Ann Flynn to SCLC

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Ann Flynn writes the SCLC requesting the full text of a speech made by Dr. King at an event sponsored by Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Marion Barry and Edward B. King to MLK

Friday, October 28, 1960

Marion Barry and Edward B. King, Jr. extend their gratitude to Dr. King for his work, which has helped the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in its efforts.

Letter from Richard K. Goidel

Friday, March 15, 1968

Mr. Goidel, a student editor, requests a photograph from Dr. King to be featuredd in an article referencing the recent Time Magazine's Choice "68. Dr. King was nominated as a candidate for by Time magazine's Choice '68 collegiate Presidency. Sadly, Dr. King was assassinated two weeks later.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

Gift from James Allen to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, James Allen, of International Publishers, presents to Dr. King a copy of "The Autobiography of W.E.B. DuBois."

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from Bernhard M. Auer to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Bernhard Auer, publisher for Time magazine, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude for Dr. King's role in helping attain accurate information throughout the year of 1961.

Petition for Charter, the Filing of the Clerk and Certificate of the Secretary of State for Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Thursday, March 24, 1966

The following is a copy of the cover for the petition for charter,the filing of the Clerk and certificate of the Secretary of State for "Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Solomon Mendelson

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dora McDonald is responding to Solomon Mendelson. McDonald expresses her excitement that Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Harry Walker summarizes a recent conversation he held with Dora McDonald, Mrs. Tobye Karl, and Particia Hederman that outlined the dates of future speaking engagements for Dr. King.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK Regarding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Thursday, July 15, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis encourages Dr. King to start a letter writing campaign to prevent the illegal election of Representatives from Mississippi. Lewis offers Dr. King assistance from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Letter from MLK to Mr. D.A. Edwards

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter was sent to Mr. Edwards expressing Dr. King's appreciation for his contribution to the Civil Rights cause.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Financial Report of the SCLC Home Office - Atlanta, GA, 1965-1966

Monday, August 8, 1966

Jesse B. Blayton provides a summarized financial statement of cash receipts and disbursements for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from July 1, 1965 to and including, June 30, 1966. This statement lists the allocations of funds for Operation Breadbasket, voter registration and political education initiatives, legal defense, and more.

SCLC National Executive Board Meeting

Thursday, March 30, 1967

The SCLC conducts a mass meeting with the national executive board in Kentucky. Both members from the SCLC and Kentucky Christian Leadership Conference direct the meeting. The schedule includes an invocation, greetings from various members, an address by Dr. King, and more.

Letter from Ross Bass to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Ross Bass, United States Senator, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for a previous letter regarding support for the proposed elimination of the poll tax.

Letter from John W. Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

John W. Vannorsdall, Chaplain of Gettysburg College, invites Dr. King to come speak at the college located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."

Paint

Dr. King writes about the magnificent wonders of the galaxy.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.