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Myths and Facts About OEO

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This document lists myths and facts regarding the Office of Economic Opportunity.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, New York (NY), New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes from Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Telegram from Robert J. Brown to MLK

Robert J. Brown writes Dr. King with prayerful wishes, encouraging strength in his fight for civil rights.

What Shall We Do to Be Saved

This is an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King, entitled, "What Shall We Do To Be Saved?" It includes an intended introduction. The date and location for which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from Omar Burleson to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

In response to a previous telegram, Omar Burleson, Chairman of the Eighty-Ninth Congress, writes Dr. King to assure him that proper consideration is being given in the Mississippi Congress Delegation.

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, South Carolina (SC), Richmond, VA, North Carolina (NC), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Boston, MA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Cleveland, OH, Pittsburgh, PA, Baltimore, MD, Milwaukee, WI, Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Utah (UT), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

Memphis, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Totalitarianism

New York (NY)

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Strength to Love Royalty Statement

New York, NY, GERMANY

This is a detailed royalty statement from the German language edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche Verlag.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, North Carolina (NC), Massachusetts (MA), JAPAN, SOUTH KOREA, HONG KONG, TAIWAN, PHILIPPINES, MEXICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, TANZANIA, GUATEMALA, PERU, CHILE, BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONAL STATE OF, COLOMBIA, KENYA, EL SALVADOR, BRAZIL, VENEZUELA, New Orleans, LA, Nashville, TN, Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), Colorado (CO), Montana (MT), GERMANY

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967
VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 24, 1964
Washington, D.C., Oslo, Norway

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Order Form: These Are Our Children

Washington, D.C.

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966
Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Ohio (OH), Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

New York, NY

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

Handwritten Notes Individuality and Participation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on individuality and participation. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Montgomery, AL

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

Burn Baby Burn: Problems of the Urban Ghetto

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This letter from the Georgia Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union announces a cocktail reception for Aryeh Neier at the Wit's End.

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Letter from William O. Miller to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Miller expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his recent endorsement of "Teachers Concerned," a local initiative in Philadelphia. He concludes by expressing wishes that Dr. King continues to be blessed in his efforts to "remove all racial lines of demarcation."

Letter from Congressman Ralph J. Rivers to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Alaska (AK), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Representative Rivers of Alaska informs Dr. King that he intends to sign the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from T. Spurgeon Bell to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
California (CA), Kentucky (KY)

T. Spurgeon Bell writes Dr. King to voice his concerns regarding the Civil rights movement. In his opinion the Civil Rights bill is not beneficial to the changes Dr. King seeks. He believes that such bills cannot change varying opinions on other races and asks Dr. King to alter his attempt at social change.

Morehouse Introduction to Philosophy Notes

FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

These typed notes from Dr. King’s early years at Morehouse College are for an Introduction to Philosophy course led by Professor Samuel Williams. King outlines the topic of highest ends: motive and standard, changing and unchanging morality, and reason and emotion that determine the standard.

Note on MLK Recorded Statement

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Virgina Kassel sends a transcript of a recorded statement by Dr. King. Ms. Kassel provides Dora McDonald of the details related to statement and apologies for any errors on the transcript document.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.