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The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961
Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

Royalty Statements from Harper & Row, Publishers

Sunday, June 30, 1963
New York, NY

Harper & Row, Publishers sends Dr. King this royalty statements for sales of "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom" for the first 6 months of 1963.

Injustice

Here, Dr. King records Reinhold Niebuhr's thoughts on injustice as it relates to pride.

Letter from Robert Lee Hill to MLK

Robert Lee Hill writes to inform Dr. King of the discrimination taking place in the United States Post Office. He then requests the help of the Reverend to put an end to it.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

Friday, October 1, 1954
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

Marx

Dr. King quotes an unknown source on Marx.

Pathos and Hope

Saturday, March 3, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

Dr. King speaks about a trip to the Mississippi Delta where he first witnessed hope and pathos simultaneously.

Letter from MLK to A. K. Salz

Thursday, August 20, 1964
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Salz for his financial contribution to the SCLC and explains that the contribution will help the SCLC continue its civil rights efforts.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

The Sword That Heals

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), INDIA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Outline for Why Does History Move?

Dr. King's sermon outline references Hegel and Marx in relation to questions surrounding the concept of history.

Birthday Card from Leola Whitted to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Leola Whitted, a member of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Letter from Carl Shipley to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Carl Shipley, Head of the Republican State Committee for the District of Columbia, thanks Dr. King for his address at the National Press Club. Shipley expresses that despite the reservations of many individuals regarding Dr. King's emphasis on civil disobedience, the overall support of his speech was highly satisfactory.

Letter from Reverend C. William Billingslea to MLK

Tuesday, July 24, 1962
Chicago, IL, Albany, GA

Reverend C. William Billingslea notifies Dr. King that the Northern Christian Leadership Conference wants to assist the movement through mass rallies, speeches, fund-raising, etc. Reverend Billingslea also asks Dr. King to provide a Freedom Fighter to come and speak to the organization.

Tribute to Jimmy Lee Jackson

Friday, February 26, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King edits a draft of a eulogy he wrote in the wake of four girls killed in a bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King applauded these martyrs, for their brief yet powerful appearance on this Earth and their contribution to the "holy crusade for freedom and human dignity." Reiterating these sentiments, Dr. King edits the eulogy to fit the life story of Jimmy Lee Jackson.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
HUNGARY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), DENMARK, Connecticut (CT), Tallahassee, FL, Orangeburg, SC, Louisville, KY, Brooklyn, NY, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Telegram from Dr. Richard Moore to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965
Florida (FL), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. Richard Moore, on behalf of Bethune Cookman College, expresses support for Dr. King during the SCLC Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from John Whyte to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
New York (NY)

John Whyte, an eighth grader, describes his class's fundraising efforts for the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Monday, December 16, 1963
Rhode Island (RI), Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Resolution of the SCLC Board of Directors

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS)

The SCLC Board of Directors issues a resolution at its Tenth Annual Convention that lists what it considers "flagrant injustices" which violate the rights of American workers. As part of the resolution, the SCLC requests that Congress make corrections to the National Labor Relations Act.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Acronym: B.L.A.C.K. P.O.W.E.R.

This is a detailed acronym for the term "Black Power."

Draft Letter from MLK to Donald DuMont

This draft by Dr. King addresses the goals and similarities of the SCLC with Christian principles. He asserts that the aims of the SCLC "...are [to] work to provide those same basic needs for all men."

Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Wisconsin (WI)

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965
Iowa (IA), California (CA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Letter from Elmer A. Rovang to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Missouri (MO), VIETNAM

Elmer Rovang expresses disdain for Dr. King's views on foreign policy and space exploration. Rovang even threatens to vote for George Wallace as President in order to counter Dr. King's "destructive" ideology.

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.