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Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
London, England, New York, NY, New York (NY)

This letter from Ms. Daves to Dr. King features requests regarding his itinerary for his trip to England.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, shares a quotation from W.E.B. DuBois' "The Souls of Black Folk." The excerpt is consistent with Dr. King's view on the importance of "keeping white allies in the civil rights movement."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding "Strength To Love"

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY

This letter dated October 15, 1964, was sent to Dora McDonald from Joan Daves. Dora McDonald is the secretary to Dr.King. Joan Daves is writing to Ms. McDonald asking that Dr. King sign the French contracts for his book," Strength To Love" as soon as possible.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), CANADA

Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

The American Jewish Committee

Friday, March 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA, Dallas, TX, Texas (TX), Hartford, CT, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Michigan (MI)

The American Jewish Committee reports on two projects recommended by the Kerner Commission to address "the imbalance between white and Negro in America."

Montesquieu

Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
New York, NY

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."

Letter from MLK to Oklahomans for Negotiation Now

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Oklahoma City extended by Margaret Novitski of Oklahomans for Negotiation Now.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

SCLC Participates at Chicago Conference of New Politics

ISRAEL, Chicago, IL, SAUDI ARABIA

Dr. King asserts that "serious distortions" from the press have defaced the image of the SCLC in regards to the organization's involvement at the Chicago Conference of New Politics. Factually, at the conference, members of the SCLC were the most active and coherent opponents of the resolution in the Middle East. The SCLC perceives that the issue in the Middle East must involve security and development. The political realities and possible methods of improvement within the Middle East are discussed and elaborated upon.

Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive

Washington, D.C., California (CA), VIETNAM

This document discusses the Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive and the California Committee for the Peace and Freedom Party. The registration drive aims to place the Peace and Freedom Party on the 1968 California ballot with the purpose of opposing the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Also included is a partial list of the Peace and Freedom Party's endorsers, which includes 1962 Nobel Peace Prize recipient Linus Pauling.

The Committee of Responsibility Thanks Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, January 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Ohio (OH), Baltimore, MD, Philadelphia, PA, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA, Massachusetts (MA), California (CA), Connecticut (CT), San Francisco, CA, Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL, Denver, CO

Herbert L. Needleman, Chairman of The Committee of Responsibility, expresses his appreciation for Mrs. King's sponsorship of the program. He assures her that the response received regarding the program launch has been of great size.

Letter from Mr. Jonathan B. Weisbuch to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Weisbuch offers a monetary donation to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He praises Dr. King for his continued efforts in reforming the South and the entire country.

Young Americans Newsletter

Washington, D.C.

This Young Americans newsletter covers topics such as: The Vietnam War, Young Americans for Freedom, and the usage of violence for a good cause.

Infralapsarianism

Dr. King defines infralapsarianism.

Letter to the Managers of "Christianity Today'' from Rev Earl E. Josten

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Iowa (IA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 17, 1967, Josten writes to the managers of "Christianity Today" to inform them that he cannot comply with their request for names. He is not complying because of the attitude Christianity Today's editor is taking toward Dr. King. Rev. Josten is a pastor at The Methodist Church in Columbus Junction, Iowa. Josten offers prayer to the editor for his "terrible tirade" against King, and states that he will not commend this paper to any more friends if this attitude continues.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Friday, December 10, 1965
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Selma, AL

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

We Would See Jesus

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, GREECE

Dr. King gives this sermon to a congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He conveys a message of Christ's acceptance of all despite any person's wrong doings in the past. He also points out that Christ's work is exemplified through individual acts of kindness and helping others.

Transcript of Tape Recording of Mr. Hanna Nazzal

Wednesday, June 21, 1967
JORDAN, ISRAEL

This document is a transcript of a tape recording of the President of Terra Santa Tourist Company, Mr. Hanna Nazzal, that was sent to Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young.

Royalty Statement for Casterman Published Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

This royalty statement references royalties earned for a French-language edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

Tuesday, November 2, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Testament by Martin A. Watkins

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Philadelphia, PA, North Carolina (NC), SPAIN, Berlin, Germany, JAPAN, Texas (TX), Memphis, TN

Martin Watkins covers an array of topics in his expression of poems entitled "Testament." With great admiration, Watkins presents this book of poetry to Dr. King. In the preface, Watkins explains his purpose of publishing these poems during the Korean War. He further elaborates on his admiration of the Negro, his preoccupation with death, and the identification with Christ.

Crozer Theological Seminary Brochure

Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This brochure provides information about Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. The brochure lists full details of the campus, programs of study, and admissions.

Letter from Edward O'Brien to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT)

Edward O'Brien writes Dr. King inquiring about the release of his new book, as he is unable to find it in bookstores.

Telegram from Robert J. Brown to MLK

Robert J. Brown writes Dr. King with prayerful wishes, encouraging strength in his fight for civil rights.

Instructions for Honorary Degree Recipients

This document reflects instructions for Dr. King as the recipient of an honorary degree from Yale University. The program also includes some random handwritten notes by Dr. King and information regarding his seating arrangement.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.