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Letter from MLK to Steve Rubicz

Friday, October 5, 1962

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Steve Rubicz to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to speak at the University of Washington. Dr. King regretfully declines due to several speaking engagements on his schedule keeping him from accepting additional commitments.

Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding ?Why We Can?t Wait? Royalties

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter Campe encloses payment from Econ Verlag for ?Why We Can?t Wait? royalties.

Letter from MLK to Kjell Eide

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Eide for postponing his visit to Moscow. The Reverend postponed the trip due to the election of a Negro for mayor in Cleveland. Dr. King is hopeful that his visit can be rescheduled for mid-November.

Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Sushil Joseph to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Sushil Joseph, a student at the University of Denver, informs Dr. King of a term paper he is writing on the subject of "Church and the Race Relations." Joseph would like Dr. King to answer one of the questions he enclosed with this letter to aid him with his paper.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Social and Economic Characteristics of Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1960

The Greater Atlanta Council on Human Relations outlines demographics of the Metro-Atlanta area in 1960. The areas of focus include population distribution, sanitation, and housing conditions.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

God

Dr. King quotes Psalms 111:3 and writes that "here is the familiar emphasis of the mercy and grace of God."

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

Support Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

New York Governor, Nelson A. Rockefeller, and Happy [Rockefeller] had the opportunity to spend time with Dr. King and his family after the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremonies. Admist the renewal of personal attacks against Dr. King, Nelson Rockefeller offers his support and encouragement.

Musical Composition by C. Bosserman

This untitled musical composition by C. Bosserman alludes to the White race, urging the White race to join the human race.

Letter from William J. Connor to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Dr. King was the recipient of the correspondence from Mr. William J. Connor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Connor was honored to extend a contribution to the civil rights movement. He went on to extend courtesies to Dr. King's family and Rev. Abernathy.

Letter from Phillip L. Girard to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

In this letter, Phillip L. Girard informs Dr. King of his intent to donate Girard College to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, in the event of the Girard will being violated.

Spencer

Dr. King records a quote from Herbert Spencer’s “First Principles.”

Toward Responsible Freedom

This manuscript describes the state of the country democracy and the challenges resulting from rapid urbanization, social dislocation and complexities of technological existence. Community organization is the solution provided to establish a sense of self-reliance and local democracy.

Newspaper Article: "Giving Away a Library"

Sunday, July 10, 1966

This Chicago's Sunday AMERICAN newspaper article discusses the issue concerning the decision of the Chicago Law Institute to give the government their legal library without the consent of the membership.

Religion and Peace of Soul

Dr. King cites a quotation from Jesus Christ that discusses peace, the "chief legacy" of religion. Dr. King explains that inner peace is maintained regardless of the external adversity one endures in life. Dr. King continues to elaborate on the necessary functional relationship one must have with God. He further describes the association between good, evil, innocence and more.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Joan Daves urges Dora McDonald to provide notice of Dr. King's public appearances to Harper so that books can be sold at those events.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from MLK to Senator Phillip A. Hart

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Phillip A. Hart expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Resurrection

Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

Letter from Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

The Indian organization, Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses admiration of Dr. King's heroic struggle for civil rights in the US, along with his application of Mahatma Gandhi's methods. A bronze bust of Gandhi is offered as a gift of appreciation and a request made for placement of the statue in a children's park.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

Monday, August 21, 1967

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.