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"Mississippi (MS)"

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968
Washington, D.C.

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Andrew Young to Harry Belafonte

Monday, February 28, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL

Andrew J. Young writes Harry Belafonte applauding him on his television show "The Strolling Twenties." Unlike average shows, Belafonte delivers "high calibre performances" with the ability to articulate the realities of the American Negro. Young further expresses hope that the 1966 Freedom Festival in Chicago has a similar effect.

Request for MLK To Submit an Article for TV Guide

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

TV Guide seeks Dr. King's critique of television's positive contributions to life in the U.S., race relations, and negro life.

Letter from Clara Horner to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Tennessee (TN)

Clara Horner criticizes the methods of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes that instead of marching, Dr. King should work in higher education.

Advice for Living

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965
INDIA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Henry Hart Rice to MLK

Monday, June 5, 1967
New York, NY

Henry Hart Rice sends Dr. King a contribution to express his support for the work of the SCLC.

Letter from Major E. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL)

Rev. Major Smith briefly informs Dr. King of the support he has given Dr. King's program and asks him to reconsider the Alabama Boycott. He explains that he does not agree with this decision and states that this may cost him some supporters.

Letter from MLK to Pasteur Jacques Martin

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Jacques Martin for his recent visit to Lyons, France. Dr. King also wishes to send greetings to some other associates there.

Letter from the Mississippi Club to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS)

Officials of the Mississippi Club make a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and offer a prayer for Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Theall

Dr. King states that he is regretful to hear of Rev. Theall's circumstance and recommends that he contact Attorney Jack Greenberg, Chief Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Foreword to Neil Sullivan's Book by MLK

Berkeley, CA, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King submits a rough draft of his foreword for a text written by Berkeley County Public Schools Superintendent Neil Sullivan.

Letter from John Olson to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Oklahoma (OK), Los Angeles, CA

John F. Olson, a fellow graduate of Boston University School of Theology, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak at Oklahoma City University.

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

The Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E. Invites MLK to Appear.

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Washington (WA)

Wallace Webster, Vice President of the Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E., writes Dr. King inviting him to appear in the Tri-City community.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares an Easter sermon entitled "Why Death Could Not Hold Him." He references scripture passage Acts 2: 24. The date and place of delivery for this sermon is unknown.

Philosophy

Dr. King records a note on G. K. Chesterson's view on man's personal philosophy.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter to MLK from New York University Professor Philip Zimbardo

Thursday, April 27, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

New York University Psychology Professor Philip Zimbardo sends his support to Dr. King.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Friday, August 12, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Letter from President of Yugoslav Baptist Union to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, LIBERIA, Atlanta, GA

The President of the Yugoslav Baptist Union writes excitedly as he finds out Dr. King will be in his country. He requests that Dr. King stop by the church or his home during his short visit.

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965
Iowa (IA), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."

Letter from Danny Cupit to MLK

Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Danny Cupit writes to Dr. King and expresses his joy in reading one of Dr. King's books. He also acknowledges the pleasure of meeting Dr. and Mrs. King after a speech, given by Senator Kennedy.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967
VIETNAM, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., EGYPT, GERMANY, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, CUBA

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964
Georgia (GA), San Francisco, CA, Mississippi (MS), EGYPT, Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC)

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, California, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, CONGO / ZAIRE

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.