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Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This royalty statement reflects the amount earned for the Japanese edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter From David Fishman to MLK

Monday, January 28, 1963

Mr. Fishman, a disciple of Robert Ingersoll, praises Dr. King for a lecture he delivered at Orchestra Hall in Chicago Illinois. He concludes by comparing his personal religious beliefs to common pedagogy.

A Born Again Christian writes MLK

The author of this letter, signed "Born Again Christian," urges Dr. King to set his ministry more on God rather than participating in civil rights demonstrations.

Letter from F. N. Campbell to Ralph David Abernathy

In this letter F. N. Campbell commends Abernathy for his dignified and effective handling of the first phase of the People's March in Washington, DC. It is his hope to utilize the climate of response following Dr. King's assassination. To this end, he proposes the establishment of a foundation in memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Moral and Religious Imperatives for Brotherhood

Saturday, February 9, 1963

Dr. King shares how important it is for America to obtain racial integration.

Capitalism

Dr. King illustrates a relationship between capitalism and anarchism.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Letter from Stanley Becker to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Stanley Becker, the principal at the Amsterdam School in New York, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Campaign for a World Constitution Leaflet

This pamphlet announces a World Constitutional Convention to be held in Switzerland. Dr. King, who was among the signers of a "Call for a Constitutional Convention," is quoted in the leaflet stating that a world government would lessen tensions.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Mills to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

This letter from a couple in Austin, Texas is a "message of encouragement" to Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, recently appointed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from Soma Ragir to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Soma Ragir extends her support for Dr. King's planned Poor People's March on Washington, but expresses her desire for heightened political organization in order to elect black congressional members who can ultimately "reform our social system."

Letter from Wilson Woodbeck to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967

Mr. Woodbeck invites Dr. King to be an honorary member of the National Association of Negro Musicians. For Dr. King’s review, several letters are enclosed complimenting the organization on their work and contribution to society.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Royalty Statement for Strength to Love

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Joan Daves issues this royalty statement for a German language edition of Dr. King's Strength to Love. The statement includes the amount earned and number of copies sold.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. thanks Dr. King for his previous telegram in support of the discharge petition on home rule for the District of Columbia. The home rule gives some of congress' power over the district to the local government. The petition was finally approved in 1973.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 28, 1965

In this letter Ms. Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for sending her the commission check from the "Saturday Review" SELMA piece. Daves goes on to say that Dr. King's article on the Watts riots was not published in several publications due to "scheduling problems", but will run in the "Saturday Review".

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 3, 1964

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her conversation with Harper & Row concerning the advertisements for the book "Why We Can't Wait." She describes their negotiations and asks for further guidance.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Peace and Freedom Party

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The Peace and Freedom Party was originally established in the Northern region of California in 1967. This pamphlet features the party's political platform in addition to voter registration procedures.