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John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from W. P. Ketterer to MLK

Monday, November 25, 1963

W. P. Ketterer sends Dr. King a contribution to honor the late President Kennedy. He expresses his hope for other Americans to support Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from Frank M. Rudon to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

Frank Rudon requests an autographed New York metered postage from Dr. King to add to his collection.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Marcus Tullius Cicero’s “De Natura Deorum,” providing references from William Wallace’s “The Logic of Hegel.”

Letter from James Shipman to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

James Shipman writes Dr. King to request his presence at the 1st annual meeting for the Education Association for Community-Junior Colleges, as their main speaker. Shipman gives the Reverend option to choose a date convenient for him, a week in either direction from April 20, 1968.

Invitation from the Ambassador of Ethiopia to MLK

ETHIOPIA

The Ambassador of Ethiopia extends an invitation for Dr. King to attend a reception honoring Haile Selassie I, the Emperor of Ethiopia.

The Student Movement and You

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS)

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Hell-for the Liberal

Dr. King quotes a definition regarding hell. The definition states that hell is a consequence not a punishment. The notecard ends with a statement about youth's perspective of the world.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Selma, AL

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966
Nevada (NV), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from MLK to Brigitte Kirch of Germany

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
GERMANY

Dr. King thanks Brigitte Kirch for her encouraging letter.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King writes US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to inform him of the reports of "known election irregularities" he is receiving concerning the next day's Georgia Democratic primary election.

Sermon Introductions by MLK

Dr. King frames a series of introductions to sermons that includes such selections as Civilization's Great Need, Life Is What You Make It, and Why Religion?

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
GHANA, Chicago, IL

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Old Testament History Notes

ISRAEL, EGYPT

Dr. King records notes from the Old Testament of the Bible. Much of the focus is on Isaiah and the downfall of Jerusalem.

Letter from MLK to the Grand Textile Corporation

Friday, February 24, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks the Grand Textile Corporation for their contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from John Maguire to MLK

Tuesday, October 12, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Mr. John D. Maguire, on behalf of Wesleyan University's Department of Religion, writes to Dr. King inviting him to preach in their chapel.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963
GERMANY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Letter from Lawrence Caesar to Andrew Young

Saturday, March 11, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Lawrence A. Caesar writes Andrew Young with concerns about charges against Dr. King having appeared in a "Training School for Communists." He states that he simply wants information to refute these charges in order to prevent any negative impact against the movement.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
SOUTH AFRICA, UGANDA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, KENYA, TANZANIA, ZAMBIA, GUINEA, MALI, SENEGAL, NIGERIA, ALGERIA, EGYPT, LIBERIA, SIERRA LEONE, New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Herman Schuchman to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Chicago, IL

Herman Schuchman writes Dr. King on behalf of the American Orthopsychiatric Association to invite him to their annual meetings in the spring of 1968. The association is interested in presenting a program that involves the issues of war, civil rights and human rights. They request Dr. King share his intellect and experiences surrounding the civil rights issues in the United States.

MLK Question Response on Ministry and Segregation

Georgia (GA)

This document features Dr. King's listed "Question: How far is the fact that you are a minister involved in your action?" and its subsequent answer. Citing the "church...[as]...the chief moral guardian of the nation," Dr. King uses the example of the Southern Baptist Convention's hypocrisy regarding segregation.

Letter from Beatrice Schultz to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL

Beatrice Schultz responds to a letter from Dr. King and expresses her appreciation towards him for explaining his stance on "Black Power." She also encloses a contribution to further demonstrate her support of Dr. King.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964
Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Illinois (IL)

Carey B. Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority thanks Dr. King for his willingness to participate in the Forty-first Boule held in Philadelphia.