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"NORTH KOREA"

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Letter from MLK to Kjell Eide

Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Oslo, Norway, Cleveland, OH

In this letter, Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Eide for postponing his visit to Moscow. The Reverend postponed the trip due to the election of a Negro for mayor in Cleveland. Dr. King is hopeful that his visit can be rescheduled for mid-November.

Letter from Reverend C. William Billingslea to MLK

Tuesday, July 24, 1962
Chicago, IL, Albany, GA

Reverend C. William Billingslea notifies Dr. King that the Northern Christian Leadership Conference wants to assist the movement through mass rallies, speeches, fund-raising, etc. Reverend Billingslea also asks Dr. King to provide a Freedom Fighter to come and speak to the organization.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK

VIETNAM

The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Colorado (CO)

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Detroit, MI

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Letter from MLK to Theodore W. Kheel

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King graciously declines attorney and noted labor mediator Theodore Kheel's invitation to sit on the Dais at the International Longshoremen's 50th Anniversary Dinner due to a previous commitment in Berlin, Germany.

Blue Spiral Notebook

North Carolina (NC)

Contained in this notebook is a draft of Dr. King's statement to Judge James E. Webb following his arrest during the Rich's Magnolia Tea Room Sit-In. There is also an outline of a letter to female students who were arrested during the sit-in. On other pages a child practices handwriting.

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

Three Stages of Christological Controversy

Dr. King lists three stages of Christological controversy. The third is the "relation" between the former two.

Letter from MLK to T. C. Johnson

Monday, September 9, 1963
Iowa (IA)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. T. C. Johnson for her contribution to the SCLC and encloses an official receipt for her gift. King states, "Without your moral support we would be caught in a dungeon of despair."

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

Letter from Ada Krozier to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, New York (NY)

Ada Krozier encloses a contribution to Dr. King for his work in the civil rights movement and his stance on the Vietnam War. She feels that Dr. King's position is an opportunity to pursue peace and call an end to the war.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
GEORGIA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

Monday, December 4, 1967
VIETNAM, New York, NY

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

Letter from David R. Echeldfer to MLK

New York (NY)

David Echeldfer sends a copy of the Time Magazine with Dr. King on the cover and requests his autograph, and for King to return the magazine by mail.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT)

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Form Letter Regarding the Civil Rights Movement

In this form letter the author talks about the necessity to eliminate ignorance.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

Letter to MLK from Ida Kinney

California (CA), Mississippi (MS)

Ida Kinney sends Dr. King a letter expressing her support for his work. She informs him that she would like to begin making monthly financial donations toward the movement.

Telegram from MLK regarding OEO

Monday, October 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sent this telegram to several members of the House of Representatives urging them to approve a vote on the Office of Economic Opportunity and the War on Poverty.