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"New Hampshire (NH)"

Letter from Minerva Moreno to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Minerva Moreno, a New York City student, offers her sympathy to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter of Condolence from Martin and Coretta Scott King to Mrs. Lee Gaber

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Mr. & Mrs. King express sincere condolences to Mrs. Lee Gaber and family during her time of grief.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Knowledge)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967
Oregon (OR)

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966
Chicago, IL, California (CA), Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Los Angeles, CA

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Letter from L. John Collins to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
London, England, Atlanta, GA, NORWAY

John Collins writes to Dr. King to inform him of the record release of Nelson Mandela's speech with its enclosure. Collins continues with reference to the Reverend's visit in Norway, adding a request to mention Mandela's record during this time. In closing, the author reminds Dr. King of a discussion earlier in the year in reference to a trip to Europe, then alternatively requests his itinerary.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

South Carolina (SC), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, St. Augustine, FL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Why We Cant Wait Sticker

This document is a New American Library window sticker advertising Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination. Memphis, 1968

Memphis, TN

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Letter from Charles J. Benner to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966
Illinois (IL), Detroit, MI, Selma, AL, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King is adversely described in this letter and accused of being a communist by Charles Benner. He further slanders the Negro race and objects to the current national movements lead by Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. Uvee Mdodana-Arbouin to MLK

Friday, August 2, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

Mrs. Mdondana-Arbouin, President of the Women's Auxiliary of the Progressive Baptist National Convention, sends Dr. King the lyrics to the poem she delivered at their organization's recent dinner.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

New York (NY)

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

Memorandum Regarding California Fund Raising Meeting for SCLC

Monday, March 7, 1960
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King addresses Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy informing him of the transportation cost and hotel expenses for his trip to California.

Challenge on Luther King

Thursday, November 18, 1965

The author of this article says that Rev. I. L. de Villiers' letter lacked moderation, reasoned argument and tolerance of a different point of view. He also says that anyone who advocates for racial equality is branded as communist and that Afrikaners are suffering as a result.

Stanley Levison Suggests Use of Radio

Thursday, September 8, 1966
New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Stanley D. Levison, New York businessman and close friend to Dr. King, suggests to increase the use of radio as a means to reach masses of American citizens in the fight for civil rights.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

MLK Notes - Voting Issues and Strategies

North Carolina (NC)

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's, found on the back of a memorandum, focus largely on voter registration issues and strategies. Of interest is an item adjacent to the body of the notes remarking, "Daddy King has yet to understand non-violence."

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details an amended budget for the SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Mary L. Rhett to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

Mary Rhett writes Dr. King informing him that she has a very important matter to discuss with him regarding the civil rights struggle.



Dr. King writes about man, as discussed in the Old Testament passages, Hosea 10: 13 and 14.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962
Albany, GA

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Saturday, November 12, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald encloses biographical sketches to accompany Dr. King's lecture, "The Future of Integration."