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Andrew Young Writes On Behalf of Michael Rosen

Monday, November 27, 1967
New York (NY), South Carolina (SC)

Andrew Young writes a letter of recommendation, on behalf of Michael Rosen, to the New York State Supreme Court.

Letter from Brown University Charles A. Baldwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967
Rhode Island (RI)

Charles Baldwin of Brown University asks Dr. King about his travel plans and materials needed for Dr. King's upcoming sermon at the university. He also invites Dr. King to a dinner and luncheon during his visit.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Friday, June 7, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

Letter from Reverend William D.F. Morris to MLK

Sunday, December 20, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. William D. F. Morris, of Centennial United Church in Toronto, invites Dr. King to visit his church during Lent.

Mississippi Project

Mississippi (MS)

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

Letter from Charlie Cheese Carsons to Rev. Andrew Young

Friday, July 22, 1966
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Jacksonville, FL, North Carolina (NC), Montgomery, AL

Charlie Cheese Carsons addresses Rev. Andrew Young to provide him with a painting that expresses the Civil Rights Movement and the fight for human dignity. Mr. Carsons is aware that Dr. King's attention has more important concerns which explains his reasoning for contacting Rev. Young. In addition to the painting, Mr. Carsons attaches his perceptions of prominent African Americans who served as his inspiration.

Letter from Mark Henderson to MLK

South Carolina (SC)

In this letter Mark Henderson comments on the incidents at the South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina known as the Orangeburg Massacre.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Letter from MLK to Office of Inspector of Foreign Dividends

Saturday, January 18, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King states that he is the beneficial owner of the Copyright Royalties paid by Laurence Pollinger, Ltd. and that he is still receiving income from them.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

PUERTO RICO

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Letter from Katarina Ungdomsrad to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King is invited to speak to the social democratic youth club "Katarina." The representatives of Katarina wish he would be able to speak "about peace in our time." The planned date of the event follows a day after Dr. King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

Letter from Paul Rene of KYAC to MLk

Thursday, May 26, 1966
Washington (WA)

Paul Rene, the Public Relations Director and News Editor of KYAC Radio requests to interview Dr. King on voter registration.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter from MLK to Hobson R. Reynolds

Tuesday, December 14, 1965
California (CA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King responds to an invitation from earlier in the year Hobson R. Reynolds. King states that because he is out of town frequently and receives a lot of incoming and outgoing mail sometimes letters are placed in the wrong place. King reference to a trip to Africa that he planned to visit, but was cancelled because of Watts riots in California. King thanks Mr. Reynolds for his contributions to the SCLC and says that he wishes to serve him in the future.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Lowndes County, AL, Philadelphia, MS

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

Foreword to Neil Sullivan's Book by MLK

Berkeley, CA, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King submits a rough draft of his foreword for a text written by Berkeley County Public Schools Superintendent Neil Sullivan.

Letter from Wilbur C. Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

Wilbur C. Davis writes Dr. King seeking prayer for him and his family. Davis also includes a poem that he wrote regarding Dr. King's life and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Sunday, February 11, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, VIETNAM

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter from MLK to Clara Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Clara Bell Graves thanking her for the encouraging letter. Dr. King states, "please be assured that we welcome with grateful heart such letters as the one you directed to me."

Letter from Robert Johnson Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1961
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Smith invites Dr. King to be a special guest at the Annual Men's Day at Salem Baptist Church. He also asks Dr. King to recommend Herbert C. Nelson for appointment as a federal judge.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Thursday, February 18, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

SCLC Board Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
Richmond, VA

This document is a proposed agenda for an SCLC board meeting, which includes Dr. King's notes of additional agenda items.

The Sword That Heals

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), INDIA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."