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Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Tokyo, Japan, Atlanta, GA, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, CHINA

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Friday, March 16, 1962
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968
Washington, D.C.

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

Letter from Gaye Breitel to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

Gaye Breitel, a ten year old from New York, writes Dr. King to request an autographed photo or book with a recent picture.

Philosophy

Dr. King describes philosophy as being the "wholes of which sciences describe the parts." He states that the answers to questions will differ depending on the school of philosophy one references.

Telegram from Nicolas Nabokov to MLK

Friday, May 29, 1964
Montgomery, AL, ITALY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

The mayor of Florence, Italy telegrams Dr. King with hopes that he will accept an invitation to speak at the Mediterranean Colloquium Florence on racial issues occurring in the United States.

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Saturday, May 28, 1955
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Subsistance Pay for Voter Workers

Friday, December 31, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Copy of a Crusade for Citizenship disbursement check paid to an Alabama worker in a Voter Registaion program. Reason for disbursement is subsistance pay.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Saturday, May 30, 1964
South Carolina (SC)

After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

Terror in Louisiana

Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Shreveport, LA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL

The article describes the terrorist actions occurring within the area of north Louisiana. An African American dentist by the name of C.O. Simpkins was one of the victims targeted due to his activism in Civil Rights. Due to Simpkins large presence within the movement, his house was bombed and burned down. This is just one example of the constant hatred and violence many African Americans had to go through to gain equality within the South.

Post Card from Jerry Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

Jerry Smith writes to Dr. King who is in the Birmingham Jail. Smith accuses Dr. King of not being a genuine reverend, but a communist hate monger.

States Avoid Woes: Hughes and Stanley Attacks Deadbeats in UN

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Des Moines, IA, Iowa (IA), CONGO / ZAIRE, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

These are two articles from the Des Moines Sunday Register. The first article entitled "States Avoid Woes: Hughes" by Donald Kaul focuses on a statement by then Iowa Governor Harold Hughes. Hughes asserts that it is the right and responsibility of the states to solve domestic social problems. The other article explores the opinion of then state representative David Stanley. Stanley believes that all United Nations members should share in the operating costs of the UN.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from the Secretary General of the Oversees Vietnamese Buddhist Association

Saturday, April 29, 1967
FRANCE, VIETNAM

In this correspondence VO VAN AI request assistance in denouncing the massacre at the School of Youth For Social Services in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Gerald A. Feffer

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King informs Gerald A. Feffer that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Lehigh University. King states, "I can think of nothing that I enjoy more than discussing some of the vital issues of the day with college and university students."

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965
Atlanta, GA

The secretary of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees writes to Dr. King, enclosing the minutes of their meeting of April 10, 1965.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK

Memphis, TN

An anonymous person wrote this letter to Dr. King, telling him that he is "directly responsible" for the murder of a 16 year old boy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Social Ethics

Dr. King refers to Micah 3:9-12, saying the prophet condemns the love of money of civil and religious leaders. King wonders whether religious leaders today should be paid for their work and concludes that money should never be a priority over service.

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Representatives of the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order write Dr. King in response to anti-semitic statements made by members of SNCC. They ask that Dr. King provide a statement that condems SNCC's statement due to the fact the Jewish community has strongly supported the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alfred A. Haesler Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Thursday, October 5, 1967
SWITZERLAND

In this correspondence to Alfred A. Haesler, Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Haesler letter, inviting Dr. King to complete a writing assignment. However, due to prior engagements, Dr. King would not be able to complete any other publications, but offered that his book entitled, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?" answered most of the questions raised in the letter.

The Purpose of Religion

Dr. King argues that the purpose of religion is not to "perpetuate a dogma," but to create witnesses to the power of God. He also considers whether salvation comes from upholding a particular creed or whether it comes from an individual reconciling with God.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

Connecticut (CT), New York (NY), Washington (WA)

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from Edith Green to MLK

Monday, September 20, 1965
Washington, D.C., Oregon (OR)

Representative Edith Greene writes Dr. King concerning his previous telegram about the Mississippi challenge. Green concludes by agreeing with Dr. King's stance for a delegate vote in Mississippi.