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Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee of the Kennett Consolidated School, contacts Ms. McDonald in an attempt to reschedule an event cancelled by Dr. King.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964

Senator Joseph S. Clark informs Dr. King of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's support.

Hegel

Dr. King documents a quote from philosopher Thomas Hegel regarding God and knowledge before commenting with his own thoughts.

Correspondence: Telgegram from W.A. Flowers to Dr.King

Friday, September 9, 1966

This telegram from W.A. Flowers is offering words of support and encouragement to Dr. King and the movement. Flower discourages the behavior leaders, such as Stokley Carmichael and hopes Dr. King stands firm to his conviction to better all man kind.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Dinkar Sakrikar, General Secretary of Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for accepting a Mahatma Gandhi memorial gift. The memorial gift includes Indian children's toys, a set of Gandhi's books, and a bronze statue of Gandhi to be installed in a children's park in the United States.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to MLK about Court Case

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

Chauncey Eskridge, Dr. King's legal counsel, sent this message requesting the signatures of Dr. King's parents on a legal document. The latter part of the message asks for Rev. King, Sr. to trust the expertise of Attorney Eskridge.

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Letter from Representative Carl Perkins to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Carl Perkins informs Dr. King that he supports fighting against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Fred Lofton

Written on SCLC stationary, Fred Lofton addressed this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy. On behalf of his church, First African Baptist Church, Mr. Lofton pledged to continue to extend support for the work of SCLC.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

Anglicanism

This note card briefly compares Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Original Sin

From "The Epistle of the Romans," Dr. King records Karl Barth's observations regarding original sin, which are compared to views of the Bible, Saint Augustine and the Reformers.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Marian S. Dockhorn

Friday, April 24, 1964

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Marian S. Deckhorn's letter concerning the invitation extended to him and Coretta Scott King for the Bucks Count World Peace Fair. Dr. King notifies Mrs. Deckhorn that they will be unable to attend on the suggested date due to his international travel to Berlin.

J.H. Emms to MLK

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Religion and Science

Dr. King writes about the different perspectives of the moralist and scientist, saying a person can be both.

Memorandum from William M. Gray

Friday, April 5, 1968

This memorandum from William M. Gray lists the address to which mourners should send acknowledgements following Dr. King's death.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Letter from Robert A. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, November 17, 1964

Robert A. Jackson, Minister for Knox's Church, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the many honors bestowed upon him. Minister Jackson invites Dr. King to come speak at either the Polio Dinner or the 100th Anniversary of the Church Home.

Outline for "Levels of Love"

In this handwritten outline, Dr. King highlights the subject of love. The document titled, “Levels of Love," focused on four categories: utilitarian love, romantic love, humanitarian love and Christian love.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter From MLK to Ada Hill

Thursday, July 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hill for her letter commending his letter from the Birmingham jail. He assures Mrs. Hill her encouraging words will help give him the courage to continue in the struggle to make brotherhood a reality.

Letter from M. A. Lockhart to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1963

M. A. Lockhart writes Dr. King to express pleasure in speaking with Dr. King during his visit to New York. Lockhart expresses interest in the development of the Selective Patronage program and asks that Dr. King make contact if he is in New York.

Letter to MLK from Bertha Fiege Regarding Speech at Riverside Church

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Bertha Fiege is commending Dr. King on his speech at Riverside Church. She feels he serves great importance to furthering unity, not only racially, but around the world as well.