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Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

MLK Outline on Preaching Ministry

Dr. King outlines the development of the preaching ministry. As an aspiring minister, Dr. King expresses how he wishes to develop his own ministry and provides ideas of the message he desires to share.

Letter from Clifford Park to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

The President of the United Church of Canada, London Conference, writes Dr. King attempting to receive a notification of his availability to be the devotional speaker at their annual conference.

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

Albany Movement Support Letter from MLK to Rev. Hugh Wire

Thursday, October 11, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Reverend Wire for his participation in the Albany Movement.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Telegram from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Talk show host and columnist Irv Kupcinet invites Dr. King to make an appearance on his television panel. Mr. Kupcinet discloses knowledge of Dr. King's visit to Chicago for an announcement on July 24, 1965, and encourages the civil rights leader to appear on the show later that afternoon.

Letter from Myron Nelson, Minnie Cooper and Kathleen Roach to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

In this letter, Myron Nelson as well as Kathleen Roach invites Dr. King to come speak to the people of Eastern Long Island to up lift the African-American race.

Marvin Wachman Invites MLK to Speak at Lincoln University

Friday, August 16, 1963

Marvin Wachman, President of Lincoln University, invites Dr. King to a speaking engagement.

Letter from Harry A. Blachman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Harry Blachman writes Dr. King supporting his stance on Vietnam. He also requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the possibility of creating low-cost housing for low-income groups.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

Letter to MLK from Stanley Rice

Thursday, September 21, 1967

In this letter, Vice President Stanley Rice writes to Dr. King thanking him for subscribing to the United Business Service.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.


This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

Letter from Aziz Shihab to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Aziz Shihab offers the services of National Tours of Jordan in arranging Dr. King's trip to the Holy Land.

Poor People's Campaign Food Contribution List

This document is a list of the preliminary food contributions for the SCLC's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

Reservation Request Letter from Morehouse

Monday, February 13, 1967

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes Dr. King to inform him of the school's upcoming "Centennial activities." Hoping both he and Mrs. King will attend, he kindly urges Dr. King to RSVP immediately for the event on Friday evening. The writing on the letter indicates that Dr. Mays' request was answered via telephone.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

Draft of the Position Paper on Community Re-Creation

Saturday, April 1, 1967

This document drafts a set of intentions aimed at improving communities in America and uplifting individuals out of poverty. Proposed fundamental goals of achieving this include, a secure and adequate income, a proportionate share of decision making power, and access to the full range of human services.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

MLK Itinerary

This is Dr. King's itinerary for the period December 28 thru January 1 for an unknown year.