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Letter from Howard Sandum to MLK

Friday, September 7, 1962

Howard Sandum of the Macmillan Company writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for an address that Dr. King delivered.

Letter of Commitment to Reverend Jesse Jackson from John Wooten

Friday, February 10, 1967

John Wooton expresses the commitment of the Negro Industrial Economic Union towards the efforts of Reverend Jesse Jackson and SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, writes Dr. King regarding the Japanese edition of "Strength to Love." Kuhmoto requests a preface or message for the book and thanks Dr. King in advance for his kindness.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Syllabus in Preaching and Worship

This syllabus for the course "Preaching and Worship" details the topics to be covered during the course. The following key topics are included: The Preaching Ministry of the Church, The Preparation of the Sermon, and Worship.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Dr. Abernathy Selected for World Peace Mission

Friday, December 29, 1967

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces that Ralph D. Abernathy and his wife will embark on a world-wide mission for peace. Abernathy will serve as a delegate to the International Inter-religious Symposium on Peace.

Albany Movement Support Letter from MLK to Rev. Hugh Wire

Thursday, October 11, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Reverend Wire for his participation in the Albany Movement.

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Invitation from Southern Methodist University to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1965

Bert Moore invites Dr. King to be the guest lecturer at Southern Methodist University. He says that their organization has participated in demonstration and has raised awareness in their community. He also says that next year will be an important year for their school and for Dallas as a whole, and they need a man of Dr. King's stature to come.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Poems Entitled "Black Power," "Beyond Anger," and "Sins Of The Father"

In this document, there are three poems: "Black Power", "Beyond Anger" and "Sins Of The Father".

Letter from Stephen Weeg to MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965

The University of Notre Dame's Committee on Negro Enrollment seeks advice from Dr. King on where to obtain financial aid for African American Students.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Handwritten Thank You Letter From MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for contributions made to the SCLC, and informs the reader of the results of recent studies regarding illegitimate birth rates among negroes as opposed to whites.

Letter from Mrs. W. J. Givan to MLK about Unsavory Association

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Givan expresses her dissatisfaction with Dr. King on how "prominent Negroes" are often photographed with "unsavory whites."

Letter from MLK to Jo Ellen Braveman

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks Jo Ellen Braveman, an employee at the Julia Richman High School, and the Human Relations Club for presenting him with an award.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Different Meanings of Prehension

Dr. King outlines the different meanings of "prehension" in Alfred North Whitehead's books Science and the Modern World and Process and Reality.

Letter from John Thomas Porter to MLK

Thursday, June 28, 1962

Mr. Porter, pastor of First Baptist Institutional Church, writes to Dr. King concerning a previously discussed letter of recommendation. The letter will address a vacant pastoral position in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.