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Religion (Definition)

Dr. King references McTaggart's perception of religion as being an emotional resting between ourselves and the universe.

List of Persons Invited to the Advisory Board for World Government

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

This document lists seven international figures who were invited to take a seat on the Advisory Board for World Government.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. King to Mrs. A. B. Cooper & Family

Dr. and Mrs. King express their regret for being unable to attend the funeral; however, they offer condolences to Mrs. A. B. Cooper and family for the loss of their loved one.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Hans Massaquoi

In this telegram, Dora McDonald writes to Mr. Massaquoi from Ebony Magazine, informing him that Dr. King is not left handed.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Saturday, July 25, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

Sunday, October 15, 1961

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Letter from The American Foundation On Nonviolence to David Hunter

Thursday, January 18, 1968

The American Foundation On Nonviolence makes an inquiry to the distribution of grant funds from David Hunter.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora MacDonald

Tuesday, May 12, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dora MacDonald of the details for Dr. King's appearances on the Today Show, the Martha Dean Show, a Press Conference and a Channel 13 interview.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from Sylvia Walters to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Sylvia Walter writes Dr. King commending him on his strong statements and expresses that he has given many the strength to continue in fight for civil rights and peace.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

Letter from Rev. David Bentley to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Rev. David Bentley, resident and missionary from Amman, writes Dr. King inviting him to visit Jordan. Bentley wants Dr. King to see the displacement and maltreatment of the citizens of Jordan.

God Pronounces Judgement of America

Sunday, December 25, 1966

God Pronounces Judgment of America is allegedly a prophecy from God, through his servant Reverend R. G. Hardy, given on Christmas Day 1966. It reveals that a horrible earthquake and war are in the future.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council for his efforts during Dr. King's visit to Sweden. Dr. King also requests the names of others who he should thank.

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Letter from MLK to Senator Phillip A. Hart

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Phillip A. Hart expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story

Monday, December 31, 1956

This dramatic story gives a riveting account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott movement and its aim to end segregation of the public transit in Montgomery, Alabama after the arrest of Rosa Parks. E.D. Nixon and other ministers illustrate the philosophy of nonviolent tactics employed by the Montgomery Improvement Association and their struggle for "cosmic companionship."

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Ms. Tourian commends Dr. King for his efforts against violence and describes the antagonism and discrimination against immigrants when she came as an Armenian to the U.S. in 1903.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

Letter from Joan Finney to MLK

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

California Democratic Council Secretary Joan Finney encloses the remainder of a financial contribution to Dr. King and the SCLC. Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker was the keynote speaker for an event held by the council and was presented the first part of this donation.