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Hegel

Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

Letter from Thomas H. Henderson to Rev. Wyatt T. Walker

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Thomas Henderson, president of Virginia Union University, instructs Reverend Wyatt T. Walker to provide Dr. King with the check from the office of Mr. C. C. Grant.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

Wednesday, December 9, 1964

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King to request a transcript of his speech given during the March on Washington. Gertler also discusses a book by Henry Thoreau that is to be published in the near future.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

SCLC Six-Month Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Thomas Offenburger, Director of Information for the SCLC Department of Information, composes a semi-annual report detailing the work of the department for Dr. King and Reverend Abernathy.

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

NAACP Fight For Freedom Fund and Awards Dinner

Dr. King gives the address at the 1962 NAACP Fight for Freedom Fund and Awards Dinner held at Morehouse College. Coretta Scott King is the soloist.

Letter from MLK to Edwin and Louise Flowers

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Edwin C. and Mrs. Louise M. Flowers from Dr. King, he wanted to personally thanked Mr. Edwin and Mrs. Flowers for their generous contribution to SCLC and to express his appreciation and gratitude for their support toward the Civil Right Movement.

Letter from Rene Golcochen to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Rene Golcochen offers condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Ozro T. Jones to the SCLC's C. T. Vivian

Friday, May 28, 1965

Ozro Jones, President of the International Youth Congress, writes C. T. Vivian stating that he sincerely appreciates Dr. King for accepting the invitation to speak at the International Youth Congress in Chicago.

Letter from D. F. Lewis to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

D. F. Lewis, a member of the County Line Missionary Baptist Association, commends Dr. King for "fighting on the Lord's side." The organization contributes to the SCLC to continue the fight against racial injustice in the United States.

Letter from F.A. Guilford to MLK

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press asks permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" for their third edition textbook "Free Government in the Making." He further requests to obtain the world rights to the letter for worldwide distribution.

Letter From Don Slaiman

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Man

Dr. King quotes a line from Homer's epic poem "The Iliad."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Note from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry and Julie Belafonte congratulate Dr. King on receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Harry Belafonte is an American entertainer and social activist.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Fred Lofton

Written on SCLC stationary, Fred Lofton addressed this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy. On behalf of his church, First African Baptist Church, Mr. Lofton pledged to continue to extend support for the work of SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King visited the city of Paris and was tremendously impressed with the people's interest or racial justice in the United States. Dr. King hopes that a meeting can take place to engage the people of Paris to further support the civil rights movement by providing financial aid to the SCLC.

Letter from Richard Boone Regarding Child Development Program in Mississippi

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, encloses a news release regarding the upcoming opening of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists

Monday, January 1, 1968

This document is informing prospective contributors about the Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists. Dr. King was listed to contribute to the publication with "Freedom and Equality."

Mississippi College Gets Poverty Role

Friday, October 7, 1966

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) moves to remove the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) as the sponsor of pre-school antipoverty programs in the state. Sargent Shriver announces that Rust College will receive funding to administer the Head Start program in Marshall and Lafayette Counties of Mississippi. CDGM was one of the most important Head Start initiatives in the country, providing early childhood education, nutritional services, health care and other services to thousands.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.