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Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

etter from Mrs. Howard Wood to MLK

Mrs. Howard Wood conveys her support to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement after reading the novel "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Leonard Zion to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965

Leonard Zion writes Dr. King stating that SCOPE (Summer Community Organization and Political Action) is organizing students and faculty at Brandeis University in Massachusetts to raise $40,000 to support him. The SCOPE project was run under the auspices of the Atlanta-based SCLC.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Strength to Love Royalty Statement

This is a detailed royalty statement from the German language edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche Verlag.

Letter from Maryknoll College to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Patrick J. Ryan, the Campaigning Committee Coordinator at Maryknoll College, requests that Dr. King provide materials such as his political views, stickers, posters and more to support his political campaign and bring political consciousness to the student body.

Letter from Ernestie Newby to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Ms. Newby asks for assistance in improving her living situation.

Southern Rural Action Project

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The Southern Rural Action Project, an initiative of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, seeks to finance and support community development in low-income areas. This progress report highlights current field projects and objectives.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Letter from Samuel A. Clarke to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

In this letter, Samuel A. Clarke, the program director of the St. Andrews Church in New York, inquires about an earlier invitation sent to Dr. King, asking him to speak at "Men's Day," 1966.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah which demonstrates the eternalness and holiness of God.

Letter from MLK to James M. Nielsen

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Nielsen that he will not be able to speak in Anacortes, Washington due to the struggle in the South. Dr. King also thanks Mr. Nielsen for congratulating him on being Time Magazine's Man of the Year.

Letter from Ann Thompson to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ann Thompson, a white woman, writes Dr. King expressing support and thanks for his recent speech on peace. Thompson states that Dr. King is one of the few great men living.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Letter from Eugene Jackson to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967

Eugene Jackson expresses his amazement with Dr. King's superb performance during his interview on "Meet the Press."

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

Rev. Frederick Hewitt of Grace United Church writes Dr. King inviting him to visit the Thousand Islands for a combination of preaching with summer vacation.

J.H. Emms to MLK

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Otherworldliness

Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Saturday, June 5, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Dawkins informs Dr. King that the Summer Community Organization and Political Education, S.C.O.P.E., stands to benefit from the involvement of the VISTA organization.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Monday, April 3, 1967

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."