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Telegram from MLK to Sammy Davis Jr.

California (CA)

Dr. King requests that Mr. Davis ask Frank Sinatra to serve as Honorary Host at the SCLC Benefit Cocktail Party held in Miami.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from Mrs. Berdeax to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mrs. Berdeax of Ohio informs Dr. King that she supports his position on the war in Vietnam and is ashamed of her country.

Letter from MLK to Rev. William A. Dennis

Monday, January 20, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN

Dr. King requests the presence of Reverend Dennis at a SCLC Executive Board meeting in Atlanta, GA. Reverend Dennis responds by stating he will not be able to attend, but he will send someone in his place.

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Colorado (CO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965
Selma, AL, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "The Ultimate Doom of Evil." The text is derived from a Biblical text, which states that one should not fret over evil doers because God is our vindicator.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Friday, June 7, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968
SWEDEN

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

Why Pay for Segregation?

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Arkansas (AR)

In this appeal to the public, the author personifies segregation and urges Negroes to stop spending money at any store that practices segregation until segregation is dead and buried.

SCLC Staff

Thursday, March 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

This is a list of the SCLC staff members, their positions, and their responsibilities.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964
South Africa, Oslo, Norway

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Thursday, February 9, 1961
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. announces their recent involvement with President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from C. B. Kelley to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Ohio (OH), Massachusetts (MA), Cincinnati, OH, VIETNAM

C. B. Kelley shares his disagreement with Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Letter from MLK to Prisoner James C. Guyton

Wednesday, January 24, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King sends his prayers to Mr. Guyton in his confinement and informs him that he will contact him when he has additional information.

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details an amended budget for the SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
New York (NY)

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Letter to MLK from The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Chicago, IL

Emma Kramer, the Secretary of the Speakers Bureau, writes to Dr. King to negotiate the details of his presentation at the University of Illinois.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.