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MLK Index Card

Dr. King outlines Montesquier and his combination of historical and economical science.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.


Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

March on Washington Transportation Information

This is a form sent to each organization participating in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, requiring information regarding transportation arrangements.

Letter from Robert L. Brandfon to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966

Dr. Robert L. Brandfon, a history professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, requests Dr. King's permission to include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a book for college students entitled "Readings in the History of the South Since 1900."

Letter from Mrs. Florence W. Lee to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

National Secretary of the Ladies' Auxiliary, Knights of Peter Claver, Florence W. Lee, encloses a check for one hundred dollars to further SCLC's numerous endeavors.

Letter from W. F. Washington to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Washington assures Dr. King that he has his support as a fellow minister for his stand on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.


Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Letter from Eugene Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Eugene Patterson thanks Dr. King for the congratulatory letter in which Dr. King clarified his position on Vietnam. Patterson also asks Dr. King to suggest a time for them to meet to discuss the Civil Rights Movement and Vietnam.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King

This royalty statement for the period of January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964 is for the Dutch-language edition of "Strength to Love," published by Van Loghum Slaterus.

Letter from a Tenant to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King received many unsigned letters from tenants in sub-standard housing in urban areas. Chicago was one of the main cities because Dr. King actually lived and conducted SCLC business there for a time. A tenant from a Chicago apartment complex writes to Dr. King suggesting that he discreetly visit the building to learn first hand of the unacceptable living conditions.

William M. Kunstle writes to MLK About the Shuttlesworht-Phifer Case

Monday, December 16, 1963

William M. Kunstler sends Dr. King the decision marks from the Shutllesworth- Phifer case. The case resulted in a victory, but took five years to draw a decision.

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "The Bible"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

Letter from Rev. Celestine Fernado to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

The Editor of the Ceylon Churchman, Reverend Celestine Fernando, request a copy of Dr. King's letter from jail to publish in the magazine. Reverend Fernando is certain that this publication is a great message and will allow the church to re-evaluate its work.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule with Publisher

Monday, May 4, 1964

Joan Daves provides details for the Monday, June 8th schedule that Dr. King's publisher would like to set up. The day starts off with the Today Show and ends with a cocktail party.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Memo to Members of the National Board of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Friday, January 6, 1967

This letter from Richard W. Boone invites recipients to attend a workshop for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".