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Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Monday, May 1, 1967

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Wednesday, March 14, 1962

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, March 30, 1964

Frazer Earle from the Canadian Council of Christian and Jews Inc. invites Dr. King to their Annual Banquet.

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Randolph T. Blackwell

Friday, December 2, 1966

Harry Wachtel informs Randolph Blackwell that he's including $4,500 for the Southern Rural Action Project. The purpose of the project is to reduce the amount of poverty known to be prevalent in the south.

Letter from Delight S. Gordon to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Ms. Gordon urges Dr. King to use his influence as a great leader to persuade Negros not to condone the actions of Adam Clayton Powell.

Class Notes Psalms

Dr. King writes several scriptures from the Book of Psalms found in the Old Testament of the Bible.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Letter from Reverend James A. Pike to MLK

Friday, September 9, 1966

Reverend James A. Pike, a famous American Episcopal Bishop, writes to Dr. King regarding an appearance at the University of Cambridge's Great St. Mary's.

Letter from Debbie Rubiano to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

MLK's Speech Notes

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Sermon Outline Notes - MLK

This document is an outline handwritten by Dr. King, who frequently wrote such outlines as a precursor to a sermon. The topic centers on man's talent and his reasons for using--or more importantly, not using--that talent.

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.

Letter from Senator Clifford P. Case to MLK Regarding Poll Taxes as a Condition to Vote

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

New Jersey Senator Clifford Case informs Dr. King that he feels strongly about the elimination of poll taxes as a condition to vote, and he will do his best to push through a provision abolishing these taxes.

Invitation from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, February 25, 1963

In this letter Harper & Row publishers are requesting Dr. King's presence at a seminar for clergymen, theologians, and laymen. The seminar will discuss how the ministry is affected by cultural changes in society. It will be a weekend retreat and Harper & Row are willing to assume all travel expenses.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to "Dorothy"

This document is a draft of an addendum to a letter Dr. King had previously worked on and is addressed to "Dorothy." While most of this document centers on "support" and is based on form templates, Dr. King specifically mentions a "suggestion concerning 'Lil Abuer" [phonetic].

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

Thursday, August 25, 1966

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, June 26, 1966

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.