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"New Delhi, India"

Letter from Gerald Feffer to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

Gerald Feffer of Lehigh University invites Dr. king to speak at the university in the near future.

Fear

Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Norman Seldes

Thursday, August 20, 1964

In this carbon copy of a letter to Mrs. Norman Seldes, Dr. King sends his appreciation for response to a letter of recent date.

Radio Sermon Titles and Dates

In this document Dr. King lists a series of radio sermon titles and their respective dates of delivery.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and expresses her love for him.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Sin

Dr. King provides insight on the "secret of sin."

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Jerusalem Post: Martin Luther King's Jewish Associations

Thursday, October 22, 1964

In this article, Dr. Israel Goldstein describes the friendship between Dr. King and the American Jewish Congress, including the degree of Jewish participation in Dr. King's 1963 March on Washington.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

The Role of the Church in the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma

This handwritten draft represents the first part of Dr. King's address entitled, "The Role of the Church in Facing the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma," delivered at the Conference on Christian Faith and Human Relations in 1957. Dr. King begins his address by discussing the scientific and technological advances that have taken place in America and how this progress has influenced economic growth. He asserts that this is the nation is dealing with a "chief moral dilemma."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Secular

Dr. King identifies the origin of the term secular as "meaning 'century,' that in time as distinguished from eternity." He explains that eternal things were more important that the things deemed to be belonging only to the present.

Church Program of the Installation of Rev. A. D. Williams King

Sunday, March 18, 1962

This program details the installation services of Reverend A. D. Williams King at The First Baptist Church of Ensley, Alabama. A number of community and church leaders, including his older brother, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Ralph Abernathy, welcome the young pastor and his family to his new pastorate position.

Note Regarding Boycotting Olympic Game

This is a brief handwritten note of appreciation for encouraging the boycott of the Olympic Games.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

The Desegregated Heart

Sunday, July 1, 1962

Dr. King praises Sarah-Patton Boyle for her creation of the book, "The Desegregated Heart." Dr. King recommends that everyone reads the book, for it expresses the power of Christian love operating in the human heart.

Recommendation Letter for Mrs. Lillie Hunter from MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Dr. King drafts a letter of recommendation for a former employee, Lillie Hunter.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Americans Need Some Discipline

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.