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The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.

Letter from MLK to Walter Everett

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Walter Everett regarding the libel cases of Rev. Abernathy, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Lowery and Rev. Seay. He thanks Mr. Everett for his support and informs him that they are "winning the victory" with his help.

Letter from Margarita Rubio to MLK Regarding Employment

Tuesday, February 9, 1965
CUBA, Selma, AL, Florida (FL)

Margarita Rubio is in request of employment and seeks Dr. King for assistance. As a result of the leadership of Fidel Castro, Mrs. Rubio has relocated to the United States due to the political turmoil in Cuba. She has a bachelors degree in pedagogy but desires to teach Spanish at a college or university. Furthermore, Mrs. Rubio encloses a picture to accompany her letter to Dr. King.

Letter from William Gurland to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Brooklyn, NY

William Gurland, chairman of the speakers committee at Adelphi University, invites Dr. King to address the student body at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York. Gurland understands that Dr. King is busy with other responsibilities, but hopes that Dr. King will consider his invitation.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Washington, D.C.

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ), CHINA

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Annalee Stewart, Legislative and Branch Liaison for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak at the organization's fiftieth anniversary banquet. She provides a historic backdrop for the organization and explains its current focus on "Peace, Freedom and Bread."

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Boston, MA

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Pittsburgh, PA, San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Letter from Ann Bettiglan to MLK

Monday, August 16, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Ann Bettiglan writes Dr. King informing him that her friend Daniza Thompson is in need of financial help. She gives Dr. King her friend's address and phone number so that he can assist her.

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Wednesday, May 11, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald writes Ernest Shaefer on behalf of Dr. King to inform him that Dr. King will write him regarding his invitation in the future. She also asks Mr. Shaefer to inform them of the exact date of the meeting and travel expenses for Dr. King and his associate.

Note to MLK from Mrs. Ed Brooke

This note from Mrs. Ed Brooke is extremely negative towards Dr. King, accusing him of inciting riots and calling him names.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from Katherine H. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, March 27, 1965
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Katherine H. Jackson writes Dr. King on behalf of the late Reverend James J. Reeb. The Marin County Board of Supervisors declared March 20, James J. Reeb Memorial Day. Contributions were received throughout the county and forwarded to the SCLC. In addition, Jackson invites Dr. King to Marin County at a later, more convenient date.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Unitarianism

Dr. King describes the theology of Unitarianism as being a contrast to Trinitarianism.

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Tuesday, May 18, 1965
SWITZERLAND, New York (NY)

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter from James Godfrey to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Mr. Godfrey invites Dr. King to speak at the Radio Music Hall in Washington D.C. for a fundraising event on behalf of the NAACP.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates

Missouri (MO)

Dr. King composes a draft for a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates. He expresses his appreciation for their contribution and encouraging words. He discusses the SCLC's support of other organizations that are consistent with Judeo-Christian values and conveys their dedication to equality.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Geneva, Switzerland, BURMA / MYANMAR, ITALY, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., CANADA, SOUTH KOREA

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Albany, GA, CUBA

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Civilian Review Board in New York City

Friday, July 31, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

The author asserts that the New York community should initiate a new program by the Unity Council to include the appointment of an independent Civilian Review Board. This tactic is thought to bring peace and tranquility to the community.