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Postcard from Clara Ward to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966

Ms. Ward addresses this postcard to Dr. King per her visit to Vietnam.

The Student Movement and You

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Reason and Faith

Dr. King writes a quote from William Spurrier's Guide to the Christian Faith.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Memorandum from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

This memo addresses fundraising events that Mr. Duckett wishes to pursue.

Recommendation from Laplois Ashford

Friday, March 17, 1967

The Executive Director of the Urban League of Rochester writes this letter of recommendation to the President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers on behalf of Bernice Turner.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

This pamphlet provides information regarding the history, purpose and plans for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace.

Letter from Yolanda Riverra to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Yolanda Riverra, a student, writes to Mrs. King expressing sympathy for Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

Monday, December 25, 1967

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Ordained by God

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King for his proposed hypocrisy. The author contends that violence and law breaking are ungodly behaviors and therefore should not be associated with the peace movement that Dr. King endorses.

Letter from Wilford Tallie to Dr. King

Friday, January 28, 1966

Wilford Tallie, a Veteran at the West Side Veteran's Hospital, expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

CORE Treasure's Report for 1961 Fiscal Year

The Treasurer's Report from CORE includes the balance sheet for the fiscal year of 1961. The financial report covers an array of assets, liabilities, contributions, expenditures, and more.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dr. King to Miss Norwell

In this doucment, Dr.King apologizes for his delayed response and expresses gratitude for the song Miss Norwell sent him.

Letter from John Lawton to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

John Lawton, the Chairman of the Speech Department at Boston College, informs Dr. King about his program of student speakers who discuss various controversial issues with different organizations in New England. The objective of his program is to inform the community of civil rights issues involving education and employment. Furthermore, Mr. Lawson requests a conference with Dr. King to review the program concept.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.