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God

Dr. King cites a scripture that derives from the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy, stating "the seeing of God's face meant death."

Letter from Burt Nelson and Hilda Nelson to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Burt and Hilda Nelson write Dr. King requesting five copies of his address of April 5, 1967.

We Would See Jesus

Dr. King summarizes a biblical passage from the Book of John, in which he describes "inquiring Greeks" from a rich heritage who came to Philip and made the simple request, "sir, we would see Jesus." These words are also the title of one of Dr. King's sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

Friday, September 9, 1966

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Letter from Sylvia Walters to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Sylvia Walter writes Dr. King commending him on his strong statements and expresses that he has given many the strength to continue in fight for civil rights and peace.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Note from Joan Daves to Dr. King

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with British publishers, Hodder & Stroughton in London for his book "Strength To Love."

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Letter from Geraldine Fothergill to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Geraldine Fothergill, a mother of seven of Hartford, Connecticut, offers Dr. King an idea about educating African American youths. She suggests that African American families develop a boarding program to house African American students that are accepted at traditionally white colleges distant from home. She also suggests that Dr. King, as a minister, can convince other ministers to support this program through the churches.

Letter from French Organization Regarding American Outreach

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter, dated January 23,1968, was sent among French colleagues who are in support of promoting understanding and cooperation between Protestant and Catholic educationists in America and France.

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

Note on MLK Recorded Statement

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Virgina Kassel sends a transcript of a recorded statement by Dr. King. Ms. Kassel provides Dora McDonald of the details related to statement and apologies for any errors on the transcript document.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

The Mainichi Newspaper to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Aoki Shigeru, General Manager of The Mainichi Newspaper's Washington Bureau, requests an interview with Dr. King regarding the ending of the Vietnam War.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

Thursday, February 6, 1964

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Photograph of Hammond Sound Truck Advertising Freedom Concert

This photograph shows the Hammond Sound Truck advertising a Freedom Concert , which will feature Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, Joan Baez and Dr. King.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March

Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

B.F. Randolph

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.

Letter of Support from Mr. Watts to MLK

This letter from W. Douglass Watts, a student, extends his support and best wishes to Dr. King for his upcoming birthday.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Itinerary for MLK

In this correspondence, a list of "appearances" for Dr. King is listed.

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves

Friday, November 1, 1963

Joan Daves writes Dr. King concerning materials that she received from Harper & Row Publishers.