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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from the Children of Bulstrode School to MLK

The Bullstrode School Children write Dr. King to inform him of their fundraising efforts with the sale of daffodils from their community garden in hopes that it will assist poor Negro children.

SCLC and The American Foundation on Nonviolence: Proposal for Housing

The American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC set forth a proposal for low cost self-help housing in Greene County, Alabama.

Letter from John G. Kirk to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

John G. Kirk of Metromedia asks Dr. King to write an editorial for a future publication called "America Now." Dr. King's article is to be based on the assumption that it is the responsibility of the government to enhance the dignity of individual citizens.

Invitation from Saint Vincent College to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1963

Ralph J. Hils Jr., Director of Assemblies, invites Dr. King to address the student body at St. Vincent's College. He shares a local encounter with discrimination against their American and African Negro students. Mr. Hils outlines the history of the college and provides the names of other prominent visitors of the campus.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters of Stone Mountain, Georgia congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Youth in the World of Work

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Telegram from R. T. Blackwell to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

R. T. Blackwell informs Dr. King that he will be unable to attend an upcoming board meeting due to issues with a farmers cooperative proposal and a funding crisis.

God

Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

Thursday, July 25, 1963

The document shown here is a book royalty statement for Dr. King's first book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

The Gospel and How We Love Our Enemies

John C. Heidbrink sets forth the notion that in order to be a disciple of Christ, in any age, one must express unconditional love "toward him who seeks to destroy us," irrespective of differences in personal, national, or religious sentiments.

Newspaper Article "Negro Nation Ratified"

This article discusses a group of black nationalists who ratified a declaration of independence for a separate Negro nation. The new nation was named the "Republic of New Africa."

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. Jesse Jackson

Dr. King writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson, urgently requesting his presence at a meeting of the Action Committee for Washington.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Numbers regarding the topic of God.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Telegram Plea to Dr. King

Friday, March 29, 1968

An American citizen writes Dr. King pleading for him not to blame whites for all of the misunderstandings in the US.

The Birth of a New Nation

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966

Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."

Telegram to MLK from 347 AFL-CIO Armours Lard Refinery Workers

The Local 347 of the AFL-CIO sent this Western Union Telegram to Dr. King as an expression of their hopes for his recovery, during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Draft of Where Do We Go From Here?

This document is a selection of a draft from Chapter VI of "Where Do We Go From Here," which is featured in the book "The World House."

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.