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Letter from MLK to Arthur Stanley

Tuesday, December 26, 1967
Indiana (IN), Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks Arthur Stanley for raising funds to defray the salary expenses for David Wallace. He also expresses delight that Mr. Stanley will be attending the Operation Breadbasket meeting.

Letter from Edward Thacker to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arkansas (AR), Hot Springs, AR, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Edward Thacker, former State Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars for Arkansas, expresses his disagreement with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War. Thacker also contends that the eradication of poverty is an unrealistic goal.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966
New Hampshire (NH)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Letter from Mr. William A. Linsley to MLK

Wednesday, February 8, 1967
Texas (TX)

This document features a faculty member from the University of Houston conferring with Dr. King on "I Have a Dream" materials to be used for his students' curriculum.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Letter from Ms. Anne Braden to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Braden, staff member of the SCEF, writes Dr. King regarding fellow staff member, Joe Mulloy, who was planning to refuse induction into the US Army. In light of a recent SCLC member making a similar decision, Ms. Braden requests support from Dr. King.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Contributors List

This is a list of the organizations that contributed to the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

Illinois (IL), AUSTRALIA, ISRAEL, UGANDA, GERMANY

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

March for Peace Flyer

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

"Open Hearings Bill Offered in House"

Jackson, MS

This article addresses political concerns in Jackson, Mississippi, as introduced by John Perkins and Ralph Sowell Jr. The "freedom of information" act will allow the public to be active and aware of political actions. Any violation of this act will result in a penalty for the individual or organization.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Johann R. Goelz

Friday, August 16, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Johann Goelz expressing his appreciation for the kind remarks shared in a previous correspondence. King hopes that the current work in Birmingham will yield a success that sets the tone for better race relations in the South.

Telegram from Walter T. Dixon to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Walter T. Dixon, a City Councilman from Baltimore, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

MLK at the Jefferson County Armory

Tuesday, August 23, 1960
Louisville, KY

In this outline, Dr. King discusses voting and the importance of citizenship. One of the important points, in Dr. King's outline, states: "Political Parties Must Deliver on Their Promises."

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Prayer

Dr. King records a prayer.

Letter from Mervyn Dymally to MLK

Wednesday, October 25, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

California State Sen. Mervyn Dymally (D-CA) expresses appreciation and support to Dr. King for the efforts of the SCLC with Operation Breadbasket in Los Angeles, CA.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, St. Augustine, FL, Cleveland, OH, Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Illinois (IL), CONGO / ZAIRE, CANADA

Miss Dora McDonald provides Dr. King with a synopsis of updates regarding invitations and correspondences. She notifies Dr. King of the Ann Morris School of Arts attendance at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Eugene Carson Blake's response to Dr. King's acceptance to speak, and V. M. Herron requests of 300 "Black is Beautiful" pamphlets. In addition, she informs Dr. King of the recent telephone calls from various individuals.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York, NY, CHINA, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GUATEMALA, PERU, MEXICO

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

A Religion of Doing

Alabama (AL)

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

Schleiermacher (Elements of Pantheism)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion” and writes that it reminds him of Spinoza’s intellectual love of God. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

What Is Man?

GREECE, GERMANY

This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter from Geraldine Fothergill to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Geraldine Fothergill, a mother of seven of Hartford, Connecticut, offers Dr. King an idea about educating African American youths. She suggests that African American families develop a boarding program to house African American students that are accepted at traditionally white colleges distant from home. She also suggests that Dr. King, as a minister, can convince other ministers to support this program through the churches.

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.