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Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

Epicureanism

Dr. King documents a passage from William De Witt Hyde's "Five Great Philosophers of Life" on Epicureanism. The passage outlines Epicurus' view on pleasure and the impersonal nature of the world.

Suggestions for SCLC Mobilization of Jobs and Income

Friday, February 9, 1968

This document outlines suggestions given by The North City Congress, a federation of independent groups concerned with North Central Philadelphia. The Congress seeks to enable the community to exercise a strong voice in government and social welfare operations pertaining to the improvement of surrounding ghettos. Included is a summary of recommendations and detailed points of consideration.

Thank-U-Gram from June E. Price to MLK

June E. Price sends Dr. King a "Thank-U-Gram" to congratulate him on the inspiring message he recently delivered and his dynamic leadership in the fight for first-class citizenship.

Letter from Arthur Jordan to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Arthur Jordan, General Secretary of St. Thomas Young Men's Christian Association in St. Thomas, Ontario, invites Dr. King to speak at a lecture engagement in Canada.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Wednesday, January 23, 1957

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the expenses for the Spanish pocket book edition of "Why We Can't Wait" and encloses a royalty check.

Letter from Douglas B. Leeds to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Douglas Leeds, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at Babson Institute of Business Administration, writes Dr. King to request any information regarding his political views. He also invites Dr. King to speak at the Institute in the future.

Americans Need Some Discipline

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Telegram from MLK to President Eisenhower

Thursday, August 13, 1959

This is the text of a telegram Dr. King sent to President Eisenhower regarding the contemporaneous events of the opening of desegregated schools and the arrival of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Mr. Brita Hakansson

Wednesday, August 8, 1962

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Mr. Brita Hakansson to contact Dora McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in September of 1962.

Letter from Welton B. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, March 23, 1966

The 376 and 400 National Veterans Association request Dr. King as a speaker for their Sixth National Reunion Convention in an effort to become an active organization in the struggle for equal rights. The convention chairman, Welton M. Smith, informs Dr. King that a $300 donation would be distributed upon the acceptance of this speaking engagement.

Letter from Eugenia C. Gambaccini to Russian Delegate

Eugenia Gambaccini impresses his hope that Russia "will realize the justice and love that God as for man, especially for those who have a good will."

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Anonymous Support for MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1960

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.

Letter from the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. Milnor Alexander congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to for him to speak at the Legislative Seminar during the 50th anniversary celebration of WILPF.

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

Thursday, May 26, 1966

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Man

Dr. King quotes a line from Homer's epic poem "The Iliad."

Machiavelli

Dr. King disagrees with Machiavelli's notion that political morality should be separated from social morality. Dr. King uses a quote from Heinrich von Treitschke to further analyze the issue.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Cohen

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King offers his appreciation to Leslie Cohen for communicating to him an "honor bestowed... ...by each of Miss Egnal's eighth grade class."