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Letter from Anna Gallaspy to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Anna Gallaspy, Production Director of the Immanuel United Church of Christ in Los Angeles, extends an invitation for Dr. King and members of the SCLC to review their outline of a youth festival pilot program.

Letter from Hubert Reaves to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968

Rev. Ralph Abernathy was the recipient of this letter from a prison inmate. The author also makes a request for an SCLC membership form and a picture of Dr. King, as a keepsake.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding a Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves informs Dr. King that a copy of the jacket text for "Where Do We Go from Here" is enclosed.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James Endicott

Monday, December 18, 1967

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Endicott's telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Toronto. He regretfully declines the invitation due to the volume of work with his organization.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King quotes George Hedley’s “The Symbol of the Faith.”

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Roy A. Gage Sends Support to MLK and SCLC

Friday, November 15, 1963

Roy A. Gage of Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company writes Dr. King and the SCLC Newsletter expressing his interest in the work of Dr. King and encloses $10.00

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 10, 1957

In this sermon, Dr. King states that "love is the key to the solution of the problems which we confront in the world today." Dr. King notes that this is not a simple task, but it is necessary.

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

Letter from Martha Johnson to MLK

Thursday, May 3, 1962

Martha Johnson invites Dr. King to be a member of the John Brown Memorial Association, which is dedicated to the memory of its first freedom rider.

Power for the Powerless - SCLC's Basic Challenge

This report outlines the objectives of the SCLC, as well as programs and projects led by various departments. It also includes a staff listing and organizational chart.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. to MLK

Harry Van Arsdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO, informs Dr. King, who is in the Fulton County Jail, that ten thousand unionists in New York voted to support Dr. King's fight for "decency and democracy." The organization contributes $1000 to aid Dr. King in his efforts.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row, Publishers for MLK

This document features a royalty statement from Harper & Row, Publishers, for Dr. King's "Strength to Love."

Telegram from F. M. Horton to MLK

F. M. Horton relays Norwegian ambassador True Davis' congratulations to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

Letter from L. Howard Bennett to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

L. Howard Bennett writes Dr. King and encloses statistical information regarding African American involvement in the Vietnam War.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Letter from John Sayre to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Mr. Sayre of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation thanks Dr. King for the autographed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from MLK to William A. Bennett Jr.

Tuesday, January 18, 1966

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Bennett in which Bennett suggested the phrase "dark skinned American" be used to describe African Americans. Dr. King discusses the connotations of the hateful words "deeply rooted in the debilitating racist caste ordering of our society's slavery epoch and segregation era."

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Letter From Supporter on Jobs for the Poor

The author and the addressee of this correspondence is unknown. However, the subject matter is related to the SCLC 1968 Poor Peoples Campaign. The author of this letter requested assistance in helping the poor people of Baltimore, Maryland apply for employment.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Philip S. McConnell

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. McConnell for her support of his work. He also comments on the importance of adopting nonviolence principle to resolve conflicts internationally among nations, as well as to resolve social problems at home.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King to ask him to consider donating his papers to the Atlanta University Center Library as an alternative to Boston University.