Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NEPAL"

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Letter from Bill Baxter to Harry Belafonte

Friday, April 12, 1968

Bill Baxter, a public school arts teacher, addressed this letter to entertainer Harry Belafonte, following the assassination of Dr. King. The content of the correspondence expressed great admiration towards the work of Dr. King and the talents of Mr. Belafonte. Mr. Belafonte was a trusted friend and adviser of Dr. King, during the civil rights movement.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Letter from Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout invites Dr. King to eat lunch at the Chicago University faculty club.

MLK and the Alabama Boycott

This caricature of Dr. King depicts his trail from the March on Washington to his pursuing a boycott on the state of Alabama, following the Selma to Montgomery March. Gib Crockett of the Washington Star is the cartoonist for this drawing.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

Letter from Henry R. Luce to MLK

Thursday, January 30, 1964

Henry R. Luce expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's letter that will be placed in his personal archives as a "highly treasured memory."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Creger

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

Dr. King's secretary responds to Mr. Creger's request to use "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" in his book. Ms. McDonald informs the author that the Letter is being expanded in an upcoming publication, therefore all requests for reprints are being denied. The Letter would eventually be published in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in 1964.

Invitation from Aubrey T. Edwards to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Aubrey T. Edward, President of the Oakville Branch for the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to make an address during the organizations designated Human Rights year.

Letter from French Organization Regarding American Outreach

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter, dated January 23,1968, was sent among French colleagues who are in support of promoting understanding and cooperation between Protestant and Catholic educationists in America and France.

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

Saturday, December 30, 1967

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Pamphlet About the Black Panther Party

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

This pamphlet contains historical and contextual references to the Black Panther Party. It also includes a speech by John Hulett and an interview of Stokely Carmichael highlighting the political and social movements occurring in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Letter from James E. Doherty to MLK Regarding School Desegregation

Monday, September 4, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Doherty encloses an article that includes civil right leaders views on school desegregation.

Notecard Regarding Reviews on The Doctrine of God

On this notecard, Dr. King references reviews on Albert Knudson's book "The Doctrine of God." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, definitions, bible verses, books and other publications.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Notecard on the Definition of Time

On this notecard, Dr. King explores the meaning of "Time" according to modern physics and philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from James Eby to MLK

Monday, October 5, 1964

Eby invites Dr.King to speak at Miami University due to "student interest in civil rights."

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Letter from Robert Weaver to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967

Secretary Weaver responds to a former letter from Dr. King requesting assistance for an economic project sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church. He informs Dr. King to contact Mr. John Thigpen at the Atlanta Federal Housing Administration office.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Letter from Harper & Row, Publishers Regarding Royalties

Friday, October 2, 1964

Harper & Row Publishers write to inform the recipient that they deducted money from an enclosed royalty check due to an outstanding balance for books purchased.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Frank Elliott

Monday, February 4, 1963

Dora McDonald responded to Frank Elliott's letter regarding Dr. King's schedule. Additionally, She requested for Elliott to send out an annoucement to people who had been requesting Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."