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"New Delhi, India"

Telegram from A. J. Gervantes to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mayor Cervantes of St. Louis, invites Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is."

Letter from MLK to the Erie, Pennsylvania NAACP

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from Erie Branch of the NAACP.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

Faith and Reason

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Letter from MLK to Gordon R. Pollard

Thursday, January 6, 1966

Dr. King expresses his embarrassment in his late response to Mr. Pollard's letter regarding a speaking engagement at the University of Victoria. Dr. King shares his gratitude for the invitation but regretfully declines due to the fact that he has accepted his maximum number of engagements for the time period.

Letter from Mrs. Eva Claytor to MLK

Wednesday, December 14, 1966

In this letter Mrs. Claytor of New York, NY, identifies herself as an "admirer" and is writing to inform Dr. King that his proposed book title "Where Do We Go From Here [sic]" conflicts with a previously published and copyrighted work of the same title in England.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Mr. Brita Hakansson

Wednesday, August 8, 1962

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Mr. Brita Hakansson to contact Dora McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in September of 1962.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Get well letter from Nicholas Altomerianos to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Nicholas Altomerianos, Mayor of Charles Evan Hughes High School in New York, sent Dr. King this get well letter on behalf of its faculty and students.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Letter from S. Leiss to MLK

Saturday, March 6, 1965

The Joan Daves Agency sends Dr. King a check from Oxford University Press for royalties associated with the reprint of "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in Alpheus T. Mason's "Free Government in the Making."

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Letter from Dr. King to Dr. Arland F. Christ-Janer

Monday, November 19, 1962

Dr. King delivered a speech at Cornell College to discuss the problems of racial injustice within the nation. Dr. King expresses his deep gratitude for the hospitality he received during his visit.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Musical Composition by C. Bosserman

This untitled musical composition by C. Bosserman alludes to the White race, urging the White race to join the human race.

NCNP Role in the South, 1968, with Proposed Budget

Hosea Williams writes Mr. Pepper persuading him to have a program for the National Conference on New Politics in the South. He feels the programs would help many of the states in the South come together through a south-wide congress. Mr. Williams then includes the targeted states and cities as well as the financial aspects to make sure this program is a success.

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Bacon

Dr. King notes Alexander Pope's characterization of Francis Bacon.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Letter from Joan Daves to Harry H. Wachtel

Friday, November 6, 1964

Joan Daves sends Mr. Watchel a copy of a proposed Memorandum of Agreement for the distribution of hand lettered copies of Martin Luther King's speech I Have A Dream.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.