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Letter from Robert Finarelli to MLK

Wednesday, October 30, 1963

The staff of Edwin H. Vare Junior High School contributes to the SCLC "in remembrance of the Birmingham children who were victims of hate."

Letter from Harold E. Fey to MLK 12/31/59

Thursday, December 31, 1959

Dr. King was the recipient of this correspondence from Harold Fey, Editor of 'The Christian Century.' Mr. Fey acknowledged Dr. King's article "How My Mind Has Changed" and raised one concern of why Dr. King didn't mention his stabbing incident, in the article. He referenced Paul in the Bible by quoting Galatians 6:17, "I bear on my body the marks of Jesus." 'The Christian Century' published the article "How My Mind Has Changed."

The Lynching Tree

Jerry Peace writes the poem "The Lynching Tree" which illustrates the pain involved with lynching black people.

Schleiermacher (Original Sin)

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher’s views on original sin.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

SCLC National Executive Board Meeting

Thursday, March 30, 1967

The SCLC conducts a mass meeting with the national executive board in Kentucky. Both members from the SCLC and Kentucky Christian Leadership Conference direct the meeting. The schedule includes an invocation, greetings from various members, an address by Dr. King, and more.

Letter from Eunice Janousek to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963

Eunice Janousek requests that Dr. King review materials in the matter of the Blakey case with the hope that he can provide assistance to those who are being oppressed in South Dakota.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Susan Julien Offers Service to MLK

Susan Julien responds to a SCLC circulation letter sent by Dr. King. As a student with no income, Susan offers her service to help further the cause for "democratic change." She has dedicated Saturdays to contribute to the movement and asks if there is a SCLC branch near her home in New York.

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

The Tabernacle Baptist Church

The Tabernacle Baptist Church publishes this program for their Young Adult Sunday on March 20, 1960. Dr. King is listed to deliver the sermon at morning worship service.

Banner at "Poor People's March," Washington, D.C. June, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Mrs. Mildred Yacks to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Mildred Yacks writes Dr. King, complimenting him on his character but shares her belief that King's efforts are useless unless he redirects the youth.

Letter from Chester S. Williams to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Mr. Williams, a member of the executive committee of his local branch of the NAACP, expresses his displeasure at NAACP Executive Director Roy Wilkins attacking Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Stride Towards Freedom Royalties

Sunday, July 25, 1965

This document serves as a financial receipt from Laurence Pollinger Ltd. Royalties for Dr. King's book Stride Towards Freedom are included in the statement.

The Georgia State Senate

Friday, September 2, 1966

The Georgia State Senate informs fellow Democrats of an important meeting before the 1966 Primary Election. This meeting will focus on finalizing plans for their participation in this election.

Contract between MLK and Cheltenham Township Adult School

Saturday, December 21, 1963

This document is a contract between Dr. King and a Wyncote, PA school with the agreement of Dr. King delivering a talk for the compensation and expenses listed.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from L. H. Horace Perera to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

L. H. Horace Perera, Secretary General of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA), invites Dr. King to be the speaker of honor at the 20th Plenary Assembly of WFUNA.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Letter from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Friday, November 22, 1963

The executive director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. communicates to the recipient that despite the raids by the state and city police, the organization is attempting to continue operations. The police stripped the SCEF of numerous documentation and correspondence information. The director is certain they would be able to obtain success with the moral support in New Orleans and a possible contribution from the recipient. Of significance is the letter's date: the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Letter from Myron A. Hoyt to MLK about Financial and Moral Support

Thursday, August 11, 1966

In this letter Myron A. Hoyt, of the Synod of South Dakota, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC and comments on Dr. King's reaction to the Black Power Movement.

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes William James' view of metaphysics.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."