Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Mississippi (MS)"

UAW 25th Anniversary Dinner Program

Thursday, April 27, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Indiana (IN)

The UAW's 25th Anniversary Dinner Program contains letters from notable activists commending the UAW, a statement from President Kennedy, a guest list, the evening's program, and a list of sponsors and donors. Guest speakers include: Dr. King, Senator Paul Douglas, Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg, and UAW President Walter Reuther.

Letter from David J. Dennis to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966
Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA

In this letter, David Dennis requests a letter of reference from Dr. King, prior to his draft board meeting, so to challenge an induction into the armed forces.

Letter from MLK to Georges Cravenne

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Cravenne for inviting him to the Palais des Sports. He also thanks Cravenne for supporting the struggle in equal human rights.

Man

Dr. King writes his thoughts on man.

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Florida (FL)

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968
Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Science and Religion

Dr. King wrote this essay while enrolled at Crozer Theological Seminary, circa 1948-1951. The thrust of Dr. King's stance is that "there never was a conflict between religion and science as such."

Letter to Mrs. Levi Hamiliton from Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 15, 1963
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald informs Levi Hamilton that Dr. King perceived the mayor's appointment of a bi-racial committee as ""heartwarming." Furthermore, Ms. McDonald notifies Mrs. Hamilton that Dr. King is unable to commit to a date to come and speak in Goldsboro.

Another Opinion: I Oppose the War in Vietnam

VIETNAM, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

This column contains excerpts from an address given by Dr. King in Chicago, in which he expresses his concerns regarding the Vietnam War and how it will affect poverty in America.

Letter from Clarence E. Duffy to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
New Mexico (NM), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rev. Duffy expresses his religious and political concerns with Dr. King as he considers a potential presidential campaign in 1968.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Scientific Method (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s article “Authority and the Normative Approach” in the Journal of Religion for a definition of the scientific method. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from H. D. Everett to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Montgomery, AL

A proposition letter expressing an economic idea to establish business enterprises owned and operated by negroes.

Statement of Congressman Seymour Halpern in the House Debate on the Voting Rights Bill

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, PUERTO RICO, Jackson, MS

Mr. Halpern addresses the Chairman of the House of Representatives in favor of passing the Voting Rights Bill. He wants to ensure that the bill is enacted in a way that will not allow it to be manipulated by individual states, causing further discrimination against African Americans and non-English speakers. Mr. Halpern goes on to explain other acts that must take place and suggests other tenants to be incorporated into the bill in order to make sure all Americans have equal rights under the law.

March for Peace Flyer

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Letitia Baldrige to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Letitia Baldridge, Social Secretary for the White House, informs Dr. and Mrs. King of changes related to a reception with President Kennedy.

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), VIETNAM, California (CA)

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Montgomery, AL

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

London, England, NETHERLANDS, GERMANY

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK's Stance on Vietnam

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This anonymous letter writer feels that Dr. King's active stance against the Vietnam war takes away from his fight for civil rights. He includes a newspaper article that encapsulates Dr. King's views on the subject, and lists the reasons he feels that Dr. King is being unpatriotic.

Hruska Says Capital...

Washington, D.C.

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962
New York (NY)

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Although unable to send financial support, the author expresses "intense admiration" for Dr. King's leadership and courage.

Coretta Scott King's SCLC Contributors Card

Atlanta, GA

This card reminds Mrs. King of her previous year's contribution and solicits her support for another year.

Letter from MLK to Steve Rubicz

Friday, October 5, 1962
Washington (WA)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Steve Rubicz to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to speak at the University of Washington. Dr. King regretfully declines due to several speaking engagements on his schedule keeping him from accepting additional commitments.

Greeks

GREECE

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Letter from Sonja Lid Larssen and Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, FRANCE

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway congratulates Dr. King on his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and requests that he presents for the inhabitants of Stavanger. The authors detail four reasons why he should accept this invitation, with one including a public meeting concerning nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.