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"Mississippi (MS)"

Sacrifice

Dr. King interprets Proverbs 21:3 to mean that God wants righteousness and justice not burnt offerings.

Letter from Senora Springfied to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Mrs. Senora Springfied requests that Dr. King send Leon Hall, an SCLC employee, back to Grenada, Mississippi. She praises Hall and mentions that the town needs leaders like him.

Letter From Martin Peretz to MLK

Tuesday, November 8, 1966

Martin Peretz asks Dr. King for an autograph while commending his courage in the struggle for justice and peace.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

How Dodd Differs From Powell/Dwellings Toured

The newspaper article entitled, "How Dodd Differs From Powell," examines how differently Senator J. Dodd and Congressman Adam C. Powell were treated after a major controversy. This controversy resulted in the removal of Congressman Powell from office.

The Dexter Echo: Christianity & Curiosity

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

Congregation members and supporters of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama are informed of monthly programming and important updates, including the recent change in pastoral leadership from Dr. Martin Luther King to Rev. Herbert H. Eaton.

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Ervin R. Meyer to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Ervin R. Meyer informs Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy that he is against the Poor People's March on Washington. Mr. Meyers perceives these demonstrations as attracting "law breakers" that do not reflect Christian actions. The author identifies additional organizations and expresses their opposition to the SCLC's Christian mission.

Anglicanism

This note card briefly compares Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack Delano

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Dr. King accepts Mr. Delano's invitation to appear for an hour on WIPR-TV during his visit to Puerto Rico.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

MLK Address to the Congress of Federated Organizations

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dr. King addresses the participants in the COFO Mississippi Summer Freedom Project in 1964. He pledges the full support of the SCLC to aid in their mission to register Negro voters and educate them in the process of political participation. In spite of bombings, arrests, and other forms of intimidation, Dr. King urges the members of COFO to persistently work to eliminate the roadblocks to full citizenship.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Amsterdam News: The Measure of A Man - Jackie Robinson

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Dr. King describes his interpretation on the life and efforts of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to further the cause of Social Justice in America.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Tuesday, July 28, 1964

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Press Release for Catholic Interracial Council Award

Tuesday, August 11, 1964

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago announces that Dr. King will be awarded the John F. Kennedy Annual Award at their 1964 benefit dinner as a tribute to his leadership. According to polls published in Newsweek magazine, Dr. King's leadership was prized "more than any other single Negro."

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

Christmas Card from the King Family

Coretta Scott King sends out a Christmas card from herself and her children.

Letter from Arvid Svard to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

Arvid Svard asks Dr. King to provide an introduction for an article Svard is writing for the Swedish Baptist Press, which will highlight Dr. King's work. Svard also requests pictures for use in the Swedish edition of "Strength to Love."

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Official Program of the Spring Mobilization

The following document is an official program listing the schedule of the Spring Mobilization on April 15, 1967.

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Letter from Gail Lamb to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Gail Lamb requests information from Dr. King for her research on prejudice, especially on "manifestations, kinds, and objects of prejudice."