Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NIGER"

The Crozer Theological Seminary Student Chapel - Order of Service

Friday, January 27, 1950

This order of service outlines the events taken place during student chapel at The Crozier Theological Seminary. The service was guided by presiding student, Fred Eugene Stom, and focused heavily on Christian affirmations and the reciting of the ten commandments.

Letter from Dudley P. Babcock to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Dudley Babcock writes Dr. King to express his views on race relations and Dr. King's leadership role in America. Babcock also discusses the march Dr. King is planning to lead in New York to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Thursday, July 18, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

MLK's Handwritten Note Card

On this note card, Dr. King contemplated the definition of "religion". This is an example of the many note cards that reflected Dr. King's research and consequently, influenced his writings.

Letter from Israel Goldstein to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Israel Goldstein congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to the King family to visit his home in Jerusalem.

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter, dated February 9,1968, was sent to Mr.Daugherty from Dr. King. In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Daugherty for his contribution to the SCLC. He apologizes for being "tardy" in writing to him.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Monday, January 9, 1967

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Letter from Maude L. Ballou to Mrs. King about MLK Schedule

Monday, September 22, 1958

The secretary of Dr. King's first pastorate, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, sent this correspondence to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The letter addresses Dr. King's itinerary, upon his return to Montgomery, and hopes for his full recovery, following his 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers

Harvest House Limited, a publishing company, announce the release of Henry David Thoreau's essay collection regarding anti-slavery and reform.

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Letter from Norman Thomas to the New York Times Editor

Monday, August 28, 1967

Norman Thomas cites an excerpt from a story by Peter Khiss entitled "Rowan Terms Dr. King's Stand on War a Peril to Rights Gains." Mr. Thomas asserts that the statement is incorrect and that he whole "heartily" applauds Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Arthur B. Jestice

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King declines a speaking engagement at the St. Andrew's Street Baptist Church due to some "programmatic plans." Dr. King asks if it is possible to meet in the future.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

God

Dr. King quotes a passage from Psalms 77:13, which discusses the greatness of God through comparison to other gods.

Telegram from Bill Barrett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Bill Barrett sends this telegram to Dr. King notifying him of his support of the Committee Bill.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author instructs Dr. King on how he should prepare his people for the end of the world.

Executive Staff Meeting of the SCLC

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King informs the Southern Christian Leadership Conference staff of an executive staff meeting scheduled for June 22, 1967.

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Arthur McDonald

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King writes Reverend Arthur McDonald expressing appreciation for his presence in Albany. He also shares with Reverend Arthur how the non-violent battle in Albany is slowly fading yet the fight for equality is not over.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."