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Statement of Royalty Account

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

This financial statement reflects SCLC's affiliation with Motown Record Corporation.

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Dr. King's Written Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Ibarance Mann's views on death. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for refernce to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions and bible verses.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dwight Campbell

Monday, September 28, 1964

Miss McDonald regretfully informs Mr. Campbell that Dr. King is unable to attend the October 7th Methodist Youth Fellowship engagement.

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

Letter from MLK to Claes Collenberg

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere appreciation to Claes Collenberg of Sweden for his help in raising money to assist with the civil rights movement in America. He conveys to Mr. Collenberg that he will be notified of updates involving the Chicago Campaign on housing.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964

Robert Kennedy writes Dr. King requesting to interview him for an oral history program on the Kennedy Administration. Kennedy asserts, "You are obviously one of the persons who ought to be interviewed in order to get a full record of the Administration."

Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

The Lonesome Road

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Original Sin

Dr. King records his views regarding the doctrine of original sin.

Registration for the Annual Youth Retreat

Friday, May 12, 1967

This is a document from Reverend Earl Stirewalt with information on the annual Youth Retreat of the Georgia Baptist Convention. The retreat aims to aid in the spiritual growth of young men and women.

The Christian Century: Civil Rights Bill Move to Fore

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

The Christian Century expounds on the advancement of the Civil Rights Bill in the United States. The article highlights Dr. King as a "prophetic Christian leader" and details the Negros who assembled for the March on Washington. The author lists numerous reasons correlating the positive affect of allowing Negro's the right to vote.

The Mark of the Hawk

"The Mark of the Hawk" was a 1957 drama film distributed by Universal-International. The film features notable actors, Sidney Poitier and Eartha Kitt. Dr. King states that this movie is one of the "most captivating and moving productions."

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Redirecting Emotion

Dr. King writes on the redirection of emotion as a method of emotion management. He states that in order for one's emotion to be successfully redirected, one must project their emotion onto a different, unifying object, namely an ideal.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.