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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.

International Vacation Courses

Friday, November 22, 1963

Miss Margaret Scattergood invites Dr. King to Denmark to address the issues of the struggle in the United States to give the Negro full partnership in American society.

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. August Schou

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves addresses Mr. Schou's request to have copyright assignment to the speech which Dr King delivered at the University of Oslo, after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She stipulates to Mr. Schou's "first call" but stresses the importance of copyright protocol "after Oslo."

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from Jack Malpas to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1961

Jack Malpas, a member of the Episcopal Church's Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, contributed financially to the SCLC. Mr. Malpas informs Dr. King that he is working on the appeal for the Prayer Pilgrimage and expresses his previous experience in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Ritschl (Christology)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from William H. Gray to Eugene Rhoads

Friday, April 19, 1963

William H. Gray encloses an article regarding advice given to Dr. King by Billy Graham. Graham admits that he "is not a thoroughgoing integrationist. "

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1961

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

A Proposal for Unity Day

Tuesday, March 15, 1966

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

Letter from Rita Machelle Foster to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rita Machelle Foster, an eighth grade student a Harvard Elementary School, requests any information or documentation provided by Dr. King for her composition on Negro History Week. Ms. Foster asks that Dr. King provide a photograph and discuss the James Meredith situation.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Telegram from Roland Wolf

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this Western Union telegram, Roland Wolf requests Dr. King's appearance on a "conversation show" with one or two writers, allowing an opportunity to learn his views on existing issues.

Letter from Phillip S. Gelb to MLK

Saturday, May 4, 1963

Mr. Phillip Gelb encloses a donation to the SCLC and states that he appreciates the efforts being made by the protestors in Birmingham. Furthermore, he identifies the movement as the "most vital and pro-American in the nation today."

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor

Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Hosea

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Hosea and his views of God.

I Have Decided to Start With Myself

Monday, August 14, 1967

This dictation of the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet includes speeches given by Dr. King, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, and Andrew Young. The keynote address given by Mr. Sidney Poitier concluded the evening, along with a presentation of an award.

Letter from Frances Pauley to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964

Mrs. Pauley, Executive Director of the Georgia Council on Human Relations, thanks Dr. King for his contribution to her organization.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."