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"Montgomery, AL"

My Jewish Brother

Wednesday, February 2, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King responds to a recent anti-Semitic remark made by a fellow civil rights leader. He discusses the need for Hebrew prophets to revitalize the moral conscious of society. "Let justice roll down like the waters of righteousness as a might stream."

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Cambridge, MA, New York, NY

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Nashville, TN, Chicago, IL, Nebraska (NE)

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Monday, March 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for sending her the commission check from the "Saturday Review" SELMA piece. Daves goes on to say that Dr. King's article on the Watts riots was not published in several publications due to "scheduling problems", but will run in the "Saturday Review".

Final Plans for the Washington Poor People's Campaign

Washington, D.C., Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA, Los Angeles, CA, Denver, CO

This document outlines the dates, times, places and events that will take place in preparation for the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
SWEDEN

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Letter from W. C. Akers to MLK

Missouri (MO)

W. C. Akers expresses his concern about Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Eugene Sands

Thursday, July 30, 1964
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes Mrs. Eugene Sands to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Samuel Newman to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Samuel Newman requests that Dr. King's recent address made in New York on Vietnam. Dr. Newman also provides a contribution for Dr. King's "noble activities".

Lette from Alta Yount to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Alta Yount expresses her approval of a speech that Dr. King delivered. She also requests some copies of it.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Yankowski to MLK

Monday, July 4, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. and Mrs. Yankowski of New York inform Dr. King of their plan to open a museum for junior high students featuring Americans of great importance. They request a collection Dr. King's past articles and photographs to be highlighted in the museum.

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

Appeal to Community Business People

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document is a letter from the Greater Chicago Scavenger Association to Negro citizens. The letter informs the citizens of the beneficial affect that The Greater Chicago Scavenger Association can have on them and their community.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Kansas (KS)

Mrs. Gossett writes to Martin Luther King Jr, regarding his article in Look Magazine. Throughout the letter Mrs. Gossett also references issues regarding old age assistance, social security and pensions.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

The Road to Freedom

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Saul Sherman

Thursday, August 20, 1964
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Sherman for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Seminar in Social Philosophy Notes

Dr. King records notes for his Seminar in Social Philosophy course. These notes consist of readings by and related to ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle.

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Quote from AFL-CIO President George Meany

New Jersey (NJ)

This is a picture of George Meany, President of AFL-CIO, giving an address to the Jewish Labor Committee meeting in Atlantic City, NJ on March 26, 1960. The picture is inscribed with a quote which reads: "What we want for ourselves, we want for all humanity."