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People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

The Committee of Responsibility Thanks Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Herbert L. Needleman, Chairman of The Committee of Responsibility, expresses his appreciation for Mrs. King's sponsorship of the program. He assures her that the response received regarding the program launch has been of great size.

Statement by Reverend Jesse Jackson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Reverend Jesse Jackson gives a report regarding SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Jackson states, "There are no riotous fires set aflame in this country that can be put out with water from a rubber hose; the flames must be extinguished by money from an economic hose."

God Nature

Dr. King sketches his thoughts on Saint Thomas Aquinas' "investigation of God's nature."

Telegram to MLK from W.E. Gardner

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Rev. Gardner organizes a board meeting to plan for a Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

"A Constructive Use of the Sense of Shame" is the title of this sermon outline, prepared by Dr. King. The parable of the 'Prodigal Son' is the chosen text for the sermon.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Tuesday, May 21, 1963

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes on the concept of "Messianic Hope" as covered in the Old Testament book, Micah.

Telegram from Russell Tuten to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Russell Tuten writes Dr. King expressing his support in extending Voting Rights and complete citizenship to all Georgia residents. Tuten states, "Georgia should be commended for its progress in conforming to the laws of the land."

Letter from Alan Campbell to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

Alan B. Campbell writes Dr. King to express his appreciation for the address "Paul's letter to American Christians," which he hopes to republish in national journals such as Readers' Digest.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

Educational Conference Program 1967

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Dr. King serves as a guest speaker at a conference sponsored by The Allied Educational Foundation. This program outlines the itinerary for the event including the presentations of other speakers namely Max Lerner, Harrison E. Salisbury, Senator Gale W. McGee, and Stanley Levey.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Letter from Haakon Knudsen to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

The Director of Field Activities from American Baptist Convention writes Dr. King to invite him to speak at the upcoming conference for their department.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves' Office to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This letter from Ms. Daves' office to Dr. King is a breakdown of various foreign rights royalties to "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos Or Community?".

Letter from Eldredge Hiller to MLK

Friday, June 4, 1965

Mr. Eldredge, Executive Director of The American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, writes Dr. King to express criticism of a statement made in an SCLC fact leaflet regarding "commercial fund raisers." Eldredge states that, while many people in his Association are usually sympathetic to Dr. King's views, the "distasteful" sentiment is exception.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

Letter from Roosevelt Zanders to MLK

Sunday, June 3, 1962

Roosevelt Zanders expresses his appreciation to Dr. King after receiving a kind letter and personal autographed copy of "Stride Toward Freedom." Zanders expresses his appreciation for the luncheon in Washington, D. C. and states his desire to visit the Reverend again.

March for Poor People

This document outlines the problem of poverty in America and suggests active participation as the only answer to the issue of poverty. The author argues that the March of Poor People to Washington is an opportunity to become involved in the effort to counteract poverty in America.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from Robert Beverly to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Robert Beverly of the City Employees Union Local 237 writes to Dr. Abernathy informing him of the enclosed May edition of the union's newspaper.

Poor People's Campaign News

Friday, March 15, 1968

This newsletter shares details regarding the end of a historic meeting of American minority group leaders who declared unanimous support for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. The names of organizations and leaders pledging their support are also included.


Dr. King wrote these notes on the concept of God while reading "Science and the Modern World" and "Religion in the Making" by Alfred North Whitehead. He quotes Whitehead, stating that God is the "perpetual vision of the road which leads to the deeper realities."

The National Council of Negro Women

This brochure gives a brief overview of the NCNW and the positive results its had on the Negro community.