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Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

Letter from H. M. Joshi to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

H. M. Joshi of India communicates with Dr. King following Dr. King's address at Howard University on the subject of nonviolence. He informs Dr. King about Khan Abdul Ghafar Khan and his influence as a nonviolent soldier in India. Joshi also requests a combination of Dr. King's statements and publications surrounding nonviolence.

SCLC Virginia Program with MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965

This is the program for SCLC's Virginia State Unit's observance of Nobel Peace Prize Day at Virginia State College, with Dr. King as guest speaker.

Rep. Powell Unseating to Stick?

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

This article discusses public opinion surrounding former U.S. House Representative Adam Clayton Powell's ethics investigation, and subsequent ousting from office.

Thank You Letter from MLK Regarding Albany Incarceration

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King thanks his supporters for sending him encouraging letters during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia.

Worship

Dr. King quotes a passage regarding worship, from Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

Letter from Minister C. Vernon Lake to MLK About a Vietnam Strategy

Monday, January 15, 1968

Minister C. Vernon Lake writes Dr. King with an enclosure containing a new strategy for vietnam. His plan is built on the shoulders of the World War II "Marshall Plan."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Letter from Bea Lazar to Dora McDonald

Friday, December 22, 1961

Bea Lazar thanks Miss McDonald for sending a copy of a recent speech given by Dr. King. She praises the speech as a lesson that Americans "sorely need." She also encloses a contribution to the SCLC as a Christmas present.

Note Explaining Reason for Coming to Los Angeles

This document explains that Dr. King came to Los Angeles at the invitation of major organizations and concerned individuals.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Letter from Edmund Gordon to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Edmund W. Gordon expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's agreement to use his name in connection with the development of a Memorial Park honoring W.E.B Dubois. Mr. Gordon also informs Dr. King of the other participants of the project along with a brief description of his professional background.

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Letter from MLK to Leonard Smalls

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at The Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church due to preaching responsibilities at his own church. He also thanks Rev. Smalls for the offer to fundraise for the SCLC.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Letter from Robert Pritchard to The Benjamin Franklin Institute

Friday, April 7, 1967

As a result of being investigated by Mr. Aguiliar, a staff member of the Benjamin Franklin Institute, Robert Pritchard, writes the director of the institute expressing his grievances. A carbon copy of this letter was sent to the National Headquaters, SCLC and NAACP.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from MLK to Cal David Gleaton

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Dr. King thanks Rev. Cal Gleaton for his letter in support of the work of the SCLC. Dr. King tells Gleaton that the letter was uplifting and that his contribution to the morale and the spirit of the freedom movement is mostly appreciated by the staff of the SCLC.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Letter from Reverend Robert Jacoby to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Reverend Robert Jacoby informs Dr. King that his Letter From Birmingham Jail was used in the Sunday worship service sermon.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Bernard of Clairvaux"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK about Request

Monday, October 26, 1964

Alfred Duckett writes this letter to Dr. King in order to remind Dr. King of his desire to have a magazine article or television special done on him and stresses the need to present Dr. King's role "not only as a civil rights leader, but also as a father, pastor, husband, and administrator of a steadily-growing national organization." Mr. Duckett also presents the terms of a proposed publishing contract, should he wish to become a part of the project.