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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves' Office to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York, NY, London, England, FRANCE, GERMANY, SWEDEN, NORWAY, ITALY, FINLAND, DENMARK, SPAIN, JAPAN

This letter from Ms. Daves' office to Dr. King is a breakdown of various foreign rights royalties to "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos Or Community?".

Outline of The Distinctions In God's Creation

This outline of Dr. King's sermon entitled, "The Distinctions of God's Creation," references Thomas Aquinas. The document suggests focusing on the central message that God created all beings and features of nature, each with its own unique form and purpose.

Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL

Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Letter from Detroit Resident to MLK

Monday, November 21, 1966
Detroit, MI

The Detroit resident identifies the Negro man's concept of equality as being intertwined with the sexual exploitation of white women. The author references an article that cites the disparity in numbers of illegitimate children amongst blacks and white.

School of Youth for Social Service

VIETNAM, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

The School of Youth for Social Service in South Vietnam aided in immediate war relief, as well as a long range of programs such as rural health & sanitation, agriculture, and illiteracy.

Acceptance Letter from Rollan Henry of Tuskegee Institute to Scott B. Smith

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Tuskegee, AL

In this letter, Mr.Henry informs Mr.Smith that he has been accepted to Tuskegee Institute.

Letter from Grace Pruitt to Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, December 15, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Grace Pruitt writes to Ms. McDonald informing her that the American Friends Service Committee does not have a large enough stock of "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" to send her 200 copies.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
New York (NY)

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Berl Bernhard

Wednesday, February 6, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Berl Bernhard that Dr. King has a prior engagement out of the country and cannot attend the civil rights planning conference. McDonald states, "He asked me to say to you that he would be grateful if you would send him a copy of the report of the conference."

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton request the Leeds & Northrup Foundation provide a grant to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Chauncey Eskridge includes a tax exempt letter and a copy of the trust instrument outlining the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Both Dr. King and Mr. Bernard Jackson received a copy of this letter.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Montgomery, AL, Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Tuskegee, AL, Chattanooga, TN

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Ohio (OH), Montgomery, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Washington, D.C.

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

Letter from Gregory Bergman to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
California (CA), Berkeley, CA

Mr. Bergman asks if he could receive a copy of Dr. King's speech given at Riverside Church. He regarded the speech as "one of the great speeches of our time."

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

Monday, February 26, 1968
Jacksonville, FL, Washington, D.C.

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, London, England, Illinois (IL)

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Marvin Wachman Invites MLK to Speak at Lincoln University

Friday, August 16, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Marvin Wachman, President of Lincoln University, invites Dr. King to a speaking engagement.

Letter from Reverend Michael Scott to MLK

Monday, December 3, 1962
London, England, Atlanta, GA

Reverend Michael Scott, of the International Committee for the Study of Group Rights in London, writes Dr. King expressing that the organization would like him to become an Honorary President. Scott explains, "this need not involve more than our being able to use your name."

Letter from Angela Reyes to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Angela Reyes offers her condolences to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King.

MLK Upon Landing at New York City

Wednesday, March 18, 1959
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA

Dr. King expresses his enjoyment upon his return from India. He also gives his opinion on a few issues in India such as India's struggling economy. He first advises that Western nations should aid India in improving their economy. Then he compares the caste system to the race problem in America.

The Tension Between Life's Palm Sunday and Life's Good Friday

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church in April of 1960. In this sermon he discussed two days of prime importance in the life of Jesus namely Palm Sunday, "the moment of fulfillment" and Good Friday, the day of his crucifixion.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968
New York, NY

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.

Letter from Ben Carper to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, West Virginia (WV)

Ben Carper expresses his opinion in regards to Dr. King's position on Communism. Mr. Carper states that Dr. King is, "playing hand in glove with Godless Communists."

Notes for an Address to Memphis Strikers

Dr. King drafted these notes, which were used in an address given in Memphis, Tennessee in March of 1968. "Dives" is a Biblical character who refused to give aid to the poor and was condemned for it.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA

In this letter to Dr. King, Mr. Sakrikar offers a statue of Mahatma Gandhi for a children's park. He then explains the importance of this statue to the vision and practices of Dr. King as it relates to the methodology of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Dr. King to Mr. David George Ball

Thursday, October 23, 1958
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. George Ball, of the Yale University Christian Association, for the kind outpouring of support during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from French Organization Regarding American Outreach

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
FRANCE

This letter, dated January 23,1968, was sent among French colleagues who are in support of promoting understanding and cooperation between Protestant and Catholic educationists in America and France.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.