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Letter from MLK to Elder Grant

Dr. King declines an earlier proposal suggested by Mr. Grant, due to a lack of resources and time.

Letter from MLK to Maj Palmberg

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dr. King's informs Miss Palmberg that he is unable to accept her invitation to visit Finland.

Letter from G. Mansfield Collins to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

G. Mansfied Collins outlines Dr. King's travel arrangements to a Christian Conference held in Southern California, in which Dr. King is urged to discuss unemployment.

Letter from Nile Magazine to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

In this letter, Charles Harris informs Dora McDonald about NIle's interest in endorsing a King/Spock political ticket and organizing a successful campaign for Dr. King and Dr. Spock.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Worship

Dr. King compares and contrasts God's place in the Catholic and Protestant church.

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Tisdale

Thursday, April 5, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Miss Tisdale that the information she requested may be found in Dr. King's book, Stride Toward Freedom, or Dr. Lawrence Reddick's book, Crusader Without Violence.

Letter from James P. Dixon to MLK Requesting a Donation

Monday, November 20, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Dixon discusses his early life, his journey to Antioch College, and requests help from Dr. King in funding the same program that put Dixon through college.

Letter From MLK to Mr. Berkowitz

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding demonstrations in Montgomery.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

Letter from Henry Moon to Rev. Abernathy concerning "In Memoriam" Reproductions

Thursday, April 18, 1968

This letter from Henry Lee Moon to Rev. Abernathy, accompanies enclosures of reproductions of documents associated with the "In Memoriam" sections of various newspapers in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Transcript of Tape Recording of Mr. Hanna Nazzal

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

This document is a transcript of a tape recording of the President of Terra Santa Tourist Company, Mr. Hanna Nazzal, that was sent to Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, December 15, 1964

West Virginia State College invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum and provides him with select dates to choose from. The college has extended an appreciation for various prime ministers, presidents, attorney generals, and other political figures for their support. Dr. King is congratulated from the college from the receipt of the Nobel Piece Prize.

Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Friday, March 17, 1967

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

Religion

Dr. King records William Ernest Hocking's definition of religion. Hocking's first name is omitted on the note card.

Poor People's Campaign Food Contribution List

This document is a list of the preliminary food contributions for the SCLC's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to Frank Jones

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King writes Rev. Jones of Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church in Atlanta to acknowledge receipt of his contribution to the Albany Movement. Dr. King informs Rev. Jones that his check will be forwarded to Dr. William G. Anderson, founder of the Albany Movement, to assist in the work of the desegregation alliance.

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."