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"Oklahoma (OK)"

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Cohen

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King offers his appreciation to Leslie Cohen for communicating to him an "honor bestowed... ...by each of Miss Egnal's eighth grade class."

Miss Mahalia Jackson in Concert

Sunday, December 1, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference presents Miss Mahalia Jackson in concert, marking "another milestone in her personal dedication to the drive for complete freedom for all humanity."

Christianity

Dr. King writes about the concept of Christianity.

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

Mail and Messages Note to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

This is a list of mail and messages for Dr. King dated 12/12/67. It includes a letter from his literary agent Joan Daves about a speech to be given at the University of Kansas, a publication from the Southern Regional Council, and phone calls about speaking engagements and media inquiries.

Tillich's Definition of God

Dr. King documents philosopher Paul Tillich's definition of God from his book "Systematic Theology."

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.

Sin

Dr. King notes that I Chronicles 21:1 says that Satan ordered David to conduct a census but that another account indicates it was the Lord. He questions why it was regarded as sinful to take a census.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Telegram from Ms. Dora McDonald to A.J. Cervantes

Ms. Dora McDonald responded to a telegram sent from St. Louis Mayor A. J. Cervantes, inviting Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is." The conference, held in St. Louis, MO, was to feature civil rights leaders, mayors and other organizers. Ms. McDonald informed Mayor Cervantes that Dr. King was out of town and to look for a response from Dr. King at a later time.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Clarence E. Duffy to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Rev. Duffy expresses his religious and political concerns with Dr. King as he considers a potential presidential campaign in 1968.

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation of Disarmament and Peace, invites Dr. King to become a sponsor of the organization.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy Cotton

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King requests that Mrs. Cotton present a report on the present status and grant of CEP for an upcoming SCLC executive meeting.

Letter from E.E. Adams to MLK

E. E. Adams relates his thoughts about the constitutionality of urban renewal.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Worship

Dr. King critiques the Protestant Church worship services.

Map of Morehouse College

These maps are an overview of the buildings located at Morehouse College.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.