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"Montgomery, AL"

Telegram from Richard Avedon supporting MLK

Saturday, April 17, 1965

This telegram in support of Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War was sent by notable photographer, Richard Avedon, his wife, and Michael Mindlin.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 22, 1968

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from MLK to William Smith

Monday, July 13, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Smith for his contribution of $50 to the SCLC. He updates him on how much money was raised at a recent reception and details how it will be used. Dr. King also sends a copy of his latest book as an expression of appreciation.

Letter from Ben Baldwin to MLK about an Interview

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter Ben Baldwin of Ring Radio WRNG requests an interview with Dr. King to be part of an all talk radio show, which would open in Atlanta.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Aaron Edgar Oliver writes Dr. King to give thanks for his efforts to try and lead the Republican convention in its choice of a candidate.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

Rauschenbusch on Sin

Dr. King references and outlines Rauschenbusch's view on sin. Rauschenbusch was a Baptist minister and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement.

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."

March for Peace Flyer

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from J. V. Jones to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

J.V. Jones questions whether Dr. King's position on the Vietnam war is helping the black race because he believes otherwise. Jones also encloses a Walter Winchell article from the Los Angeles Harold Examiner.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to Wyatt Tee Walker

Monday, September 24, 1962

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Wyatt Tee Walker regarding the progress of the SCLC. Kennedy believes that the right to vote will eliminate "continued discrimination and injustice."

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention

Monday, August 14, 1967

A program outlining the course of events for the 10th Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King sends this telegram to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding Saint Augustine's refusal to desegregate its public facilities.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to Wyatt Walker

Monday, June 22, 1964

This telegram is part of a correspondence chain with famous New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller. Rockefeller informs Wyatt Tee Walker that a schedule conflict prohibits his attendance at the Dedication of New Churches in Albany.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding an Offer from Protestant Publishing

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this Letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about an offer from Shinkyo Shuppansha (Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd.). A description of an advancement pay, royalty percentage and number of copies are included in this letter.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from Chester S. Williams to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Mr. Williams, a member of the executive committee of his local branch of the NAACP, expresses his displeasure at NAACP Executive Director Roy Wilkins attacking Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Harper & Row, Publishers, Book Format Instructions

This document contains instructions for the proper format of one of Dr. King's books.