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Telegram to Dr. King Regarding Commissioner of Commerce

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King is informed that his telegram to Katherine C. Peden, Commisioner of Commerce State Office is undelivered.

Letter from Diane McFadden to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Diana McFadden requests information from Dr. King regarding his most significant personal characteristic.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Samuel Evans

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dora McDonald writes to Samuel L. Evans, of Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee, on behalf of Rev. Andrew Young regarding Dr. King's appearance in Philadelphia.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Unity

Dr. King documents insight regarding unity, reason, and God.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

SCLC Northern City Tour

SCLC provides an organizational manual that outlines details regarding their Northern city tour. They are traveling to cities in the northern United States in order to assess social conditions and build relationships amongst civil rights leadership. The manual also provides tour dates and suggestions for organizing the tour.

Letter from Ernesto R. Rodriguez, Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

Ernesto Rodriguez invites Dr. King to address the College Editors Guild Alumni Association at their 35th Anniversary Celebration.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

Dialogue: A Search for Reconciliation

Through the power of dialogue, the SCLC seeks to bring diverse cultures together for the purpose of removing barriers and achieving meaningful communication. This brochure outlines six programs of action designed to achieve this goal including group conversation, community dialogue, dialogue of faith, campus dialogue, dialogue round tables, and dialogue with self.

Letter from MLK to George E. Bass

Thursday, April 7, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Luncheon for the Planned Parenthood Association.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Letter from Nina Brown to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

Nina C. Brown writes Dr. King expressing appreciation on behalf of Pennsylvania State University for his visit to the institution. Additionally, she wishes Dr. King much success in his continued efforts to achieve civil rights.

Telegram from Edythe Siceluff to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Edythe Siceluff recalls her conversation with Dr. King in 1957 where they predicted he would become a prosperous world leader.

Letter from MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Thursday, February 22, 1968

This is a copy of the response letter dated February 9, 1968. It is addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Letter from Barbara W. Moffett to William Rutherford

Monday, January 8, 1968

Barbara Moffett discusses the possibility of coordinating efforts and collaborative participation between the American Friends Service Committee and SCLC.

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

The Boston Sunday Globe: The Road to Loyalty

Sunday, August 28, 1966

Justice Felix Frankfurter is quoted by the Boston Sunday Globe to discuss the lack of liberty in history due to repulsive individuals. The American Civil Liberties Union is accused of being communist as well as Jefferey Gordon, a member of the pro-Peking Progressive Labor Party. The article expounds on various organizations and quotes surrounding their political perspective.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Thompson Memorial Chapel Program Featuring MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This program highlights Dr. King as guest preacher for Thompson Memorial Chapel's Sunday service.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.