Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"New Delhi, India"

MLK's notecard regarding social gospel

Dr. King outlines his views on social gospel.

Reviews of Strength to Love

Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965
VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, CUBA, Florida (FL), Hawaii (HI), HUNGARY, GUATEMALA, IRAN, BRAZIL

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes James A. Froude's "Short Studies on Great Subjects."

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Miss Enid Baird

Florida (FL)

Dora McDonald sends word via telegram to Enid C. Baird informing her of an unforeseen emergency that prevents her attendance at the Urban League Convention.

The Answer to a Perplexing Question

ISRAEL

"Why Could Not We Cast Him Out?" is a chapter in Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." In this chapter, Dr. King discusses the methods in which man attempts to deal with evil in the world. Two methodologies are distinguished. The first concerns man's independent attempt to remove evil and the second stems from man's ideology of making God solely responsible for eliminating evil. Dr. King concludes that neither method is successful and that man has to find a medium between the two.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Wisconsin (WI), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Jackson, MS, MARTINIQUE, ALGERIA, VIETNAM, Missouri (MO)

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Letter from Myron A. Hoyt to MLK about Financial and Moral Support

Thursday, August 11, 1966
South Dakota (SD)

In this letter Myron A. Hoyt, of the Synod of South Dakota, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC and comments on Dr. King's reaction to the Black Power Movement.

Wieman's Empirician

Dr. King records a quote from religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman's book, "The Source of Human Good" on the impossibility of knowing final outcomes.

Letter from Tevan Ware to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967
Texas (TX)

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet of the Chicago Sun-Times extends an invitation to Dr. King for an appearance on his television show, after receiving word of the Reverend's presence in the city.

Protagoras

Dr. King writes about Protagoras’ view that appearance is reality.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

Test of Address by Vice President Richard M. Nixon

Friday, October 19, 1956
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, GERMANY, Virginia (VA), Pennsylvania (PA)

Vice President Nixon discusses the legacy of Alfred E. Smith and how it correlates with the American dream.

Letter from Norman R. Snook to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Norman Snook of the United Christian Center invites Dr. King to come preach at the Ohio State University United Chapel.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968
Texas (TX)

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter from Patterson Charles Jr. to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Georgia (GA)

Patterson Charles, Jr. writes Dora McDonald asking for Dr. King's help regarding alleged racial discrimination in a legal matter.

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from James Scheuer to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

In this letter to Dr. King, Congressman Scheuer asks Dr. King to testify at a hearing of the Select Subcommittee on Labor of the House Committee on Education and Labor about House Resolution 12962. This bill focused on creating a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

News from the SCEF

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Telegram from Konrad Bloch to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Konrad Bloch congratulates Dr. King and says he will see him in Stockholm.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Letter from Waltraud Feller to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Waltraud Feller writes Dr. King requesting his autograph and any other information that he can provide.

Autograph Request

GERMANY

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

Notes on Atlanta Housing Hearing

Friday, April 10, 1959
Washington, D.C., California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

This document contains the United States Commission on Civil Rights notes on an Atlanta Housing hearing. The Commission believes that Atlanta will present "new aspects of the problem." The Commission is also collecting information to determine whether equal opportunity in housing is denied due to discrimination. Also included are questions the Commission plans to ask regarding housing.

Letter from Julius H. Avery to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Julius H. Avery notifies Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta for a conference at the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Mr. Avery further requests that during his visit to the city, he and Dr. King arrange a meeting.

War

Dr. King records a quote regarding war from General Omar Bradley in 1950.

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Thursday, April 5, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.