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"Nevada (NV)"

Burn Baby Burn: Problems of the Urban Ghetto

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This letter from the Georgia Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union announces a cocktail reception for Aryeh Neier at the Wit's End.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James P. Dixon of Antioch College

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Dora McDonald writes Dr. James Dixon to express Dr. King's joy in his ability to accept Dr. Dixon's invitation to speak at Antioch College's commencement.

Reservation Request Letter from Morehouse

Monday, February 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes Dr. King to inform him of the school's upcoming "Centennial activities." Hoping both he and Mrs. King will attend, he kindly urges Dr. King to RSVP immediately for the event on Friday evening. The writing on the letter indicates that Dr. Mays' request was answered via telephone.

MLK Notes - Voting Issues and Strategies

North Carolina (NC)

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's, found on the back of a memorandum, focus largely on voter registration issues and strategies. Of interest is an item adjacent to the body of the notes remarking, "Daddy King has yet to understand non-violence."

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
South Carolina (SC)

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

Iroquois Brewery-A Report from the President

In this document, Terry Fox, President of Iroquois Brewery, issued a report informing the public that their company implemented a "Learn-And-Earn Program. The program offered young people in Buffalo, New York temporary summer jobs, in an effort to train future adult workers. Unfortunately, there is no listed year, for the beginning of the program, highlighted in the document.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Jacob Broertjes

Wednesday, September 2, 1964
NETHERLANDS

Dorothy Gaines encloses a copy of all of Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young's expenses while in Amsterdam for the Baptist Federation Convention.

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966
PAKISTAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Ralph David Abernathy to the Executive Board of S.C.L.C

Tuesday, September 29, 1964
Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Ralph Abernathy provides the financial statement for the S.C.L.C.'s September 1, 1963 - August 31, 1964 fiscal year.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Boston, MA, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Griffin R. Simmons

Wednesday, September 5, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King informs Mr. Simmons, President of the Consolidate Association, that he will not be able to travel to New York to accept an award from the association due to the struggle in the South.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Nebraska (NE), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

Handwritten notecard regarding Realism

Index card written by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965
VIETNAM, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Indiana (IN)

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

INDIA, New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

Letter from FLING Unifie to MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
SENEGAL, GAMBIA, PORTUGAL

Mauricio Gregorio Okatha describes to Dr. King the harsh conditions and struggles of the people in Portuguese, Guinea in their fight for freedom. Mr. Okatha requests the SCLC’s assistance in sending medication and clothing for their soldiers, who are wounded and fighting in rags.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Saturday, May 6, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.

Letter from The Norwegian Student Association to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Norwegian student representatives reference a letter from Hakon Knutsen of the American Baptist Convention, inquiring about Dr. King's availability to address student groups during his stay in Norway.

Telegram from Wyatt Tee Walker

Saturday, July 28, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Walker sends out this telegram to inform its recipients that Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy have been unjustly arrested in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Virginia (VA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from David A. Gill

Tuesday, September 5, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Gill requests a photograph of Dr. King for classroom display.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

Connecticut (CT), New York (NY), Washington (WA)

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

Saturday, February 3, 1962
Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.