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"New Hampshire (NH)"

Letter from MLK to Leonard Smalls

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at The Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church due to preaching responsibilities at his own church. He also thanks Rev. Smalls for the offer to fundraise for the SCLC.

Letter from Prue Robertson to Ethel Minor

Friday, June 9, 1967

Prue Robertson, secretary to Mrs. King, writes Ethel Minor concerning students in Belgium that would like to correspond with S.N.C.C.

Check Distribution for the Crusade for Citizenship Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Mildred Smith is given a check on behalf of the Crusade for Citizenship program.

MLK Statement to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement to Time Magazine, Dr. King responds to President John F. Kennedy's call for new civil rights legislation.

The Student Movement and You

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Letter from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Monday, November 23, 1964

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, encourages Dr. King to accept an invitation to address sessions of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention sent earlier by Dr. Paul L. Sturges.

Letter to MLK from Stanley Rice

Thursday, September 21, 1967

In this letter, Vice President Stanley Rice writes to Dr. King thanking him for subscribing to the United Business Service.

Letter from MLK to Catriona Cole White

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Catriona Cole White to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. He explains that their recent projects have included voter registration in the south.

MLK on the Republican Nomination of Barry Goldwater

Thursday, July 16, 1964

Dr. King issued this statement regarding the "unfortunate and disastrous" Republican Party's nomination of Senator Barry Goldwater for the Presidency of the United States. The Reverend expounds on his disapproval of the nomination by stating that he represents an unrealistic conservation that is totally out of touch with the realities of the twentieth century.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Letter from J. M. Douglas to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963

J. M. Douglas, from the Moderators Council of the Progressive National Baptist Convention, thanks Dr. King for his consideration and prompt response to an earlier invitation. Douglas extends another invitation for Dr. King "to come to us, at your first opening available."

Telegram from N. K. Steele to MLK

N. K. Steele, on behalf of Bethel Baptist Church, offers prayers to Dr. King during his stay in the Care County Jail in Americus, Georgia.

Book Cover Notes

These remarks about Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" were prepared for the cover of his book and offer a very helpful overview of the early days of Dr. King's work.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Around The World Pilgrimage Proposal

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Mr. W Emerson Smith appoints Dr. King and Mr. Abernathy as leaders of a proposed pilgrimage around the world. Mr. Smith outlines the estimated costs and planned itinerary along with profits for the SCLC.

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

MLK Statement Regarding the Land Purchase Agreement with the Atlanta Housing Authority

Monday, July 31, 1967

With a purchase of land through the Atlanta Housing Authority, Dr. King announces that Ebenezer Baptist Church intends to provide new housing in an organized neighborhood near downtown Atlanta. Ebenezer Baptist Church also plans to develop a program with contracting firms to teach men the fundamentals of construction.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Annual Report by MLK

Friday, October 2, 1964

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

MLK's Sermon Outline

Dr. King categorizes different types of Christians.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Letter from Saskatchewan Centennial Corporation to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

Pat Ettinger asks Dr. King to send a personal gift for an auction to raise money for Canada's centennial celebration.

Letter from Adele Fishman to MLK

Monday, August 31, 1964

The American Book Company is requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail." They hope to include the letter, in a text book, entitled THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THIRD Edition. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Telegram from Eddie S. Carter to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Carter expresses his appreciation to Dr. King and the SCLC. He also informs Dr. King that he has recently made a contribution the organization and shall continuously do so.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech given during the March on Washington. Additionally Gertler requests speeches by Baynard Rustin and A. Philip Randolph. Gertler also mentions that he was present when Dr. King spoke in Montreal last year.

Operation Breadbasket Cost Breakdown

Operation Breadbasket was a division of the SCLC founded in 1962 and operated by Reverend Fred C. Bennett. The project was dedicated to improving the economic conditions of black communities across the United States. This is an estimated cost breakdown for the operation. It includes expected wages, salaries, transportation, insurance, and office supplies for running the project for one year.

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.