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Press Release from Edward Lamb

Friday, October 13, 1967

This press release from Edward Lamb, an Ohio delegate to the 1964 Democratic National Convention, expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and to President Lyndon Johnson, who had pledged as a candidate not to escalate the war.

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row, Publishers for MLK

This document features a royalty statement from Harper & Row, Publishers, for Dr. King's "Strength to Love."

Letter from Paul Rosing to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King is notified by Paul Rosing of the Borromeo Seminary College that he has been placed on the mock ballot for their "Choice 68" campaign. He asks that Dr. King submit any type of potential campaign literature, speeches and etc.

Letter from M. Steven Lubet to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

M. Steven Lubet is requesting the presence of Mr. and Mrs. King at the Vietnam teach-in. The teach-in is being sponsored by the Northwestern chapter of Students for a Democratic Society and its purpose is to increase people's understanding of the events occuring in Vietnam.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

This is the SCLC's 1963 Spring Newsletter. Articles include: "The 22 Billion Dollar Giant" and "Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany."

Letter from V. W. Shepard to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

V. W. Shepard admonishes Dr. King for joining the anti-Vietnam War Movement. He explains that prior to Dr. King's joining the movement he considered the Reverend to be "one of the greatest living Americans."

Index Card - MLK Handwritten Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King focused on the topic, The Kingdom of God. He referenced Cave, author of 'The Christian Way.'

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Watkins

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Watkins regarding her son's current legal situation.

Letter from Wilma Hopkins to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Hopkins sends prayers and Bible scriptures to Dr. King to emotionally support him during his jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama.

Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood, Inc. Program

Friday, June 4, 1965

The Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood organized this program where Dr. King makes a special address.

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Schleiermacher (Attributes of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King writes about Irish philosopher and theologian John Scotus Eriugena. He records a quote that states, "Authority comes from reason not reason from authority."

Peace

Dr. King writes on the topic of peace.

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Congressman Gallagher of New Jersey writes Dr. King to confirm reception of his telegram in which he urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Mississippi Congress was seated despite Congressman Gallagher's vote against the action.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Letter from Constance A. Price to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Price writes to Dr. King to request that he makes mention of the blatant injustices committed by the State of Colorado, to its citizens, during the "poor people's campaign" in Washington, D.C.

Letter from MLK to Wesley Fisher

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the kind letter from Mr. Fisher. He also informs him that Aaron Henry has been absent and will probably reply about some donated clothing upon his return.

Press Conference Statement on New York

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.