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National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN), New York, NY

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

Geneva, Switzerland

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

The Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

This program commemorates the inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster as the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Letter from MLK to a Young John Lewis

Tuesday, March 5, 1963
Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes John Lewis, the future activist and U.S. Congressman, to thank him for a previous letter and to offer financial assistance. He discusses the possibility of Mr. Lewis joining his staff in Alabama.

Letter from James P. Twomey to P. N. Brownstein

Monday, September 23, 1968
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

James Twomey writes P. N. Brownstein to express his pleasure in receiving Mr. Brownstein's letter informing him of the $4,000,000 the FHA-HUD has allocated for the housing rehabilitation program that Dr. King proposed.

What is The OIC Institute?

Philadelphia, PA

The Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) Institute was founded in 1964 by Reverend Leon H. Sullivan in response to public demand for a centralized resource for economic and social progress. This brochure outlines the program's history, principles, and current executive leaders.

Lette from Alta Yount to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Alta Yount expresses her approval of a speech that Dr. King delivered. She also requests some copies of it.

Letter from MLK to Nelson Rockefeller

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King takes the opportunity to thank New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller for his tremendous contribution to SCLC. He expresses that the struggle couldn't have survived without friends like Gov. Rockefeller and looks forward to their September 7, 1962 meeting.

Letter from Mr. Joseph Mermel to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 18, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter to Mrs. King, Mr. Mermel informs her that a sculptress, Sally Stengel, would like to make a sculpture of Dr. King, given he is one of "two outstanding leaders of the Negro race."

Letter from MLK to Maj Palmberg

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dr. King's informs Miss Palmberg that he is unable to accept her invitation to visit Finland.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK's Book Draft

Thursday, January 5, 1967
New York, NY

Genevieve Young, from Harper & Row Publishers, expresses concern regarding an outline for Dr. King's upcoming book. She suggests an alternative way to frame the outline, and advises Joan Daves to use her discretion as to whether or not the memorandum should be passed on to Dr. King.


Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Letter from Robert H. Goldsmith to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM, Virginia (VA)

Robert Goldsmith sends a contribution and expresses his support of Dr. King's Christian methods to attain full integration and civil rights. He discusses Dr. King's campaign to end the Vietnam War and asserts that the country is engaged in an immoral action in Southeast Asia.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Senator Robert Kennedy declines Dr. King's invitation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's 10th Anniversary Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962
Oklahoma (OK)

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

Two Americas

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

This essay highlights the realities of poverty stricken aliens in an affluent society. Through its examination of Negro-white relations, urban riots, and the War on Poverty, the author insists that the nonviolent struggle for civil rights must continue.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Get well letter from Nicholas Altomerianos to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958
New York, NY

Nicholas Altomerianos, Mayor of Charles Evan Hughes High School in New York, sent Dr. King this get well letter on behalf of its faculty and students.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962
Albany, GA

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
Atlanta, GA

The Method of Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical thought that attempts to understand the unparalleled identity of human's in relation to nature. Dr. King references this ideology with a handwritten note.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York, NY, San Francisco, CA, Detroit, MI

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.

MLK's Sermon Outline

Dr. King categorizes different types of Christians.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.