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"Montgomery, AL"

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Sin

Dr. King highlights a definition of sin according to Reinhold Niebuhr.

Letter from Mr. David Winder to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Mr. David Winder writes Dr. King in an attempt to gain an interview during one of Dr. King's upcoming visits to New York.

Telegram from Kenneth O'Donnell of the White House to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

Kenneth O'Donnell sends this telegram to Dr. King encouraging the Reverend to attend a meeting with the President of the United States and several other Civil Rights leaders.

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

MLK's Itinerary October-November 1958

Dated 1958, this calendar lists a number of speaking engagements throughout the country scheduled for Dr. King.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Kenneth Lee extends his gratitude for Dr. King's sponsorship status for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. Mr. Lee asks Dora McDonald if a meeting can be arranged between himself and Dr. King during his visit to Atlanta, Georgia in August 1967.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

SCLC Six-Month Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Thomas Offenburger, Director of Information for the SCLC Department of Information, composes a semi-annual report detailing the work of the department for Dr. King and Reverend Abernathy.

Righteousness

Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King sketches notes on "the most original thinker in Danish history."

Filing System for Illustrations

Dr. King writes notes to assist in organizing a filing system for illustrations.

God (Isaiah)

Here Dr. King references Isaiah, Chapter 44 in discussing monotheism and the "utter folly of idol worship."

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Religious Experience

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and G. K. Chesterton on the need for trying the Christian experiment to have the Christian experience.

Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

What is The OIC Institute?

The Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) Institute was founded in 1964 by Reverend Leon H. Sullivan in response to public demand for a centralized resource for economic and social progress. This brochure outlines the program's history, principles, and current executive leaders.

Old Testament History Notes

Dr. King records notes from the Old Testament of the Bible. Much of the focus is on Isaiah and the downfall of Jerusalem.

Correspondence: Letter to Dr.King from Miss Marelda G. Fontenot (Jan. 8, 1965)

Thursday, January 7, 1965

In this letter Marelda Fontenot encloses a copy of the school paper, "The Paraclete." The paper features an article about Dr. King receiving the Nobel Peace Price. She offers her sincere gratitude and admiration for Dr. King and his accomplishments.

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Anonymous Support for MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1960

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

Thursday, April 27, 1967

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.