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"North Carolina (NC)"

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

Thank You Note to Martin Luther King Jr. from Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Sunday, July 30, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King from the Mt.Olive Baptist Church. They were sending a donation to the SCLC and thanking them for rebuilding their church that had been burned.

United Auto Workers Convention Speech

Monday, May 1, 1961

Dr. King delivered this speech at the 1961 United Automobile Workers convention. He highlights the changes that have taken place in organized labor. He also connects the organized labor movement to equal opportunity in housing and the political process.

Christian Social Philosophy II

New York (NY)

An outline briefly explains T.S. Eliot's opinion on culture and how it pertains to religion, specifically Christianity. Notes taken on the side of the outline insinuate that Western culture is beginning to disintegrate because the values it was built on are decreasing in importance.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Evelyn White

Wednesday, November 22, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that he received the materials sent to him. He also notes that he is unable to make a decision regarding his schedule and availability.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966
Chicago, IL, California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Maine (ME), Atlanta, GA

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Memphis, TN

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding a Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter Joan Daves informs Dr. King that a copy of the jacket text for "Where Do We Go from Here" is enclosed.

Letter from Donna Mitchell to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Donna Mitchell, an African American youth from Detroit, writes Dr. King to extend her support and express her appreciation for what he and others are doing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from James Scheuer to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

In this letter to Dr. King, Congressman Scheuer asks Dr. King to testify at a hearing of the Select Subcommittee on Labor of the House Committee on Education and Labor about House Resolution 12962. This bill focused on creating a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968
VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, BELGIUM, New York, NY

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

House Illustrations by the Fair Housing Council in Greater Cleveland

Cleveland, OH

African Americans face discrimination in several suburbs of Cleveland Ohio. The Fair housing Council developed to promote integrated housing options.

Letter from MLK to Thomas K. Gilhool

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King apologizes for his tardy response to a previous letter from Thomas Gilhool. He also expresses regret for his inability to speak at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Letter from MLK to The Boston Globe

Friday, February 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King expresses gratitude to The Boston Globe for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Nathaniel H. Simpson to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966
Chicago, IL

The West Side Chamber of Commerce, Inc. sends Dr. King a membership certificate honoring him for his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Public Affairs Memorandum

Monday, December 27, 1965
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA, Connecticut (CT), Ohio (OH), Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Boston, MA, New Jersey (NJ)

Vice President Humphrey is quoted as saying, "This is a pragmatic program - what's best is what works", in describing the Office of Economic Opportunity program. This public affairs memorandum details the efforts of the organization as it pertains to the anti-poverty movement.

Financial Statement for SCLC - OEO

Monday, May 15, 1967
Alabama (AL)

The Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the SCLC sends this budget outline to the Office of Economic Opportunity in request of financial changes.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Telegram from Rev. Phillip J. Bailey to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Rev. Bailey, on behalf of the Interdenominational Ministers Meeting of Greater New York, wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

Authoritarianism

Dr. King quotes William Pepperell Montague's "Ways of Knowing."

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA, Tennessee (TN), South Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), West Virginia (WV)

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Carolyn W. Ferriday

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Carolyn Ferriday for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Promotional Ad in Publisher's Weekly for "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, March 8, 1964
New York (NY)

This ad, published in Publisher's Weekly, serves to promote Dr.King's book "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from MLK to Mr. Adelman

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Adelman's letter, which included a Thomas Babington Macaulay quotation that Dr. King finds still applicable.