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Letter from James H. MacDonald to MLK

Friday, June 16, 1967

James MacDonald asks Dr. King to send a statement regarding his personal struggles to assist with the sermon MacDonald will deliver to his congregation. MacDonald also seeks advice on how to integrate his church.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Letter from The Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club to Dr. King

Thursday, October 2, 1958

Samuel Baskerville, of the Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club, wrote to Dr. King out of sympathy, for his nearly fatal stabbing at a department store in Harlem. Mr. Baskerville, on behalf of his organization, conveyed their delight in knowing of Dr. King's survival, per various press releases.

Terminated Employee Asks for a Meeting with the SCLC Board

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Meredith Gilbert writes to William Rutherford regarding her termination in January 1968 from employment with SCLC.

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Telegram from MLK to Elijah Muhammed

Monday, August 14, 1967

Dr. King commends Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War. He encourages Elijah Muhammed to convince Ali to speak at the upcoming Tenth Annual Convention of SCLC.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

Letter from Leonard E. Loper to MLK

Saturday, June 8, 1963

Leonard Loper, of Mount Zion Baptist Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can be the keynote speaker for the church's Men's Day service.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."

Letter from Joan Baez's Law Firm to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

Singer Joan Baez's law firm expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's recent correspondence.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Letter from Douglas Straton to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Douglas Straton, Chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Oregon, invites Dr. King to participate in their Distinguished Visiting Lectureship Program. The department would appreciate Dr. King's presentation of three lectures and attendance at a breakfast meeting with the town clergy. They offer him a $500 honorarium and request that he consider coming the following school year.

Herbert Coulton Appointed Director of Affiliates of SCLC

Mr. Herbert Coulton is appointed the Director of Affiliates for the SCLC.

Injustice

Here, Dr. King records Reinhold Niebuhr's thoughts on injustice as it relates to pride.

Briefing Sheet on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues

This document contains the briefing notes on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Letter from MLK to James Farmer

Thursday, April 30, 1964

Dr. King sends James Farmer a complimentary copy of a journal on the works of the SCLC.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 9:17, a passage from the Bible concerning sin.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Monday, January 8, 1968

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Letter From Rabbi Robert E. Goldburg to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

Mr. Goldburg congratulates Dr. King on a recent article about civil rights that Dr. King wrote for "The Nation."

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.