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Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Mission to Mississippi

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter from MLK to G. Lawrence Jones

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes G. Lawrence Jones distressed that Jones doesn't have the funds to pursue higher education. King states, "Our troubled world needs very much for young men with the courage and foresight you display to receive every chance to develop your full potential."

Letter from Griffin R. Simmons to MLK

Thursday, October 4, 1962

Griffin R. Simmons, President of The Consolidate Association, responds to Dr. King's letter of recent date stating that he was chosen to be honored by the Consolidate Association. Simmons hopes that Dr. King can make an appearance at the Fall Affair, and requests him to make a statement which will appear in their journal.

Telegram from Dick Rettig to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Dick Rettig, President of the United States National Student Association, writes Dr. King to express the organization's solidarity with the sit-in movment.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Archibald

Dr. King informs Mrs. Archibald of the importance of continuously fighting for peace, not only domestically, but in foreign affairs as well.

Problem of Evil

Dr. King writes about the problem of evil according to the 10th chapter of Proverbs.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Letter from Melvin D. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Melvin D. Kennedy, Editor at Morehouse College, writes Dr. King about the book, "Perspectives in Freedom and Progress, 1863-1963: An appraisal of the Negro's First Hundred Years of Freedom." He explains that the book is a non-profit venture that will add to the Negro narrative and highlight Negro accomplishments. He goes on to request that Dr. King contribute a chapter about the Negro's fight for freedom.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 15, 1964

This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.

Letter from Kenneth M. Stewart to MLK

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Mr. Stewart informs Dr. King that the local paper on Long Island recently ran an ad by the John Birch Society which featured a photograph of Dr. King at the Highlander Folk School. The photograph was used to associate Dr. King with communists. Stewart requests information about the photograph from Dr. King so that he can write a letter to the editor of the paper to protest the insinuation of "guilt by association."

Letter from Rev. Michael Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Rev. Michael Hamilton informs Dr. King that the book "The Viet Nam War - Christian Perspectives", which includes Dr. King's address on Vietnam, has just been published. Hamilton also notifies Dr. King of publicity plans and expresses gratitude for his contribution.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Letter from Erik Ruden to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968

Upon learning of Dr. King's speaking engagement at the upcoming World Council meeting in Uppsala, Sweden, Ruden invites him to an additional meeting at luncheon or area Baptist Church.

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Letter from the United Nations to SCLC

Friday, January 26, 1968

The United Nations Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, requests information regarding activities planned and undertaken by the SCLC against apartheid.

Richard Millard Congratulates MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Richard Millard, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Boston University, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from Edouard Theis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Mr. Theis makes reference of having spoke to a French group of non-violent Christians about Dr. King's struggle for freedom. Mr. Theis suggests a reproduction of "Letter From The Birmingham Jail" as well as the distribution of the French translation as a chapter in a French Nonviolent Action book.

Memo from the East Garfield Park Organizing Staff to James Bevel, Bill Briggs, Bernard LaFayette, and Jim Poling

Friday, September 2, 1966

In this memorandum, the organizing staff of East Garfield Park outlines their plans of action to end slums. Their agenda is designed to operate the organization effectively.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.