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"Montgomery, AL"

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Painting

Dr. King paraphrases Homer's "The Odyssey" and quotes some prose entitled "The Bible."

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss inform Dr. King that his recent broadcast on Face the Nation has reinvigorated their faith in the movement.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Dora Byron wrote this letter to Dr. King inviting him to participate in a television program at Emory University.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

Letter from Pennsylvania State University to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 22, 1965

Nina C. Brown writes Dora McDonald on behalf of Pennsylvania State University to thank her for arranging Dr. King's trip to the school.

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Monday, July 30, 1962

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

MLK's Recommendation Letter for Alan Wachtel

This original letter was handwritten and initialed by Dr. King for Alan Wachtel, who he was recommending for law school.

Letter From Elizabeth Green to MLK

Monday, October 28, 1963

Elizabeth Green informs Dr. King of the news stories covering his appearance at Mount Holyoke College and encloses copies of the stories.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, writes Dr. King to invite him to a meeting with members of the British Parliament to discuss the developing racial crisis in their country. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Eugene Exman expresses his delight that Dr. King will be completing the manuscript for a book of sermons. Exman also asks Dr. King to meet with him in August, if Dr. King plans to travel to Martha's Vineyard. The book of sermons mentioned in this letter eventually would be entitled "Strength to Love."

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Letter from Ernest Marshall Howse to MLK

Friday, January 10, 1964

Rev. Howse invites Dr. King to preach at the Craddock Student Mission in Toronto during Dr. King's planned trip to the area.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Letter from Mervyn Dymally to MLK

Wednesday, October 25, 1967

California State Sen. Mervyn Dymally (D-CA) expresses appreciation and support to Dr. King for the efforts of the SCLC with Operation Breadbasket in Los Angeles, CA.

Telegram from MLK to President John F. Kennedy

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King sends an urgent telegram to President Kennedy recommending Judge William Hastie and Judge Thurgood Marshall be given serious consideration for a seat on the Supreme Court.

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.