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"NORTH KOREA"

Application for Community Action Program

Friday, May 26, 1967
Alabama (AL)

This grant request form from the Office of Economic Opportunity provides information regarding SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee in Alabama.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "The Ultimate Doom of Evil." The text is derived from a Biblical text, which states that one should not fret over evil doers because God is our vindicator.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. M. Lawson Jr.

Friday, October 25, 1963
Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Rev. Lawson to express his appreciation for the financial contribution to the SCLC from Protestant missionaries. Dr. King states that they will seek to make sure that a student involved in a recent tragedy in Birmingham, Alabama benefits from the contribution.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Letter from Rev. Celestine Fernado to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY)

The Editor of the Ceylon Churchman, Reverend Celestine Fernando, request a copy of Dr. King's letter from jail to publish in the magazine. Reverend Fernando is certain that this publication is a great message and will allow the church to re-evaluate its work.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to Dora McDonald Regarding Board Meeting

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Dr.Mays informs Ms.McDonald that it is imperative that Dr. King attends the annual board meeting,"since this is his first time being with us".

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

Notecard- Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Augustine's view on sin.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C., California (CA), Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Telegram from Milton Powell to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA

Upon Dr. King's recent arrest, Milton Powell, the executive chairman of CORE, sends his whole-hearted support on behalf of the organization.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
Memphis, TN, California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

Royalty Statement for Japanese Edition of Stride Toward Freedom

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York (NY), JAPAN, New York, NY

Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Japanese edition of Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," including the number of copies sold in 1966.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Geneva, Switzerland, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, South Africa, ISRAEL

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Letter from Richard Carlin to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 18, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Carlin offers the use of an original song that he composed after the death of President Kennedy. He finds the lyrics timely for the unfortunate death of Dr. King. He expresses his desire to make a notable contribution to the Fund in memory of Dr. King once he finds a publisher.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Telegram to MLK Regarding a Social Eruption in Chicago

Tuesday, June 14, 1966
Chicago, IL

Junius Griffin sends Dr. King a typed version of his statement on the violence occurring in a predominately Puerto Rican neighborhood in Chicago. Through the incident, Dr. King notes the callousness of law enforcement in the area.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Pickett

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Pickett's poem and some questions that she sent. He offers condolences for the loss of her husband and promises that the "redemptive suffering of few brings new life to many."

Newspaper Article Concerning Peace in North Vietnam

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
CANADA

This document contains two articles from various newspapers. The first article concerns the call of South Vietnamese Roman Catholic Bishops for the end of U.S. aggression towards North Vietnam. The second article concerns a South Vietnamese Roman Catholic woman who has asked the Pope to become a hostage for a day.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

California (CA), Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

The Christian Sense of Individuality

Dr. King quotes from "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" by Reinhold Niebuhr, on the Christian sense of individuality.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Turkenkopf to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New Jersey (NJ), Oslo, Norway

Overwhelmed by the news of MLK winning the Noble Peace Prize, Mrs. Turkenkopf expresses her congratulations to Mrs. King.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.