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"Norfolk, VA"

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Letter from Robert Balkind to Rev. Abernathy about NAACP

Monday, April 15, 1968

This letter, written by the CEO of Hampton Manufacturing Co., references an attached letter for the NAACP.

Letter from David J. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

David Walker, Chairman of the Speakers Committee for Toronto Junior Board of Trade writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at their Tuesday night dinner meeting. Walker continues with his own personal adulation on the Reverend receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Courtland Cox to MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Courtland Cox of SNCC writes Dr. King reminding him that several of their members are away in Africa and informs him that Mr. Lewis will not be able to attend his convention.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Voting Rights

Thursday, March 18, 1965

President Johnson offers his gratitude to Dr. King for supporting his advocacy before Congress of legislation guaranteeing universal voting rights.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Letter from MLK to Nathaniel Barber

Friday, July 23, 1965

Dr. King thanks Nathaniel Barber for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief overview of the work done by the organization.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Erik Ruden

Tuesday, March 17, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Erik Ruden that Dr. King will only be able to speak twice during his upcoming trip to London and that an associate will need to travel with Dr. King.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

SCLC Northern City Tour

SCLC provides an organizational manual that outlines details regarding their Northern city tour. They are traveling to cities in the northern United States in order to assess social conditions and build relationships amongst civil rights leadership. The manual also provides tour dates and suggestions for organizing the tour.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Direction of the Movement

The author expresses her opinion about Dr. King and how he should use his "impressive" vocabulary in the right direction. She further elaborates on her perceptions of the police protection, mobs, labor needs, and more.

Monroe, Mich. News, "From the Book Bag"

Monday, June 26, 1967

A review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was published by the Monroe, Michigan newspaper. The review outlined the positions Dr. King took on the Vietnam War and the Black Power movement. The author of this review considered Dr. King to be "an advocate-articulate, persistent and exhortative." Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was published and released in 1967.

Letter from Chester Robinson to Harry Belafonte

Friday, October 6, 1961

In this letter, the Executive Director and Field Organizer of WSO - West Side Organization, in Chicago, asks Harry Belefonte to work with some of the youth in their community.

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Different Meanings of Prehension

Dr. King outlines the different meanings of "prehension" in Alfred North Whitehead's books Science and the Modern World and Process and Reality.

Letter from David Gibbons and David O. Woodward to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963

David Woodyard and David Gibbons send Dr. King a check to support the work of the SCLC. Woodyard and Gibbons are employed at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

Evil

Dr. King quotes Harris Franklin Rall's "Christianity," highlighting the topic "the evil of the universe."

Letter from Phillip O. Foss to MLK

Monday, February 13, 1967

Phillip O. Foss requests permission to use excerpts from "Letter from Birmingham Jail".

Immortality (By Tennyson)

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Alfred, Lord Tennyson's "The Ancient Sage."

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.