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Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Quasi Positivism

Dr. King outlines philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's views on the relationship between metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Referencing Whitehead's work "The Concept of Nature," this note card contains a quote from the original text and also paraphrases Whitehead's writings.

Letter from G. Merrill Lenox to MLK

Friday, April 19, 1963

G. Merrill Lenox, Executive Director for the Metropolitan Detroit Council of Churches, informs Dr. King he is being remembered and in the daily prayers of thousands during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?".

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Letter from Paul Sturges to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Rev. Paul Sturges invites Dr. King to address the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention.

Letter from Edwin Fenton to MLK about permission to use Marchi on Washington speech

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Edward Fenton, Co-Director, Social Studies Curriculum Development Center at Carnegie Institute of Technology writes to request permission to duplicate some excerpts from Dr.King's speech in Washington during the summer of 1963 without fee. Operating under a grant from the United States Office of Education, the Center is developing new courses of study and writing materials to teach social studies inductively to able students in grades nine through twelve.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Statement by MLK

Dr. King releases a public statement addressing the issues regarding the conflict in Vietnam.

Anthropology

Dr. King outlines and references ideas on anthropology.

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.

Letter from Michael Greywitt from to MLK Requesting Interview

Friday, May 21, 1965

In this letter dated 5/21/1965, Greywitt informs Dr. King that there have been many requests from listeners requesting an interview from Dr. King on the "current status of the Civil Rights Movement". Greywitt is the producer of the Michael Jackson Program on the CBS Radio Pacific Network.

Telegram from Mrs. King to David Rogers

Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Mrs. King sends Mr. Rogers her appreciation for his effort in turning Dr. King's birthday into a federal holiday.

Invitation from Hubb Coppens to MLK

Sunday, August 16, 1964

Hubb Coppens invites Dr. King to make an appearance at West Berlin to address the Dutch students during his time in Europe. Mr. Coppens explains that it is the schools aim to educate their students on world issues.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. Frank Patch

Monday, January 25, 1965

Dr. King writes Reverend J. Frank Patch informing him that his schedule prevents him from accepting Patch's invitation to speak at the Baptist Union of Western Canada.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Weatherhead on Love

Dr. King records a quote from Leslie Dixon Weatherhead's "Why Men Suffer."

Correspondence to MLK from D. Leon Everett II

Saturday, July 3, 1965

D. Leon Everett is notifying Dr. King that he will be sending two checks from his church for the SCLC and SNCC. He offers his continuous support for the movement. He makes mention of information in regards to holding a recital for Mrs. King and a souvenir book

Coretta Scott King Program

A program from the First Baptist Church recognizing Coretta Scott King, dated April 30, 1959.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Mrs. Joan Kimmey to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 12, 1968

On behalf of the Baha'is in Teaneck, New Jersey, this letter offers condolences to Mrs. King for the recent assassination of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Heartfelt sentiments express admiration for Dr. King's vision, dedication, and teachings.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.