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Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Letter from MLK to Kenneth Keating

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

In this dictation by Dr. King, he expresses gratitude to the Honorable Kenneth B. Keating for his leadership in securing the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to FDR III

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the contribution of $1,000.00 made by Franklin D. Roosevelt III to the SCLC.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Richard Beal to MLK

Saturday, January 21, 1967

Mr. Beal informs Dr. King that he believes the best way for African Americans to gain the support of Caucasian Americans is for them to earn their respect.

Memorandum from William M. Gray

Friday, April 5, 1968

This memorandum from William M. Gray lists the address to which mourners should send acknowledgements following Dr. King's death.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Telegram from Paul Deitrich to John Lewis

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Paul Deitrich commends John Lewis for his speech in Washington and urges him to contact him whenever he is in Washington again. He also wants to express a much-delayed apology.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Geiser

Dr. King offers praise and support to Mrs. Geiser for her efforts to teach her children tolerance in the face of bigotry and racial hatred.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Letter from MLK to Georges Cravenne

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Cravenne for inviting him to the Palais des Sports. He also thanks Cravenne for supporting the struggle in equal human rights.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

The Pastor and His Reference Library

Here is "The Pastor and His Reference Library" by Edward C. Starr. Starr served as librarian at Bucknell. Dr. King more than likely used this resource to conduct research and organize citations while attending Crozer Theological Seminary in Upland, PA.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Letter from MLK to Mary Wood

Monday, April 18, 1960

Dr. King wrote this letter to Mrs. Mary D. Wood to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes that he appreciated her including comments on his book, "Stride Toward Freedom," and that he's glad that she found it helpful.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Stride Toward Freedom"

This statement from Victor Gollancz, Ltd. details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom",for the six-month period ending 9/29/66.

Mass Meeting on Washington Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This program outlines the structure of a mass meeting led by the SCLC at Vermont Avenue Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Among the speakers in attendance were Rev. Ralph David Abernathy and Dr. King.

Letter from Rev. Hedley W. Plunkett to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

Reverend Hedley W. Plunkett of Belfast, Northern Ireland, invites Dr. King to include the city on his schedule the next time he comes to Europe. Plunkett describes his interest in King's work and Ireland's own "Color Bar."

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Letter from MLK to Louis J. Braun

Tuesday, September 9, 1969

Dr. King agrees to serve on the Advisory Board of Campus Americans for Democratic Action. Dr. King explains that his ability to contribute to the Board will be limited, but he will assist when possible.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Celestine Fernando

Friday, May 5, 1967

Ms. McDonald grants Reverend Fernando permission to publish Dr. King's, "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from MLK to Lenn Latham

Dr. King expresses gratitude for support of his work and advises that nonviolence is the only way to achieve change.

Letter to Dora McDonald Regarding Persons Receiving Autographed Books

Thursday, June 29, 1967

Dora McDonald receives a list of names who are to receive autographed copies of Dr. King's book. The list consists of contributors to American Foundation on Nonviolence and SCLC.

Itinerary for MLK with Handwritten Notes

This itinerary from 1964 details Dr. King's traveling schedule and contains his handwritten notes with regard to discovering one's purpose in life.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Friday, February 28, 1958

In this article, "Out of the Long Night of Segregation", Dr. King discusses the result of Negroes waiting to be treated as equals to no avail. He also presents several actions that should take place to provoke change.