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"NORTH KOREA"

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Letter from MLK to Helga Gulbrandsen

Thursday, March 12, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Dr. King responds to an invitation to visit Oslo, Norway under the auspices of the Norwegian Fellowship in the fall of 1964. He informs Ms. Gulbrandsen that he cannot commit to accepting the invitation due to his uncertain schedule, but assures her that he will keep her invitation on file. However, Dr. King's handwritten notes found on the letter indicate that he was unable to accept the invitation.

Tenth Annual Convention

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Jackson, MS

Dr. King addresses the achievements the SCLC has accomplished over the past ten years at the Tenth Annual Convention in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King then speaks on the fact that all of the SCLC's achievements are accomplished through nonviolence.

Letter from Charles Simpson to MLK and Chauncey Eskridge

Monday, December 18, 1967
Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, VENEZUELA

Charles G. Simpson provides Dr. King with the financial outline surrounding the Stars for Freedom Reception and the Show at The Spectrum in Philadelphia.

Letter from Max Hess to MLK

Monday, May 14, 1962
California (CA)

Mr. Hess expresses his sincere admiration for Dr. King stating, "you have done more than stood fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter of Appreciation from Governor Richard J. Hughes to MLK

Thursday, August 29, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Governor of New Jersey, Richard Hughes expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his inspiring words to America on Freedom Day during Washington March.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Letter Dated 12/4/62 from MLK's Secretary to Melvin Arnold

Tuesday, December 4, 1962
New York, NY

In this correspondence to Mr. Melvin Arnold, Miss Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, informed Mr. Arnold that Dr. King was still working on his sermons for publication. She also stated that Dr. King had a meeting later that afternoon on December 12, 1962 and would like to scheduled a meeting with Rev. Wallis for earlier that day.

Letter to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize Nominations

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
London, England, SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway

The writer informs Dr. King of Dean Gunnar Helander's campaign to have L. John Collins nominated for the 1968 Nobel Peace Prize. He requests that Dr. King nominate Collins for this prestigious award.

Letter from James W. Sheaffer to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

James Sheaffer, of Lycoming College's Department of Music, invites Dr. King to return to the college for another visit. Sheaffer also offers to arrange fundraising opportunities for the SCLC.

A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), FRANCE, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Michigan (MI), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Washington, D.C., NETHERLANDS, UNITED KINGDOM, CANADA, SWITZERLAND, INDIA, Cleveland, OH

This pamphlet is from Dr. King's undergraduate alma mater, Morehouse College. The President of the institute, Benjamin E. Mays, is the author of , "A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse" which outlines the progress made during his presidency.

Letter from Marc Steel to Rev. R.D. Abernathy about a Term Paper

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Baltimore, MD

Marc Steel, a high school sophomore from Maryland, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy, requesting information on his role in the Civil Rights Movement. This student sought to acquire a narrative of Rev. Abernathy and his goals for SCLC, in order to complete a term paper.

Letter from John Sayre to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Sayre of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation thanks Dr. King for the autographed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

Connecticut (CT), New York (NY), Washington (WA)

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Letter from J. Ross Flanagan to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King is invited by the Interreligious Committee on Vietnam to speak at a mass meeting in Washington, DC. A handwritten notation indicates that Dr. King cannot accept the invitation.

Letter from H. M. Joshi to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
INDIA, AFGHANISTAN

H. M. Joshi of India communicates with Dr. King following Dr. King's address at Howard University on the subject of nonviolence. He informs Dr. King about Khan Abdul Ghafar Khan and his influence as a nonviolent soldier in India. Joshi also requests a combination of Dr. King's statements and publications surrounding nonviolence.

Letter from Frank Elliot to MLK

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

This letter is discussing the manuscript and galley proofs that will be sent to Dr. King before his trip to the West Indies. Frank Elliot suggest to Dr. King to search for the references in the galley proof, since no foot notes will be provided. He also request that Dr.King proof read "Antidotes of Fear" and provide a preface if he has spare time to do so.

Letter from MLK to Tore Staav

Monday, April 25, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his sincerest gratitude to Mr. Tore Staav, the editor of Vi Magazine, for his unwavering support and sponsorship during the Civil Rights Movement.

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethel Sebastian

Friday, September 21, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Sebastian that Dr. King will make inquiries about her father when he returns to Albany and hopes the two will reunite soon.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes that the answer to F. W. H. Myers' question about whether the universe is friendly lies at the basis of religion. His cites E. C. Wilm's "The Problem of Religion."

Anaximenes

Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.