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Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy and expresses that "the death penalty is applied to anyone who steals from his brother or carries him away in slavery."

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.


Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.


Here, Dr. King writes a theoretical view of the existence of God.

Syllabus in Preaching and Worship

This syllabus for the course "Preaching and Worship" details the topics to be covered during the course. The following key topics are included: The Preaching Ministry of the Church, The Preparation of the Sermon, and Worship.

Election of MLK to the Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Friday, January 22, 1965

Charles Merrill and Benjamin E. Mays inform the Morehouse College Board of Trustees of Dr. King's consideration for a seat on the Board to replace Dr. Colwell. This consideration is pending if this election does not cause Judge Elbert P. Tuttle to resign his seat on the Board or disqualify himself as an officer of the U. S. Court of Appeal of the Fifth Circuit.

United States National Student Association Scope Questionnaire

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

The United States National Student Association prepares to publish the second edition of SCOPE, a directory of community service projects in which students can become involved during the summer months. A questionnaire is enclosed for organizations interested in listing their program.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Jackie Robinson to MLK

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Jackie Robinson writes Dr. King to accept a position of responsibility with the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Spilman

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Spilman for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges how such funds have been allocated to combat the civil injustices faced by Negroes in America. He concludes by addressing the future social and political agendas of the SCLC.

Dr. King Outlines "If"

Dr. King expounds on the subject "if." He proclaims the word to be primary in the English language.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Telegram from MLK to Robert M. Drevs

Dr. King applauds Robert M. Drevs and the Catholic Interracial Council for selecting Bill Berry to receive the John F. Kennedy award.

Letter from MLK to Richard C. Ernst

Wednesday, August 23, 1961

Dr. King writes Richard Ernst and thanks him for his generous contribution which "has tangibly resolved a part of the difficulty we face in the legal defense of Rev. Abernathy." Dr. King highlights some the programs the SCLC has been able to implement due to contributions, such as the Citizenship School Training Center and voter registration drives.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from Mary Whiteside to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962

Ms. Whiteside, treasurer of the Democratic Club of Paseo, Washington, encloses a check to help Dr. King with "organizing and tutoring." The club decided to send the funds after reading a letter one of its members received from Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.

Letter from Johnnie Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones requests that Dr. King send $54.00 to his home to help with his bills. Mr. Jones also requests that Dr. King consider him for painting services.

Antioch College Commencement Program

Saturday, June 19, 1965

This is a program for Antioch College's 1965 commencement, at which Dr. King addressed the graduating class.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Dora McDonald Re Thich Nhat Hanh

Friday, January 27, 1967

Raphael Gould, of The Fellowship of Reconciliation, writes to Miss McDonald requesting a letter from Dr. King nominating Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Gould calls attention to the approaching deadline and the extensive documentation that must accompany the letter.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

War on Poverty

Dr. King calls for the end of poverty in the African American community through the mobilization of interracial coalitions. He states that the negative effects of discriminatory laws will not cease to end by the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bill, nor will it cease if the laws were immediately repealed, but only by the building of alliances among the black and white communities will these issues be eliminated.

Letter from the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association of the Church of God to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Rev. Curtis Barge, Rev. Claude Wyatt and Rev. Willie Barrow send Dr. King two checks as a contribution to the civil rights struggle. One check is for the SCLC and the other is for the Dallas County Voters League.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Letter from Bengt Bjerke to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Bengt Bjerke from the Legal Counsel of the Nobel Foundation informs Dora McDonald that a signature is needed for Dr. King's copyright assignment form for his Nobel Lecture.