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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Letter from Susan Drubin to SCLC

Florida (FL)

Ms. Drubin desires to make a monetary contribution to the SCLC to continue the work of Dr. King. As such, she writes to obtain more information about the procedures for contributing a percentage of her annual salary. She finalizes her letter by noting that she is taking a speech course in which she hopes to use the information sent to her to draft a speech.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Letter from P.B. Boorsma to MLK

Friday, August 6, 1965

The president of the Students Almanac Committee of the Free University of Amsterdam is requesting a biographical sketch of Dr. King to feature in their 1965 edition. The committee is featuring Dr. King because he will soon be awarded the "doctor's degree of honour" at the Free University of Amsterdam.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967
Brooklyn, NY

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The Morehouse Board of Trustees sends Dr. King a letter to accept the Committee's recommendation to elect Dr. Hugh Gloster as the next president of Morehouse College.

Invitation from the United Nations to Mr. and Mrs. Popper

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY, New York, NY

The United Nations Representatives for the United States of America and Norway invite Mr. and Mrs. Popper to attend an event in honor of Dr. King.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New York, NY

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Telegram from MLK to Terry Shaw

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King telegrams Terry Shaw stating that the staff of SCLC sends their "deepest sympathy" in his time of grief.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 22, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

Letter from John Roney to Dr. King

Saturday, February 17, 1968
California (CA), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mr. Roney explains to Dr. King that the government will create oppressed social hierarchy within society. As a result, he requests that Dr. King responds to his plea or he will be believe that the rumors of government oppression are true.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King

New York (NY)

This royalty statement for the period of January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964 is for the Dutch-language edition of "Strength to Love," published by Van Loghum Slaterus.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

Telegram from Dick Rettig to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Philadelphia, PA

Dick Rettig, President of the United States National Student Association, writes Dr. King to express the organization's solidarity with the sit-in movment.

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King expresses thanks to Mr. Johnson for the international support as demonstrated by the success of the recent Palais des Sports benefit. MLK goes on to elaborate on the impact of "friends of the Movement" in far away places such as Europe.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Old Bull, The Great Violinist

Dr. King relates the mishap of a great violinist, during a concert, to the general act of overcoming obstacles in life.

Letter from Prarthana Samaj Bombay (India) to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
New York, NY, INDIA, London, England, NETHERLANDS

The former ambassador of India to the United States previously wrote Dr. King, inviting him to the Centenary Celebrations. The author recalls this invitation and references the history of Bombay's Prarthana Samaj. The organization is founded on the betterment of society, religion and education. The Prarthana Samaj would be proud to welcome Dr. King, as he is an "apostle" of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Morehouse Anniversary

Friday, January 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, President Mays invites Dr. King to Morehouse's 100th Anniversary celebration.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Charles Darwin's "The Origin of Species."

Letter to MLK Regarding Swedish Record Sales

Monday, April 25, 1966
SWEDEN

Chris Folcker follows up with Dr. King regarding sales figures and payments related to the sale of a recording in Sweden.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Colorado (CO)

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

The Sickness of our Society

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Letter from Erskine Caldwell to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
California (CA)

Noted author Erskine Caldwell congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Caldwell's works, including the highly acclaimed book Tobacco Road, addressed poverty, racism and social problems in his native South.

The Black Revolution

California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), BRAZIL, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.