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Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York (NY), ITALY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about her Italian associates, Santi Ando & Figli's, invitation to Italy. She also notes the publisher's request for a surplus of photographs.

Clement of Alexandria

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on Clement of Alexandria.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

Sunday, March 8, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Sensuality

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on pride as the basic sin and sensuality the result of pride.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963
North Carolina (NC), Birmingham, AL

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967
INDIA, London, England

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Howard Sandum to MLK

Friday, September 7, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Howard Sandum of the Macmillan Company writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for an address that Dr. King delivered.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA)

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Carbon Copy of Letter from Melvin Arnold to Joan Daves

Monday, September 16, 1963
New York, NY

In this letter, Melvin Arnold, a representative of Harper & Row Publishing, clarifies and corrects sales and advertising figures related to Dr. King's book, "Strength of Love". The letter refers to a telephone conversation between Arnold and Joan Daves, a literary representative of Dr. King, in which advertising and promotion figures were discussed. Arnold uses the letter to justify the disappointing 18% sales outlay decided on by Dr. King's publisher.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, March 26, 1946

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

Two Americas

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

This essay highlights the realities of poverty stricken aliens in an affluent society. Through its examination of Negro-white relations, urban riots, and the War on Poverty, the author insists that the nonviolent struggle for civil rights must continue.

Royalty Statement for Dr. King’s “Strength to Love”

Saturday, January 1, 1966
New York (NY)

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Finnish edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Kirjapaja.

MLK Statement on Church Groundbreaking

Monday, February 4, 1963
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on the burning of churches in Dawson, Georgia, stating that this act is a symbol of the "tragic depth to which men and women can sink when they are guided by prejudice and when they are filled with hatred."

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965
Minnesota (MN)

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Cambridge, MA

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967
Oregon (OR), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Philosophy

Dr. King describes philosophy as being the "wholes of which sciences describe the parts." He states that the answers to questions will differ depending on the school of philosophy one references.

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. Letter to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. is an organization dedicated to educating the youth through their distribution of scholarships. Wilson W. Woodbeck informs Dr. King that the organization will be honored to have him as an honorary member as they are entering into the third annual scholarship concert.

Letter Dated 12/7/62 from MLK's Secretary to Mel Arnold

Friday, December 7, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a enclosure of the sermon entitled "Broken Dreams."

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

Friday, May 31, 1957
Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Letter from L. Howard Bennett to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

L. Howard Bennett writes Dr. King and encloses statistical information regarding African American involvement in the Vietnam War.

White House Invitation to Signing of Voting Rights Act

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

This telegram from The White House invites Dr. King to the U.S. Capitol for the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.