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Telegram from Muhammad Ali to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

This message of support from Muhammad Ali was sent to Dr. King during his stay at the County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Letter from Herbert G. Cave to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Director Dr. Herbert G. Cave represents the Department of Anesthesiology at the Harlem Hospital Center in congratulating Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Seven years earlier, in 1958, Dr. King had been a surgical patient of the hospital due to being stabbed with a letter opener while on a book tour.

Letter from John and Eva Fillion to MLK about Moral Support

Thursday, March 14, 1968

This letter dated March 14, 1968 was written to Dr. King from John and Eva Fillion. In this letter they thank Dr. King for promoting the cause of freedom and tell him how grateful they are for all of his work in the fight for justice.

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Charlie Cheese Carsons to Rev. Andrew Young

Friday, July 22, 1966

Charlie Cheese Carsons addresses Rev. Andrew Young to provide him with a painting that expresses the Civil Rights Movement and the fight for human dignity. Mr. Carsons is aware that Dr. King's attention has more important concerns which explains his reasoning for contacting Rev. Young. In addition to the painting, Mr. Carsons attaches his perceptions of prominent African Americans who served as his inspiration.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, May 12, 1965

The Program Committee of the World Convention of Churches of Christ requests Dr. King for the delivery of a major address at the Seventh Assembly in Puerto Rico. Laurence V. Kirkpatrick, the acting general secretary and friend of Reverend Andrew Young, contacts Dr. King to inquire about the status of the original invitation because the organization has yet to receive a response.

Letter from Michelle Feinberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Michelle Feinberg, a student in a special education class, writes Dr. King a letter about what she has been learning. She also asks Dr. King to send her a letter and a picture for their school.

Spurrier, William A.

Dr. King cites William Spurrier's "Guide to the Christian Faith."

Invitation from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, February 25, 1963

In this letter Harper & Row publishers are requesting Dr. King's presence at a seminar for clergymen, theologians, and laymen. The seminar will discuss how the ministry is affected by cultural changes in society. It will be a weekend retreat and Harper & Row are willing to assume all travel expenses.

Student Permanent Record of Judith Ann Jones

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The student permanent record of Judith Ann Jones lists her academic progress while attending Chowchilla Union High School in Fresno, California in 1965.

Invitation from J.E.L Graham to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

J.E.L. Graham, President of the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on the theme of Human Rights during one of the organizations quarterly meetings.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Adelman

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Adelman's letter, which included a Thomas Babington Macaulay quotation that Dr. King finds still applicable.

Letter from Alex Miselson to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

Alex Miselson suggests that Dr. King, the SCLC, and other leading civil rights group make the education of African American youth a priority.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King records notes on the individualization and participation of man.

God

Dr. King quantifies the capabilities of God's will through Job 42:2 and the affirmation that God is able do everything.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the inauguration ceremony of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Shaefer requests that Dora McDonald send two mats and a second biographical sketch of Dr. King for use in two local papers to promote Dr. King's upcoming appearance in Pennsylvania to speak for the Hadley Memorial Fund. He also asks that Dr. King's lecture topic be sent so it may be added to the program for the speech.

SCLC Participates at Chicago Conference of New Politics

Dr. King asserts that "serious distortions" from the press have defaced the image of the SCLC in regards to the organization's involvement at the Chicago Conference of New Politics. Factually, at the conference, members of the SCLC were the most active and coherent opponents of the resolution in the Middle East. The SCLC perceives that the issue in the Middle East must involve security and development. The political realities and possible methods of improvement within the Middle East are discussed and elaborated upon.

Auguste Comte

Dr. King writes of Comte's views of the relationship between the theological, the metaphysical and the scientific worlds.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

In this letter to Dr. King, Norman Thomas, a pacifist and political activist, writes to ensure that he attend a small civil rights conference in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Letter from E. R. Boynton to SCLC

Monday, March 18, 1968

Mr. Boynton inquires about a financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Fund for which he has not received a receipt.

Letter from James P. Dixon to MLK Requesting a Donation

Monday, November 20, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Dixon discusses his early life, his journey to Antioch College, and requests help from Dr. King in funding the same program that put Dixon through college.