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"Nashville, TN"

The Ben Bella Conversation

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.

Letter from MLK to Anna Frank

Monday, May 7, 1956

Dr. King informs Mrs. Frank, assistant to Dr. Chalmers, of his travel arrangements to New York where he is set to speak at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund dinner.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Thursday, August 22, 1963

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Howe Fears Draft Of Too Many Students

This article discusses how Education Commissioner Harold Howe complained to a House Special Education Sub-Committee that more than a third of graduate students could expect to be drafted in the following year due to the changes in the Selective Service law.

Cosomological Argument for God

Dr. King references the cosmological argument for God.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card

Frank and Ann Smallwood enclose their annual membership fees for the SCLC. The Smallwoods express that they know Dr. King will experience financial difficulties because of his stand on the Vietnam War and they wish they could contribute more.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Neiman

In this document, Dr. King writes a draft letter to Mr. Neiman thanking him for offering his legal services to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He advises Mr. Neiman to forward his employment information to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

A Memorandum Regarding the Cooperative Housing and Rehabilitation Program

In this memorandum from James P. Twomey, executive director of the Community Renewal Foundation Inc., writes to Mr. Donald Jordan of the Federal Housing Administration in regards to the building of cooperative housing and rehabilitation centers. The memorandum address certain issues such as the mortgage for the homes as well as the architects and attorneys

Memorandum from Dr. King

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses this memorandum to the organizers of a "Stall In" at the World's Fair. He advises against the demonstration and only advises it when "persistent attempts at good faith negotiations have completely failed."


Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Ben-Zion Ilan to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

The American Representative of the General Federation of Labor in Israel writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize. He also reiterates a request for Dr. King to visit Israel as the guest of Histadrut, the Executive Director of the organization.

Letter from MLK to South African Embassy

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Having been invited to South Africa by the National Union of South African Students and the Students' Visiting Lecturers Organization of the University of Cape Town, Dr. King writes the South African Embassy initiating the process of apply for a visa.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Conditions for Entering the Kingdom

Dr. King opens these sermon notes by discussing a child's behavior and actions. According to King, "a child has the inexhaustible capacity to forgive" and is inquisitive, honest, and open-minded. These are characteristics that adults should possess, which would help them gain entry into the Kingdom.

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

Letter from Peter Seeger to MLK

American folk singer, songwriter and activist Peter Seeger shares with Dr. King a previous experience appearing on a television program in Tokyo. Seeger recommends the program as an excellent means to communicate with the Japanese people.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"


Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Bible regarding reason.

Letter from Thomas T. Krampf to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

New Jersey resident Thomas T. Krampf expresses support for Dr. King's leadership and viewpoints on race relations, morality, and equality. Krampf encloses a self-written story, "The Rosebuds," which speaks to the "'oneness' and the peaceful 'togetherness' of all humanity."

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.


Here, Dr. King records Reinhold Niebuhr's thoughts on injustice as it relates to pride.

Term Paper Notes

During Dr. King's matriculation through Crozer Theological Seminary, he writes a term paper that contains results of a historical study on Mesopotamia and Egypt.

Letter from Jay Richard Kennedy to MLK

Monday, October 28, 1963

Jay Kennedy encloses a copy of a picture and a transcript from a television program that included Dr. King. He thanks Dr. King for an earlier letter and explains that their views are aligned. Kennedy also briefly discusses civil rights in America and the federal government.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.