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Anonymous Letter to MLK

The writer informs Dr. King that he or she is repulsed with Dr. King and laments the day that "your people get to rule this country."

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Monday, September 14, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Newsday: Poor Listeners

Tuesday, November 15, 1966
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ)

The writer issues an indictment of the current Presidential administration for its failure to listen to others' views of the situation in Vietnam.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

Thursday, December 3, 1959
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, FRANCE, GERMANY, Virginia (VA), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA)

In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.

Telegram from Francis Lucas to Lucille Banta

Friday, January 17, 1969

Francis Lucas, assistant to Coretta Scott King, informs Lucille Banta of a scheduling conflict. She also requests information about which people "have agreed to sign the cable gram to His Holiness Pope Paul."

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Letter from Douglas Elleby to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964
BRAZIL, SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

The Governor of Brazil, Adhemar de Barros, congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Governor Barros expounds on what the Nobel Peace Prize stirred in the Brazilian nation. Sao Paulo, the larges city in Brazil, aspires to form a sense of fellowship with Dr. King and extend the appropriate honors for a man of peace.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968
San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

Dr. King's Revealing Report On 'Summer of Discontent'

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's responses to the events in Birmingham, Alabama during the summer of 1963 are reported in this Chicago Sun-Times article.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Letter from Stacey McCloud to MLK

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Stacey McCloud writes to Dr. King suggesting that he, Stokley Carmichael and others relocate to Africa and march.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Joanne Baker

In this letter, Dr. King offers his instructions and a statement pertaining to the history of the "Negro Revolution of the 1960's," including a statement on the Watts and Harlem riots.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Letter from Clara Horner to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Tennessee (TN)

Clara Horner criticizes the methods of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes that instead of marching, Dr. King should work in higher education.

Letter from Katherine H. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, March 27, 1965
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Katherine H. Jackson writes Dr. King on behalf of the late Reverend James J. Reeb. The Marin County Board of Supervisors declared March 20, James J. Reeb Memorial Day. Contributions were received throughout the county and forwarded to the SCLC. In addition, Jackson invites Dr. King to Marin County at a later, more convenient date.

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, THAILAND, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves' Office to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York, NY, London, England, FRANCE, GERMANY, SWEDEN, NORWAY, ITALY, FINLAND, DENMARK, SPAIN, JAPAN

This letter from Ms. Daves' office to Dr. King is a breakdown of various foreign rights royalties to "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos Or Community?".

Letter from Pamela Buckler to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Ms. Buckler writes Dr. King requesting SCLC literature on Negro politics for her sociology paper.

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

New York, NY

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Ex-West Sider

Chicago, IL

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Campbell to MLK

Monday, August 24, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Delaware (DE), New Jersey (NJ), Maryland (MD)

The Philadelphia District of The Methodist Youth Fellowship asks Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an upcoming freedom rally.

Letter from Ellen Silver to MLK

Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Silver writes to Dr. King to inform him that his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" will be edited for the publication of the textbook "The Triple Revolution: Social Problems in Depth."

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.