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Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

Thursday, December 30, 1965

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

Social Ethics

Dr. King records a quote from Psalms 41:1 and connects the passage to social ethics.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

Letter from Warren Hamilton to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Warren Hamilton, president of the Student Government Association of the Tuskegee Institute, invites Dr. King to participate in their upcoming lecture series entitled "Viewpoint '68."

Letter from Robert Weaver to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967

Secretary Weaver responds to a former letter from Dr. King requesting assistance for an economic project sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church. He informs Dr. King to contact Mr. John Thigpen at the Atlanta Federal Housing Administration office.

Rejection Letter to Nusas Journal

Monday, May 24, 1965

Dr. King informs the editor of Nusas Journal that he will not be able to contribute an article.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

Hints on Religious Music for Radio

This pamphlet, written by Charles Schmitz, acknowledges the impact of music on religious radio. Schmitz maintains that music helps establish the purpose of religious radio programs and that certain musical selections have the power to create Christian mood and comfort. This pamphlet gives instructions on how best to implement music.

Invitation for MLK to Speak at Bryn Mawr College

Tuesday, January 4, 1966

The class of 1966 from Bryn Mawr College invite Dr. King to be the baccalaureate speaker for their service on Sunday May 29th. They remind Dr. King that he was scheduled to speak previously but other engagements prevented him from doing so.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Frank Elliott

Monday, February 4, 1963

Dora McDonald responded to Frank Elliott's letter regarding Dr. King's schedule. Additionally, She requested for Elliott to send out an annoucement to people who had been requesting Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Letter from John Olson to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965

John F. Olson, a fellow graduate of Boston University School of Theology, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak at Oklahoma City University.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Letter from Beth Arnold to MLK

Ms. Arnold writes to inform Dr. King that she is head of his campaign committee for a campus movement for the upcoming election. She asks for any campaign material Dr. King can provide.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Third Level (Cont.)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."

Gandharva Mahavidyalaya 18th Anniversary

Saturday, August 2, 1958

This pamphlet highlights an event being held at the Fine Arts Theater for an 18th Anniversary celebration of the "Gandharva Mahavidyalaya" music and dance ballet. Also included is a list of the board members responsible for the event, as well as information pertaining to the organization itself.

Letter to Mr. R.C. Firestone

Sunday, January 22, 1967

An unknown author writes to Mr. R. C. Firestone stating how delightful it is to hear that the Firestone Company plans to build a new plant in Albany, Ga.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Friday, May 19, 1967

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

North and South: SCLC Staff News January, 1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The January, 1967 edition of SCLC's staff newsletter shares Christmas and New Year stories from the staff members and their families. The newsletter also reports on recent activities of the organization such as a Chicago boycott, Junius Griffin's move to the Republican National Committee, a political rally, the SCLC's housing project in Chicago, a recent conference on Negro history, the situation in Grenada, Mississippi and other news items.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Letter from Rabbi Aaron Decter to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Rabbi Aaron Decter congratulates Dr. King on his demonstration in Montgomery and invites Dr. King to a dinner.

Letter from Hubert Williams to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

A member of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the increased tension between Negros and New York police.

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.