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Pride of Achievement

Dr. King quotes II Chronicles 26:15 regarding King Uzziah and cites Ralph Sockman’s “The Higher Happiness.”

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from Peter P. Bland to MLK

Sunday, April 3, 1966

Peter Bland seeks Dr. King's autograph to add to his collection.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Royalties Summary to MLK from J. Campe

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

Here J. Campe itemizes the income from Dr. King's various publications including "Why We Can't Wait," "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love", for a total of $2202.26.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes about God's love, quoting and reflecting on Proverbs 3: 11-12.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

Thursday, January 3, 1963

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.

Man (John Scotus Eriugena)

Dr. King outlines Erigena's theory of how the current state of complexity in the universe came about.

Telegram from Harry G. Boyte to Rev. John Papandrew

Harry Boyte expresses his happiness that Rev. John Papandrew will be working with the SCLC.

Letter from John Moody

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

SCLC Brochure: This is SCLC

SCLC outlines its history, achievements, initiatives and leadership in this brochure.

Letter from Mrs. Cyrus Eaton to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Eaton wrote this letter praising Dr. King for his remarks on Face the Nation. Mrs. Eaton states that Dr. King is indebted to him for always voicing his wisdom.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Letter from Theo Roling to MLK

Tuesday, August 29, 1967

Theo Roling writes Dr. King requesting an autographed photograph for his collection.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Letter to MLK from Carl Fuqua

Friday, February 1, 1963

Rev. Carl Fuqua writes a letter to Dr. King expressing regret that he could not attend the NAACP meeting due to a sudden virus.