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Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

Letter from the US Civil Service Commission to Helyn M. Brooks

Friday, March 26, 1965

The United States Civil Service Commission informs Mrs. Helyn M. Brooks of her prospects for consideration for appointment in a civil service position.Mrs. Brooks' prospects section estimate is listed as poor.

Letter from Flournoy Coles to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Flournoy Coles invites Dr. King to come to Fisk University and lead a session of the Honors Program.


Dr. King describes Edgar S. Brightman’s four attitudes of worship in “Philosophy of Religion.”

Letter from MLK to First Prebysterian Church Regarding Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King personally thanks Jordan and First Presbyterian Church for their contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states, "I know that you cannot enjoy the experience of change as we who see it first hand everyday, but I trust that these fews words will convey our appreciation and gratitude."

Letter from MLK to Peter A. Mullin

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes Mr. Mullin to express his deep appreciation for being selected to receive the Gold Key Award at Boston College.

Letter to MLK from Wyatt Tee Walker of New York's Canaan Baptist Church

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Wyatt Walker comments on the positive relations between Jews and African Americans and asks Dr. King to support the new nation of Israel.

Discerning the Signs of History

Dr. King's sermon "Discerning the Signs of History" asserts "evil carries the seeds of its own destruction." King gives examples throughout history, such as slavery, colonialism, and the rise and fall of King Louis XVI.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Friday, September 23, 1966

Miss Dora McDonald writes Dr. Fiers regarding Dr. King's visit to Dallas, Texas.

Letter from Inam Rahman to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964

Inam Rahman, member of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, sends Dr. King a copy of the letter from the President of the Council inviting him to present a speech at the Azad Memorial Lectures.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

The Future of Integration

Wednesday, November 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

The Christian Year

Dr. King records a quote from William D. Maxwell's "An Outline of Christian Worship Its Developments and Forms." The quote describes how the Christian year came to be formed.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Nelson Rockefeller Telegram to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this telegram, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller's secretary cancels his upcoming appointment with Dr. King.

Letter from Harry Wunsch to MLK

Harry Wunsch encloses a contribution to support Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.


Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's "Pensees."

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

Letter from Jennings Randolph to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Jennings Randolph writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his previous telegram regarding support of the Voting Rights bill which would abolish poll taxes.

SCLC Newsletter: January-February 1966

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This early 1966 SCLC Newsletter reports the organization's recent activity. Main columns focus on Hosea Williams' voter registration work in Birmingham, Alabama and efforts towards slum eradication in Chicago and Atlanta. The document also includes photographic content of Dr. King's public speaking endeavors and evidence of the slum crisis. Consistent school inequities and segregation are the last topics discussed.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Transcript of MLK Appearance on WINS Radio

Sunday, May 31, 1964

This document is a 1964 transcript of a WINS Radio interview with Dr. King. The focus is the Civil Rights Bill.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Ball

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the Inaugural Ball following the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.