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Crozer Theological Seminary Comprehensive Examinations

Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The following is a detailed overview of comprehensive examinations at the Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Exams are both written and oral. "The purpose of the oral examination is to discover the student's ability to think in an integrative manner over all the areas of the theological education."

Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, January 14, 1967
Denver, CO, Washington, D.C.

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

Washington, D.C.

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

I Sat Where They Sat Sermon Outline

This sermon draft of Dr. King's was never delivered, but focuses on the Christian themes of empathy and understanding. Dr. King claims that "if the white man was closer to the Negro he would... ...understand them" better.

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962
Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

And What of Marriage Master?

Marriage vows are handwritten on the backside of this printout of a poem written by Kahlil Gibran entitled, "And What of Marriage Master?".

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962
California (CA), Ohio (OH)

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph Institue to MLK Regarding "Right to Work"

Monday, May 22, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Bayard Rustin, the Executive Director of A. Philip Randolph Institute, expresses gratitude for Dr. King signing the introduction - "Right to Work" Laws --A Trap for America's Minorities".

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

New York (NY), New York, NY

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Letter from Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966
South Africa

A. Philip Randolph, the Chairman of the Committee of Conscience Against Apartheid, sent this letter to urge Chase Manhattan and First National City Banks users to withdraw their funds to signify their disapproval of their engagement in South Africa.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Illinois (IL), New York (NY)

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Letter from Louis C. Blount to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

Louis Blount of the Great Lakes Mutual Life Insurance Company in Michigan encloses a check to the SCLC.

Telegram from Emory R. Searcy to MLK and Others

Albany, GA

Dr. Searcy advises Dr. King and Dr. Abernathy to consider relinquishing their involvement with the Albany Movement. The sender suggests that this action may help to dispel contention resulting from "the presence of outsiders" and the process of negotiations.

Letter of Holy Land Trip Postponement from MLK to Sandy F. Ray

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
New York (NY), GREECE, ISRAEL

In this retained copy of his letter to Sandy Ray of Concreta Tours, Dr. King postpones his planned tour of the Holy Land. Dr. King suggests observing the escalating conflict there, along with the strife in Greece, before revisiting further plans for trips to those areas.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

The Sickness of our Society

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Telegram from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

Melvin Arnold asks Dr. King to approve either "The Strength to Love" or "The Cost of Love" as the title of Dr. King's book.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Iowa (IA)

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Letter to MLK from John Yeck

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Yeck asks Dr. King to think about the connotations of the words "black" and "Negro." He feels that the word "black" contains a separating connotation, and the word "Negro" a unifying one.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New Hampshire (NH), San Francisco, CA, Michigan (MI), Brooklyn, NY

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Mary Gaston

Tuesday, August 29, 1967
California (CA)

In this lette,r Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mary Gaston for her contribution to the SCLC. He also explains how such funds help the SCLC achieve their cause.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Agnes Mack to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963
Florida (FL)

Agnes Mack writes Dr. King to request a copy of his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. She also encourages him to continue in his efforts.

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

SWEDEN, Madrid, Spain

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

Letter from Senator Charles H. Percy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

United States Senator, Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that he would like him to read the enclosed speech, "Toward Responsible Freedom", given before the Community Renewal Society of Chicago. The senator also provides an update on the housing proposal and gives Dr.King a copy of the committee report.