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"New Delhi, India"

United States Department of Agriculture

Thursday, February 1, 1968

This document references Secretary Orville L. Freeman's speech regarding administrative programs to improve food assistance and nutrition. One of the programs that is discussed is the School Breakfast Program, which will make free breakfast available to thousands of children. Other programs are also mentioned and described as the document proceeds.

Letter from Robert Markowitz to MLK

Tuesday, January 1, 1963

Robert Markowitz, general manager of the Hampton House, sends Dr. King a request for reservations during the week of a golf tournament. He also lists the occupancy rates for the rooms.

Letter from Benjamin Brown to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Benjamin Brown, literary editor for CORE, thanks Dr. King for his previous letter regarding the "CORE Guide" publication. Brown asks that CORE be granted permission to reprint copies of Dr. King's past speeches.

Dr. MLK and the American Dream

The article talks about Dr.King addressing the issue of racial imbalance in Boston public schools. Dr. King expresses his opinion that "racial segregation is politically unsound and relegates persons to the status of things, stigmatizing persons of color as untouchables in a caste system.

Constitution and By-Laws of the SCLC, Inc.

The SCLC exhibits its rules and regulations for the stability of the organization in this Constitution and by-laws. SCLC's constitution addresses several organizational related factors including board responsibilities, meetings, membership and chapter development.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Letter form Gloria Kenny to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

Gloria Kenny praises Dr. King and the SCLC for sending a small group of individuals to the Agape Mass at MaryMount College. She also commends him on his efforts to speak out against the Vietnam War.

Letter from the TATTLER Staff to MLK

Tuesday, November 10, 1964

The TATTLER staff at Atlanta's Drexel Catholic High School congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Power"

This index card written by Dr. King references quotations pertaining to the concept of "Power".

Negro Pioneers: Booker T. Washington

Lucille A. Chambers tells the story of Booker T. Washington's rise in society from his birth in Virginia to his founding of the Tuskegee Institute and the Negro Business League.

Letter from Representative Carl Perkins to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Carl Perkins informs Dr. King that he supports fighting against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from John Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967

Gettysburg College Chaplain, Mr. Vannorsdall, writes Ms. McDonald concerning the grounds of Dr. King's travel arrangements to speak at the college. He reassures Ms. McDonald of Dr. King's minimal travel time and further discloses his accommodations.

Letter from Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale to Joan Daves

Friday, March 17, 1967

Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale informs Joan Daves of an international meeting on the problems of New Africa in Palermo, Italy. It is noted that Santi Ando & Figli would like for Dr. King to lecture in Rome, Milan, Florence, Torino & Bolgna and provide photographs they may use in their promotion campaign for Dr. King's books.

Letter from MLK to W. D. Mason

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in support of the Mercer County Branch of the NAACP in Farrell, Pennsylvania. He expresses his appreciation for the invitation but explains that he has accepted his maximum number of speaking engagements for the spring.

Letter from Ruth Decker to MLK

Ruth Decker acknowledges her complete support to organizations such as the Southern Conference Education Fund and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. She encloses a generous gift to Dr. King to aid in his struggle for peace and compares his dilemma to Gandhi's situation.

List of Negro Inventors

This list of Negro American inventors includes various individuals such as Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, who performed the first successful open heart surgery, and W.A. Lavalette, who invented the printing press.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Book Sales

Friday, September 4, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves reports the sale figures for royalties and advances of the manuscript "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Gwen B. Geiges about Moral Support

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Mrs. Geiges to thank her for her letter expressing support of his work in the movement.

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Papandrew

Wednesday, October 10, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. John Papandrew of New Hampshire for giving witness during the Albany Movement. Dr. King explains that, through the events in Albany, the world is now aware of the situation in the South.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable J. Caleb Boggs

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator James Caleb Boggs of Delaware to commend his role in "forging the bi-partisan unity" that made possible the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.