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Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

Thursday, December 30, 1965

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Alfred T. Davies to Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Alfred T. Davies writes Mrs. King thanking her for her performance before the General Assembly. Davies also sends well wishes and support to Dr. and Mrs. King in their endeavors.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

Thursday, January 3, 1963

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

Letter from MLK to Jacquelyn Dowd

Monday, July 15, 1963

Dr. King informs Jacquelyn Dowd that he will not be able to speak as invited in Memphis.

Letter from Debbie Winchester to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

10-year-old Debbie Winchester writes Dr. King requesting an autograph for her collection.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Letter from Minnie Summers Lindsey to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mrs. Lindsey asks Dr. King for a copy of a speech she recently heard on the radio and his "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1957

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to Editors of the New York Times

Monday, August 20, 1962

In this letter, Mays addresses the editors of the New York Times about an article on equal employment opportunity. Mays states that he was not consulted by the article's author. As a result, he was misquoted. Mays uses the remainder of the article to clarify his position on equal employment programs.

Letter from Pierre C. Armand to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Mr. Armand writes Dr. King concerning the goals of The Haitian Community Center in New York City. The Center attempts to institute programming in order to alleviate the various difficulties of the Haitian community. Mr. Armand also invites Dr. King to speak at a distinguished event as an honorary guest.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Johnson

Dr. King responds to Mr. Johnson's request for a recommendation by writing that he is honored by the request, but he does not believe that he can write a proper recommendation given the absence of their acquaintance. Dr. King makes suggestions for alternative recommendations and offers his "encouragement and support."

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

Letter from Nancy Davison to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Nancy Davison writes Dr. King to thank him for his words published in Ramparts. She writes that she finds it thrilling to be able read his own words instead of quotations used by others out of context. She thanks him for the stance he has taken on Vietnam, for fighting injustice, and for "having the courage to reveal what is in your heart."

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Sunday, May 6, 1962

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.

Letter from Jack Delano to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Jack Delano expresses how pleased the radio and television service of Puerto Rico is to learn that Dr. King has agreed to appear on their press interview program.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Telegram from MLK to Muhammad Ali

Dr. King sends a supportive telegram to Muhammad Ali. test

Acrostic Poem About MLK

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

United States Department of State Reprint of Vice President Nixon Speech

Thursday, December 6, 1956

This document contains the text of an address made by Vice President Nixon before the Automobile Manufacturers Association in New York.

Letter from MLK to James M. Kangongoi

Monday, April 16, 1962

Dr. King writes Mr. James M. Kangongoi acknowledging the receipt of his letter and expressing how good it was to meet him in Puerto Rico.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.