The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"New Orleans, LA"

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter Badeker writes to McDonald about the advancement from Gummessons Bokforlag for "Where Do We Go From Here."

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957
Little Rock, AR, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Arkansas (AR), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter of Invitation from Elroy C. Sandquist Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, July 19, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Mr. Sandquist writes to invite Dr. King to make an address at a luncheon for the City Club of Chicago.

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA)

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

Letter from William S. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William Thompson invites Dr. King to speak at the National Bar Association's 38th Annual Convention in Chicago, Illinois.


Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, California (CA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

Monday, December 4, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

Letter from Joan Daves to Pierre Servais

Friday, November 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, BELGIUM

Joan Daves writes to Pierre Servais in Belgium, thanking him for requesting the presence of Dr. King at the launching of a new edition of Strength to Love. She informs Mr. Servais that Dr. King's itinerary has not yet been set and that he will receive more information at a later date.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack H. O'Dell

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New Orleans, LA

In response to recent allegations, Dr. King and members of the SCLC Administrative Committee conduct a formal investigation on Mr. O'Dell's reported association with Communist affiliates. Dr. King regrettably informs him that due to this speculation, despite lack of concrete results, he must permanently resign from his position with the SCLC's New York office.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Fernando Arias-Salgado

Monday, May 22, 1967

Fernando Arias-Salgado acknowledges receipt of Ms. McDonald's letter on behalf of Dr. King and transmits it to Dr. Palasi in Madrid. He also encloses the initial letter of invitation to lecture at the University of Madrid under the signature of Dr. Villar, Director of Cultural Sociology.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Letter from MLK to Ivan Allen Jr.

Thursday, May 31, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Mayor Allen regarding a seemingly unfair price quota for the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium that the SCLC plans to use for the Harry Belafonte concert.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Letter from Robert Way to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Robert Way, Chairman of the Hadley Executive Committee, writes to correct a misunderstanding regarding restrictions on the contents of a lecture Dr. King is scheduled to deliver. Mr. Way assures Dr. King he has the freedom to express what he feels is important.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956
New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Letter from Mrs. W. J. Givan to MLK about Unsavory Association

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Givan expresses her dissatisfaction with Dr. King on how "prominent Negroes" are often photographed with "unsavory whites."

Response to SCLC Attendance at Cooperative League Meeting

Friday, July 28, 1967
Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Following up a letter sent by Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, Stanley Dreyer, president of The Cooperative League of the USA, writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson. Mr. Dreyer hopes that it will be possible for Rev. Jackson to be present at the meeting held in Des Plaines, Illinois on August 11.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Morehouse Anniversary

Friday, January 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, President Mays invites Dr. King to Morehouse's 100th Anniversary celebration.

Letter from Ken Dyal to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to acknowledge receipt of a telegram and agree with his comments in reference to an enclosed supporting newspaper article.

Letter from Rabbi Israel Miller to MLK

Friday, November 11, 1966

On the eighteenth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Rabbi Israel Miller, Chairman of the American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry, invites Dr. King to speak over a national telephone hook-up.

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

Letter from Reverend Michael Scott to MLK

Monday, December 3, 1962
London, England, Atlanta, GA

Reverend Michael Scott, of the International Committee for the Study of Group Rights in London, writes Dr. King expressing that the organization would like him to become an Honorary President. Scott explains, "this need not involve more than our being able to use your name."

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Monday, January 7, 1957
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.