Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Missouri (MO)"

Letter from Eleanor Hicks Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Ms. Hicks informs Dr. King of land available for sale in Randolph County, Alabama. Ms. Hicks and her family desire to keep the land's ownership and rehabilitate it for families to live.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Iowa (IA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Des Moines, IA

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from Joseph F. McCrindle to SCLC

Wednesday, December 28, 1966
New York, NY

Joseph F. McCrindle, President of the Henfield Foundation, encloses a check of $250.00 to SCLC on behalf of the Henfield Foundation.

Statement from American Jewish Congress Regarding the Bundy School-Decentralization Plan

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Murray A. Gordon, a New York lawyer and national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, endorses the Bundy School-Decentralization plan. Mr. Gordon believes that the reform is essential to good education and assures teachers that the plan will not violate their rights.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Elinor G. Galusha Request "I Have a Dream" by Dr. King 1966

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This is letter from Elinor G. Glusha requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in book titled "Words of Faith".

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, San Francisco, CA

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

Letter from Robert M. Steornson to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Robert Steornson commends Dr. King for taking a stand against the Vietnam war and his efforts to promote peace.

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), VIETNAM

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

War (Just War)

Dr. King cites Francisco Suarez's definition of a "just war" from his "Tractibus de. Legibus."

Response to SCLC Attendance at Cooperative League Meeting

Friday, July 28, 1967
Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Following up a letter sent by Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, Stanley Dreyer, president of The Cooperative League of the USA, writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson. Mr. Dreyer hopes that it will be possible for Rev. Jackson to be present at the meeting held in Des Plaines, Illinois on August 11.

Letter from Joan Baez's Law Firm to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
California (CA)

Singer Joan Baez's law firm expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's recent correspondence.

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, New York (NY)

Dr. King states that the key to an extended and fulfilling life is to live a life that is "three dimensional." He further identifies these dimensions as: "length, breadth and height." Dr. King proclaims these dimensions will ensure a life of self-love, community and love for God.

Form Letter Regarding the Civil Rights Movement

In this form letter the author talks about the necessity to eliminate ignorance.

Letter from Moe Foner to a Friend

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
New York (NY), Chicago, IL

Moe Foner is writing in regards to a new publication called, "Labor Voice For Peace." The issue mentioned covers the conference of labor leaders held in Chicago. Foner also asked for any comments concerning the publication.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
Washington, D.C.

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.

Letter from Flournoy Coles to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Flournoy Coles invites Dr. King to come to Fisk University and lead a session of the Honors Program.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Kant

Dr. King outlines principles of Kantian philosophy regarding morality and religion.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Prince Edward County, VA, Atlanta, GA, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Connecticut (CT), North Carolina (NC), KENYA

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.