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MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

Letter from George A. Wiley to Rev. Andrew Young

Monday, March 25, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

George A. Wiley writes Reverend Andrew Young and other staff of the SCLC regarding National Welfare Rights Organization's (NWRO) participation with the Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Wilma Wolsink to MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1966
NETHERLANDS

Wilma Wolsink, an eleven-year-old girl from Holland, writes to Dr. King to express her support. She also requests an autographed photograph.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Washington, D.C., Indiana (IN), Birmingham, AL

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Schleiermacher's Meaning of Religion

Dr. King cites a quotation from Friedrich Schleiermacher's perception of the meaning of religion. Schleiermacher asserts that the soul is dissolved in the immediate feeling of the infinite and eternal. Dr. King notes that in order for one to understand the externals of religion, we must first have the inner experience.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SWEDEN

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.

Letter from Leonard E. Smith to MLK

Friday, October 6, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC)

Leonard Smith writes to Dr. King concerning a new venture of the National Sharecroppers Fund, which seeks to invest Negro business captial in Southeastern farming areas to benefit the rural poor.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

Sunday, April 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Awake America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A poem by Jerry Peace calls for Americans to wake up and address current world issues.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM, PUERTO RICO

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Letter from Bill Baxter to Harry Belafonte

Friday, April 12, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Bill Baxter, a public school arts teacher, addressed this letter to entertainer Harry Belafonte, following the assassination of Dr. King. The content of the correspondence expressed great admiration towards the work of Dr. King and the talents of Mr. Belafonte. Mr. Belafonte was a trusted friend and adviser of Dr. King, during the civil rights movement.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Indiana (IN)

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
New York, NY

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

The Christian Century: Civil Rights Bill Move to Fore

Wednesday, June 5, 1957
Washington, D.C.

The Christian Century expounds on the advancement of the Civil Rights Bill in the United States. The article highlights Dr. King as a "prophetic Christian leader" and details the Negros who assembled for the March on Washington. The author lists numerous reasons correlating the positive affect of allowing Negro's the right to vote.

Letter from Moisa Bulboaca to MLK

Tuesday, December 14, 1965
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, ROMANIA, HUNGARY, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, New York (NY), New York, NY

Moisa Bulboaca thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence in which Dr. King expressed his interest in visiting and preaching in Romania. In the event Dr. King actually formulates a trip, Bulboaca suggests accompanying if possible. The author explains their background in "sacred music" and provides a brief biography for consideration. They offer to organize a musical selection to fit Dr. King's sermons.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Support Negro Business

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

This ad by Operation Breadbasket contains a letter from Dr. King promoting support of Negro businesses.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Oklahoma (OK), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

Critique of the Social Gospel

Dr. King used this outline while studying at Crozer Theological Seminary. The topics listed include: Social Contribution to Christianity, Contribution to Christian Social Philosophy, and the Sore Points of the Social Gospel.

Three Year Proposal for the Renewal of the Negro Church in America

Chicago, IL

In this three-year proposal for the renewal of the Negro Church, there are several line items and subfields describing various ways in which this goal may be accomplished.

Financial Report of the SCLC Home Office - Atlanta, GA, 1965-1966

Monday, August 8, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., North Carolina (NC), Nashville, TN, Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Jesse B. Blayton provides a summarized financial statement of cash receipts and disbursements for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from July 1, 1965 to and including, June 30, 1966. This statement lists the allocations of funds for Operation Breadbasket, voter registration and political education initiatives, legal defense, and more.