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"Ohio (OH)"

Letter from MLK to Hal Lenke

Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Hal Lenke for investigating the situation in Huntsville, Alabama and reporting his findings to SCLC. He is currently considering Lenke's suggestions. Lenke later coordinated press relations for Resurrection City, the Poor People’s Campaign encampment in Washington, DC.

Letter to Mrs. H.G. Smith from MLK

Wednesday, October 13, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Smith for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the current efforts of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Letter From MLK to John R. Kellam Regarding Vietnam War

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Rhode Island (RI)

Dr. King thanks Kellam for not only his letter but for forwarding a letter from Democratic Rhode Island Senator John Pastore. All three men oppose the war in Vietnam, and Dr. King responds that is becoming increasingly difficult to understand the reasons behind US foreign policy.

Letter from Committee on Racial Justice

Sunday, February 11, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

In this letter, the Committee on Racial Justice provides update on their activities and encouragement.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Monday, February 26, 1962
Ohio (OH), New York (NY), New York, NY, NETHERLANDS, BRAZIL, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from MLK to Hattie Brown

Thursday, July 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes Hattie Brown, President of the Women's Society at Tremont Baptist Church, expressing his deep appreciation to Reverend Ruland and the members of the Society for their financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Wayne C. Hess

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Rev. Hess and the participants in the Illinois Conference Evangelical United Brethren Church for their contribution to the SCLC.

Miss Mahalia Jackson in Concert

Sunday, December 1, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference presents Miss Mahalia Jackson in concert, marking "another milestone in her personal dedication to the drive for complete freedom for all humanity."

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Missouri (MO), RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Letter from Omer Allison to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Allison expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King's representation of the Negro race, the church and the Kingdom of God.

Hegel System Diagram

Dr. King outlines notes regarding Hegel's system, which includes logic, nature, the mind and the spirit.

Program - Dexter Avenue Baptist Church 18th Anniversary Banquet 1957

Friday, December 13, 1957
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

The printed program, shown here, was for an anniversary banquet, in celebration of the 80th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King became the pastor at Dexter Avenue from 1954-1960. Mr. T.M. Alexander, of Atlanta, Georgia, is listed as the keynote speaker. Dr. King delivered the invocation and closing remarks for the anniversary banquet, held on December 13, 1957.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Norwegian Peace Initiative

Friday, January 6, 1967
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

Five Norwegians concerned about the Vietnam conflict propose that winners of the Nobel Peace Prize form a negotiating delegation to visit the US and Hanoi governments.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the "Book of Isaiah" referencing the universality of sin.

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.

Reason (Its Value in Revelation)

Dr. King quotes John Locke’s “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book IV.”

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., JAPAN

Robert Kennedy writes Dr. King requesting to interview him for an oral history program on the Kennedy Administration. Kennedy asserts, "You are obviously one of the persons who ought to be interviewed in order to get a full record of the Administration."

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Virginia (VA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes William James' view of metaphysics.

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

Letter from Eric Weinburger to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Eric Weinburger requests the assistance of Dr. King in publicizing the Committee for Nonviolent Action's tax refusal campaign.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Exodus

EGYPT

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Biblical book of Exodus. Highlighted topics include knowledge, ethics, the doctrine of God, and sin.