Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Montgomery, AL"

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

Letter from Alan Geyer to W. L. Harriford

Monday, June 30, 1969

Alan Geyer informs W. L. Harriford that they do not have reprints of Dr. King's article from the October 8, 1958 issue of The Christian Century. However, Mr. Geyer has enclosed an excerpt from the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Western Union Telegram from Harrison Tweed and Bernard G. Segal to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965

Mr. Tweed and Mr. Segal urge Dr. King to observe Judge Johnson's order prohibiting marches to Montgomery, Alabama. They also enclose an excerpt of their telegram to Governor George Wallace compelling him to restrain law enforcement from excessive force.

Letter from MLK to Marguerite Braymer

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Braymer of Questar Corporation for her generous contribution of 25 shares of Standard Oil Company of New Jersey stock to the SCLC.

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Letter from William T. McKnight to Time Magazine

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

William McKnight communicates with officials at "Time" magazine, thanking them for honoring Dr. King as their "Man of the Year." He feels that their decision to honor Dr. King also gives attention to the plight of the Negro in 1963.

Telegram from Bea Stanley to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Bea Stanley writes to Dr. King during his confinement at the Jefferson County Courthouse Jail. Stanley informs him that many of his supporters and friends are concerned regarding his health and safety, and also updates him on the progress of one of his publications.

Man

Dr. King writes on "man" and considers the evolutionary thinking behind "the survival of the fit."

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Henry Luce for the invitation to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine. However, due to another engagement on the other side of the U.S., Dr. King regretfully cannot commit to come to the dinner.

Employment Recommendation Letter to MLK from Stone's Mercantile Agency on behalf of Raymond C. Fauntroy

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

In this letter Thelma Goldsborough, a representative of Stone's Mercantile Agency, requests a personal reference for Raymond C. Fauntroy from Dr. King.

The Philosophy Of Nonviolence And the Tactic Of Nonviolent Resistance

This document discusses the philosophy and tactic of nonviolence. The three nonviolent resisters discussed are Jesus, Gandhi, and Dr. King.

Letter to MLK Requesting Information to Rebut Allegations of Communist Affiliation

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Ernest O. Norquist, Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the Illinois Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., commends Dr. King for his recent speech at Illinois Wesleyan University. He alerts Dr. King of the Birch Society’s attempts to spread allegations of his communist’s affiliations, and recommends a booklet refuting the charges and offers to help prepare and print it. Norquist requests a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago for himself, and other executive members of the Illinois Council of Churches to discuss how they can support Dr. King’s work.

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Letter from Joan Daves Regarding International Travel

Tuesday, September 15, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she telephoned Mr. Smeaton regarding lodging arrangements in London and Berlin.

Definition of History

Dr. King explains a definition of history.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.

Telegram from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Melvin Arnold asks Dr. King to approve either "The Strength to Love" or "The Cost of Love" as the title of Dr. King's book.

Letter from MLK to Quentin N. Burdick

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Quentin Burdick, a United States Senator from North Dakota, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter of Condolence from Martin and Coretta Scott King to Mrs. Lee Gaber

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Mr. & Mrs. King express sincere condolences to Mrs. Lee Gaber and family during her time of grief.

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

Knowledge

Dr. King refers to Ecclesiastes 1:18 which says that increased knowledge brings increased sorrow.