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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from MLK to Rev. William A. Dennis

Monday, January 20, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN

Dr. King requests the presence of Reverend Dennis at a SCLC Executive Board meeting in Atlanta, GA. Reverend Dennis responds by stating he will not be able to attend, but he will send someone in his place.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966
Virginia (VA)

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Telegram from MLK to the Fairmont Hotel

Saturday, September 16, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Dr. King writes to the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco California, requesting a reservation of two single rooms.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Invitation for MLK to Speak at Bryn Mawr College

Tuesday, January 4, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

The class of 1966 from Bryn Mawr College invite Dr. King to be the baccalaureate speaker for their service on Sunday May 29th. They remind Dr. King that he was scheduled to speak previously but other engagements prevented him from doing so.

Report of Director of Mission Development

Chicago, IL, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Indiana (IN)

Rev. Dr. Archie Hargraves was a distinguished urban minister and church leader who served America's cities for more than half a century. In this report he gives a summary of individual organizations under Mission Development, of which he was the Director. All of these organizations aimed to augment employment and economic opportunities for their respective surrounding communities.

Letter from Gail Lamb to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Gail Lamb requests information from Dr. King for her research on prejudice, especially on "manifestations, kinds, and objects of prejudice."

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL)

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
New York, NY

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

Letter from MLK on behalf of Cosby Wallace

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King requests reconsideration of Mr. Cosby Wallace's status in the U. S. Army. The financial strain on Mr. Wallace’s family and a physical disability warrants his not being inducted.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

South Carolina (SC)

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Illinois (IL)

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

MLK's notecard regarding social gospel

Dr. King outlines his views on social gospel.

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, Nebraska (NE), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Ohio (OH), Pennsylvania (PA)

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Social Justice in Modern Society

In the following document, Dr. King comments on the "social stagnation" of the world, despite impressive advances in science and technology. He believes that without moral character and social justice, civilization will self-destruct.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Letter from Richard Chapin to S.C.L.C Board of Directors

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Michigan (MI)

The East Lansing Human Relations Commission writes to express their heartfelt sorrow over the tragic loss of Dr. King. They vow to continue the work of advancing freedom with renewed effort.

Letter from Emma Kramer to MLK

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Chicago, IL, South Dakota (SD), Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The secretary of the Speakers Bureau at The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago contacts Dr. King regarding a number of new and pending speaking engagements. The two new speaking engagement requests are from Augustana College and Barat College. The list of pending engagements includes Villanova University, Duchess Community College, Barat College and the University of California, Riverside.

Memorandum Regarding The March On Washington For Jobs and Freedom

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

In this memorandum, Bayard Rustin provides various civil rights leaders with the agenda for their upcoming leadership meeting regarding the 1963 March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Monday, July 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

New York, NY, New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Wisconsin (WI), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.

Religious Witness For Human Dignity Booklet

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Los Angeles, CA

Religious Witness for Human Dignity seeks the support of members of the Protestant, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Jewish Communities in the struggle for civil rights.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. R. Schippers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
NETHERLANDS

Rev. Young informs Dr. Schippers of arrival details for an upcoming trip to Amsterdam, Holland.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965
VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, CUBA, Florida (FL), Hawaii (HI), HUNGARY, GUATEMALA, IRAN, BRAZIL

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."