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"Nashville, TN"

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on the transcendence of God and His intimate relation to the world.

Letter from Mrs. Flossie Dedmond to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964

A representative of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority invites Dr. King to speak at the Public Meeting of the Forty-first National Convention held in Philadelphia, PA. For publicity purposes she requests several glossy photographs for distribution.

Letter from the Algemeen Handelsblad to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

C. A. Steketee, chief editor of Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad, asks Dr. King to write an article about the American Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Irving J. Block

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald requests Rabbi Irving J. Block contact Stanley Levison, Dr. King's attorney in New York City.

Youth in the World of Work

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James Pike

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Dr. James A. Pike that Dr. King will be able to preach for Grace Cathedral's Consecration celebration. She suggests that Dr. Pike lists five possible dates for Dr. King to fulfill this commitment in San Francisco.

Ebenezer Baptist Church

This picture depicts Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Dr. King pastored.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from Reverend Roland de Corneille to Wyatt Walker

Friday, December 6, 1963

Reverend Roland de Corneille writes to Wyatt T. Walker regarding a fundraiser for the SCLC. Reverend de Corneille would like for Dr. King and a notable celebrity, such as Harry Belafonte or Nat King Cole, to come to Toronto, Canada for a benefit show.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King sends Dr. Mays a check for $200 and informs him that he will not be able to attend the Founders' Day celebration.

Invitation Program to the 1966 Upper Room Citation

The following document is an invitation program from the Rev. Dr. Manning and the Upper Room inviting guests to attend the 1966 Upper Room Citation at the Grand Ballroom, London Hilton Hotel in London, England.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Letter from Claudie Erleigh to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

On behalf of the NUSAS Local Committee, Claudie Erleigh writes Dr. King requesting that he submit an article for the "NUSAS Journal." Dr. King's entry would extend further beyond the "general interest." The committee has also invited other influential leaders, such as Senator Robert F. Kennedy, to contribute to this journal.

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.

Materialism

Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Letter from Mr. Peter Feldman to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

In this letter Peter Feldman, the production manager for WRVR Radio in New York City, requests an interview with Dr. King the day of his sermon at Riverside Church. WRVR feels the interview would be a "significant platform" for his upcoming march on Washington. Dr. King would be assassinated less than a month later.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from C. M. Williams to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

In this letter, addressed to Reverend Ralph Abernathy, supporter C.M. Williams references Dr. King's funeral and requests a copy of his last speech. Many sympathizers and mourners wrote letters like this to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964

Carey B. Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority thanks Dr. King for his willingness to participate in the Forty-first Boule held in Philadelphia.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from Lou Goldstein to NAACP, February 6, 1968

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

In this letter, Lou Goldstein contacts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to inquire about the location of photographs of Dr. King, Roy Wilkins, and A. Philip Randolph.

Note Card Entitled Atheism

Atheism is cited from Sparrier in this note card.

Ferm, Vergilius (ed)

Dr. King cites a book written by Vergilius Ferm that discusses theology in America.

Donation Slip with Criticism of MLK

A former contributer to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference criticized Dr. King on top of this donation slip.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Letter from Lanette J. Campbell

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Lanette J. Campbell requests information regarding candidates in the Choice '68 presidential primary.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.