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Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from MLK to Marcia Burke

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King appreciates the invitation extended to him to speak for the Ohio Wesleyan University Student Committee on Race Relations, but must decline it.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ)

Harry Walker writes Dora McDonald regarding contracts for Dr. King's future speaking engagements.

MLK Speech at NAACP Sponsored Rally for Civil Rights

Sunday, July 10, 1960
Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King gives a speech in which he addresses a myriad of issues on the subject of civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM, PUERTO RICO

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Philosophy of History

Dr. King quotes a statement regarding history from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness."

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.

Letter from the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968
Milwaukee, WI

The executive board of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket informs Dr. King of the works and efforts of their organization. The SCLC's Operation Breadbasket originated the very principles and methods in which the Milwaukee chapter operates. The chapter has initiated many employment opportunities and increased the economic status of the Negro community. Dr. King is requested to provide them with the official documentation to charter their chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Furthermore, they would greatly appreciate the opportunity to see Dr. King in an appearance in Milwaukee.

Letter from MLK to Juanita Epps

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Juanita Epps and the members of the People's Community Church of Queens for their generous donation to SCLC. As Dr. King replies, "Your encouragement is an inspiration to me and all who are committed to the struggle for human rights and dignity."

Letter from Frederick G. Dutton to MLK Regarding the Oral History Project

Thursday, February 27, 1964
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Frederick G. Dutton, by request of Robert Kennedy, contacts Dr. King to discuss the Oral History Project for the John F. Kennedy Library. Mr. Dutton informs Dr. King that Berl Bernhard will be communicating with him to arrange a proper interview time.

Letter from Peter Sevetnyk to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966
Montgomery, AL, CANADA

Peter Servetynk, a former Roman Catholic Priest from Canada, invites Dr. King to speak at a massive gathering in Toronto. He further thanks Dr. King for his charitable works and wishes there were more people of his stature.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter writes Dr. King concerning the state in which Negroes live. The author feels as if Dr. King only addresses the faults of the white race instead of those of his own race.

Memo to Members of the National Board of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Friday, January 6, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Richard W. Boone invites recipients to attend a workshop for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes F. H. Bradley’s “Appearance and Reality.”

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Friday, May 15, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that Ballantine Books has the pocket rights to "Stride Toward Freedom" but they did not do much with the title. Harper & Brothers then got the rights back.The letter closes by saying that Harper & Brothers would like Dr. King's approval so the deal can be cleared.

Who They are and Why They Struck

South Carolina (SC)

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Pinn Memorial Baptist Church

Sunday, September 11, 1960
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This program outlines the Sunday morning worship service for Pinn Memorial Baptist Church. Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker to deliver a sermon on September 11, 1960.

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Letter from Michael J. Gerstley to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
Illinois (IL), Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Michael J. Gerstley desires to continue to legacy of his grandfather's, Dr. Samuel Loebenstein, autograph collection from over 1500 prominent leaders. Dr. Loebenstein's collection is unique because he would request the leaders to sign over a stamp that correlated with their vocation. Mr. Gerstley provides Dr. King with a stamp of George Washington Carver to carry on his grandfather's collection.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Wednesday, January 11, 1956
Washington, D.C., AUSTRIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kendel Jackson

Wednesday, July 17, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King sends a check to Dr. Jackson at St. Paul Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, to aid with reconstruction of the church.

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter From MLK to Mrs. William Lescase

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY

Dr.King thanks Mrs. William Lescaze for her contribution to the SCLC.