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"Nashville, TN"

Amsterdam News: The Terrible Cost of the Ballot

Saturday, September 1, 1962
GEORGIA, Albany, GA

Dr. King excites public confidence towards the Civil Rights Movement by describing a devastating occurrence.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

MLK Confidential Memorandum

Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA), New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King outlines the SCLC's direct action program for the communities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Leon Margolis

Tuesday, December 3, 1963
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King addresses a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Margolis to thank them for their son Jonathan's donation of one week's allowance to the SCLC. He explains what this and other donations enable the SCLC to accomplish.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012
New York, NY

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Man: Sinner

Referencing Psalms 14:3, Dr. King discusses the completeness of sin in relationship to man.

Thirty-nine Articles

Dr. King writes notes regarding the "basic doctrinal formula of the Anglican Church."

Letter from Tyrone Little to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Tyrone Little expresses his sympathy to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King, and he explains that his school plans to hold a mass.

Letter to the Editor regarding Harris Wofford

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA

This letter to the editor comes to the defense of Harris Wofford, civil rights advisor to President Kennedy, who was inaccurately described in print.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964
California (CA)

Mrs. Aaron Edgar Oliver writes Dr. King to give thanks for his efforts to try and lead the Republican convention in its choice of a candidate.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Letter from Leonard Zion to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965
Massachusetts (MA)

Leonard Zion writes Dr. King stating that SCOPE (Summer Community Organization and Political Action) is organizing students and faculty at Brandeis University in Massachusetts to raise $40,000 to support him. The SCOPE project was run under the auspices of the Atlanta-based SCLC.

Formative Elements

From Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making," Dr. King records the formative elements of the temporal world.

Letter from Emerson College to MLK Regarding Speaking Invitation

Monday, November 20, 1967
Boston, MA

Emerson College extends Dr. King an invitation to speak at their communication lecture series. The lecture coordinator, Vic Silvestri, assures Dr. King that he will be awarded both an honorarium and travel expenses if he accepts.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), VIETNAM

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to F. D. Kirkpatrick

Monday, March 4, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Rev. Abernathy commends Rev. Kirkpatrick on his job with the Steering Committee and discusses the enclosure of receipts.

Sin

Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Telegram from James A. Dombrowski to Lindsay Almond Jr.

Richmond, VA

James A. Dombrowski urges J. Lindsay Almond to take a stand against segregation in the city of Lynchburg. This urgency emerged as a result of the jailing of six students who sitting-in at a local diner.

Letter from MLK to Richard Huett

Monday, February 25, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King informs Richard Huett, Editor of Laurel Editions and Delta Books, that he cannot write a book for Huett due to other writing responsibilities and time commitments.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Albert A. Goldman

Tuesday, July 13, 1965
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Dr. King informs Rabbi Albert A. Goldman that he will not be able to be a speaker at the Community Thanksgiving Services at The Isaac M. Wise Temple this year.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Charles Darwin's "The Origin of Species."

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Letter from Frances Witherspoon to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS)

Frances Witherspoon offers his or her thanks and praise to Dr. King's new book and efforts in promoting racial unity.

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

Letter from Wallace Best to MLK

Sunday, April 25, 1965
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Wallace Best encloses a donation to the SCLC but advises against purusing economic boycotts. According to Best, an economic boycott will "greatly demean the conduct of your noble cause....."

Telegram from MLK to L. Venchael Booth

Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Dr. Booth on receiving the Doctor of Divinity degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joan Daves references an enclosed check for royalties received for the Harper edition of "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." She also inquires about several charges on one of the book's statement and requests permission to check their validity.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965
New York (NY), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.