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"NORTH KOREA"

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Worship

Dr. King describes Edgar S. Brightman’s four attitudes of worship in “Philosophy of Religion.”

Letter from Mrs. Lewis Cooper to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 22, 1967
Chicago, IL, Nebraska (NE)

Mrs. Cooper writes Ms. McDonald to invite Dr. King to speak at the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago in January 1968.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "A Stride to Freedom"

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, GERMANY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses the German royalties, received from J.G. Onken, for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" German language edition.

Letter from Viola Burrell to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Burrell writes to Dr. King, expressing her concern for black people in the work environment.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet encloses a clipping on the Soldier Field Rally for Dr. King. Kupcinet closes by requesting the Reverend's appearance on his television show.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA, CUBA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Socialism for the Rich, Free Enterprise for the Poor

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), VIETNAM, Birmingham, AL

In a speech to the Hungry Club at the Atlanta YMCA, Rev. Andrew Young, Executive Director of the SCLC, asserts that the American economy is a system of "socialism for the rich and free enterprise for the poor," a contest between the "haves and have-nots." He claims that the space program and the Vietnam War are threats to domestic poverty programs.

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

North Carolina (NC), INDIA

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King's sermon outline references the Biblical text in Ezekiel 22:30.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

The Voter Registration Project of Winston-Salem Presents MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

This program details the schedule and many sponsors of a Voter Registration Project event in North Carolina, in which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

John Cowles Views on Asia

Dr. King records the views of John Cowles, chairman of Look magazine and president of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. Cowles stated that the US is losing its grip on "the minds of men" worldwide, thanks in part to the US' inability to express sympathy for the Asian community after World War II.

Letter from Robert M. Hatch to MLK

Friday, April 9, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Hatch of the Diocese of Western Massachusetts responds to Dr. King's request for "financial assistance" on behalf of SCLC. Rev. Hatch cheerfully tells Dr. King that the Diocesan Council has agreed to answer the request favorably, and he references an enclosed check for two thousand dollars.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
SWITZERLAND

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Vincent

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude, to Mrs. Vincent and the Millinery Workers Union, for their support and hard work towards the SCLC.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961
INDIA, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
California (CA), Berkeley, CA

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Letter from Beatrice Smith to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Beatrice Smith encloses a contribution to Dr. King and explains the interest and sympathy in Dr. King's work. She also expresses concern for the boycott of Alabama product stating that it might result in "more enemies than friends."