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etter from Mrs. Howard Wood to MLK

Florida (FL), Maryland (MD)

Mrs. Howard Wood conveys her support to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement after reading the novel "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from University of Saskatchewan's Student Union to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
CANADA, Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

A representative of the Student Union at the University of Saskatoon writes Dr. King inviting him to speak about the Civil Rights Movement. The representative asserts "the problems which you face are a matter for attention of the entire world."

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967
New York, NY

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Letter to MLK from Marie King

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
Washington (WA)

Marie King writes to express her support for Dr. King.

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. C.A. Echols

Wednesday, July 14, 1965
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dora McDonald responds to Rev. C.A. Echols on behalf of Dr. King. She encloses a statement from Dr. King which was pubished in the "Massachusetts Review" for Echol's graduate studies.

Shattered Dreams and Unfulfilled Hopes

SPAIN

Dr. King based this sermon on unfulfilled hopes and dreams. He focused on the story of the Apostle Paul and his wish to journey to Spain. Paul did eventually go to Spain but "as a prisoner and not as a free man." Dr. King told his congregation that they all faced unfulfilled dreams at some point in their lives.

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Thomas Aquinas' "The Summa Theologica."

Telegram to Dr. Benjamin Spock from MLK

Monday, May 29, 1967
Cleveland, OH, SWITZERLAND

In May 1967 Dr. King sends a telegram to Dr. Spock (an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the biggest best-sellers of all time) while he is in Geneva to praise him on taking a stance on controversial issues.

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Letter from Norman R. Snook to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Norman Snook of the United Christian Center invites Dr. King to come preach at the Ohio State University United Chapel.

Letter from MLK to Robert B. Shaw

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
Washington (WA)

Dr. King informs Mr. Robert B. Shaw that his commitment to the Civil Rights Movement and hectic schedule hindered him from attending the rally.

Letter of Gratitude from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Maurice A. Dawkings, the Assistant Director for Civil Rights, expresses gratitude for the work Dr. King does.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Monday, May 29, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Hartford, CT, Connecticut (CT)

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Negro Population

Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA)

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Friday, January 11, 1957
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

Friday, November 10, 1967

This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

Memo to Organizations Interested in the Success of the Anti-Poverty Program

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Richard W. Boone requests Dr. King's support in assisting with the success of the Anti-Poverty Program.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA, Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Letter from Bertha Baker to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Pennsylvania (PA)

Bertha Baker requests Dr. King's assistance regarding discrimination issues involving employment, private industry, housing and education. Mrs. Baker details inequalities in numerical form and concludes with a request to join Dr. King's organization.

News from the SCEF

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Saturday, November 12, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald encloses biographical sketches to accompany Dr. King's lecture, "The Future of Integration."