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"Montgomery, AL"

Postcard from Dekker Family

The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Reason

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Bible regarding reason.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1967

In this document, Dr. King receives a royalty check from J. Campe for the use of A Stone of Hope in a work entitled "This Nation." The amount of the check is 13.50.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. Sardon

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. Sardon for his participation in and support of the Albany movement.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Clyde L. Manschreck

Thursday, August 15, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald responds to a previous request made by Rev. Clyde Manschreck of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Miss McDonald informs Rev. Manschreck that the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" will be a part of Dr. King's newest publication that will be available in the fall of 1963.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to Dr. Westin

Dr. King writes to decline the invitation of Dr. Alan F. Westin to serve on the Honorary Advisory Board of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties at Columbia University. He cites the urgent demands on his time by the civil rights movement as his reason.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Mr. Wachtel expresses gratitude for a grant awarded by the Stern Family Fund to the American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC.

Birthday Card to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Margaret, which includes a verse from the book of Matthew.

Letter from Rosamond C. Kay, Jr. to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Reverend Rosamond Kay, Jr. invites Dr. King to speak at Morning Star Baptist Church in Pennsylvania. He also informs Dr. King he is a 1939 graduate of Morehouse College, and their fathers are life-long friends.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

SCLC Revel Report

In this report, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference provides the strategic planning for a nationwide program aimed at educating African Americans on nonviolence principles.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

History

Dr. King cites Reinhold Niebuhr's definition of history and its relation to God.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Draft Speech for Atlanta Nobel Peace Prize Reception

Dr. King drafts a speech that he will make in Atlanta for the reception honoring his Nobel Peace Prize winning. In the speech he offers his gratitude to friends and family who supported him in his efforts. Dr. King also briefly discusses the issue of racial injustice and the continued fight for equality.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves issued this royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin

Thursday, August 15, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald expresses appreciation for the poem of Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin of the Progressive National Baptist Convention in New York. She encloses fifty copies of one of Dr. King's letters as Mrs. Mdonana-Arbouin requested.