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"Norfolk, VA"

Letter from Herbert J. Kramer to John W. Bloomer

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Herbert J. Kramer informs the managing editor of Birmingham News, about "America's New Commitment" and the "Plowshare Pledge."

Black Power and Liberation: A Communist View

New York (NY), New York, NY

Arnold Johnson, Public Relations Director of Communist Party U. S. A, requests commentary on Claude Lightfoot's pamphlet "A Note on Black Power and Liberation." The pamphlet has sparked discussions in the public press and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Go to Black Africa

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

An unknown author writes to Dr. King advising that he return to Africa if he is unhappy with his plight in America.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Pittsburgh, PA, San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962
Atlanta, GA

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Religious Education

Dr. King discusses the topic of religious education. King asserts that religious education should not become a substitute for personal evangelism and that "religious instruction without conversion is comparatively ineffective."

Letter from Rev. Max F. Daskam to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests the return of Dr. King's presence for their Pulpit Schedule of the current year. Years have passed since Dr. King has visited and the church "would rejoice" if he could provide a date.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Colorado (CO)

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule

Monday, August 3, 1964
New York, NY, UNITED KINGDOM

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Victor Weybright will telephone his London organization. Joan then suggests that Dr. King make himself available in London on August 17.

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter from William H. Booth to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Commission on Human Rights Chairman William Booth invites Dr. King and a designated representative to a conference in New York entitled, "Testing Human Potential - New Techniques for Selecting Employees from Minority Groups."

I Will Vote For You

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Joe Kozne proclaims allegiance to Dr. King and his political aspirations if George Wallace, the governor of Alabama, runs for presidency.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Thursday, July 18, 1963
Missouri (MO)

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966
Chicago, IL

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

Letter from Cindy Eder to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Cindy Eder sends Dr. King warm wishes for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Robert Epstein

Thursday, November 15, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Robert Epstein regarding the objective of SCLC. King states, "No man can comment adequately on his own motives... I would hope agape is the driving force in our movement." Dr. King encloses a pamphlet entitled "This is SCLC."

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), VIETNAM

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Letter from John Yungblut to MLK

Monday, January 16, 1961
Atlanta, GA, New Orleans, LA

John Yungblut writes to Dr. King to confirm his ability to lead a seminar for the Atlanta Meeting's Quaker House on the Philosophy and Practice of Non-violence.

Letter From Irving Neiman to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
Connecticut (CT), GERMANY

Irving Neiman offers his legal services to the SCLC for their work in the civil rights movement.

Voter Registration and Population Statistics

South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL)

This document lists statistical data for five southern states. The data categories include the overall voting-age populations, which is further broken down by race and registered versus unregistered voters.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Wednesday, July 17, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Resource Teachers

This document lists the eight duties of Resource Teachers, and includes targeted instruction for how this group should interact with base teachers and students.

Letter from Eulah M. Eubank to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Eulah Eubank writes Dr. King regarding the Washington, D.C. Camp-In. She states she is "not...opposed" to marches and sit-ins, but feels that the Camp-In would be counter-productive. She believes it "will ad [sic] fuel to fires the extremists are trying build."

Letter from Helen Ramirez to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Chicago, IL

Helen Ramirez of The Brunswick Foundation informs Dr. King that they cannot donate to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

MLK Note Card - Schleiermacher, Theology and God-consciousness

The person to whom Dr. King is referring is the German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher.

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

The False God of Money

Sunday, July 19, 1953

This sermon titled "The False God of Money" was preached by Dr. King on July 19, 1953. Dr. King raised a question to his congregation stating, "Will you serve the transitory god of money which is here today and gone tomorrow or will you serve the eternal God of the universe who is the same yesterday, today and forever?"

Letter from MLK to John Williams Mannix

Monday, September 23, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Mr. Mannix that he will not be able to speak in Washington for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association.