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"Missouri (MO)"

The Word of God

Dr. King references Karl Barth on the "word of God."

Immortality

Dr. King discusses the relationship between the physical and spiritual elements of man. He notes four theories that describe the nature of soul and body.

Freedom

Dr. King writes on the topic of "freedom," according to Jeremiah 1:5.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 11, 1967
New York (NY)

Gitta Badeker informs Dora McDonald of an offer from Santi Ando & Figli for the Italian rights to "Where Do We Go from Here," and includes administrative instructions on how to proceed.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012
New York, NY

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959
Montgomery, AL, GREECE, JORDAN, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This document is a letter from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. in regards to New York Times Magazine's request to reprint Dr. King's publication: "Where We Are Going". April 26, 1967

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

Letter from John D. Reinheimer to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Reinheimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Wayne County Interfaith Commission on Human Rights, inquires about Dr. King's response toward debasing remarks made about him by Ohio Congressman John M. Ashbrook. The author states that the Commission does not agree with Mr. Ashbrook's comments and would like to assist in refuting them.

Letter from Reverend R.V. Brown to MLK about Moral Support

In this letter Reverend R.V. Brown offers his moral support to Dr.King.

White House Invitation to Signing of Voting Rights Act

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

This telegram from The White House invites Dr. King to the U.S. Capitol for the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960
Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963
Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN)

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King to ask him to consider donating his papers to the Atlanta University Center Library as an alternative to Boston University.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Iowa (IA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Des Moines, IA

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Freud

Dr. King draws an analogy between Columbus and Dr. Sigmund Freud in that each discovered a "continent."

Letter from MLK to Michael Joesph Mansfield

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator Mansfield for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from W. E. Charlton to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, South Dakota (SD)

W. E. Charlton of the Curtis Publishing Company informs Dr. King of suspicious Saturday Evening Post order subscriptions under his name to different addresses. Charlton explains that they have cancelled the subscriptions and request that he ignore any billing until the fix is complete. Charlton encloses the fraudulent subscription order forms.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

Statement of Mrs. Ruthie Lee Watts Regarding Death Plot on Dr. King

Selma, AL

Mrs. Watts submits a statement regarding a plot to assassinate Dr. King. She informs the FBI that a man named Jim Clark planned to kill Dr. King.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.