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Royalty Statement re: Why We Can't Wait

Thursday, December 31, 1964
New York, NY

This royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" has an itemization of royalties earned.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Letter from US Citizen to MLK

"A citizen who loves the country God let him own," writes to Dr. and Mrs. King criticizing them on their views on Vietnam and their ministerial work in regards to Christianity.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967
Connecticut (CT)

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Archibald

California (CA)

Dr. King informs Mrs. Archibald of the importance of continuously fighting for peace, not only domestically, but in foreign affairs as well.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Letter from James H. Ridgely to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Attorney Ridgely requests that Dr. King sends his social security number in order for Addison H. Flournoy's federal estate tax return to be filed.

Letter from Herman Will, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Herman Will, Associate General Secretary for the Division of Peace and World Order, General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church expresses his appreciation to Dr. King.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
Kentucky (KY)

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.


Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil Jones

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Wayne Williams writes to follow up with Virgil Dwight Jones on his recently filed charge with the Chicago Fair Employment Practices Commision Office.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Central Methodist Church Program

Sunday, August 18, 1957
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks at the Central Methodist Church after a Sunday service regarding the work that he has done for the community.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962
London, England, Pittsburgh, PA

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This pamphlet outlines the mission and objectives of SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The program was designed to inform citizens about how to become full citizens in America. SCLC also addresses the recruitment of potential teachers to assist with the curriculum.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart


Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Telegram to MLK from Wolfgang Grimmig

Berlin, Germany

Dr. King gets invited to a lecture tour that will take place during the spring of 1966.

Letter from Time Magazine Publisher Bernhard Auer to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Bernhard Auer communicates his disappointment that Dr. King will be unavailable to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine.

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Tuesday, October 2, 1962
Oregon (OR), Washington (WA)

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.



Dr. King documents background information on Greek philosopher Anaximander. Over five note cards, he outlines key principles of Anaximander's philosophy under the subject titles "Metaphysics" and "His Views on Biology."

The Synagogue Council of America

This pamphlet provides information on the Synagogue Council of America, including its goals and financing methods. The Council was formed to unite the orthodox, conservative and reform Jewish movements into a single group.