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Invitation to 101st Founders' Day of Morehouse College

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

In this letter, Joseph Draper, a former classmate, invites Dr. King to the 101st Founders' Day Inauguration activities at Morehouse College. Draper hopes for Dr. King's attendance, as he feels this will give support to newly instated President Gloster.

Adverse Note to MLK on Political Cartoon

This anonymous critic of Dr. King described their grievances on a political cartoon from The Birmingham News that referred to Dr. King as a hypocrite.

Letter from MLK to Alvin Jackson

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dr. King advises Alvin Jackson to contact the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to obtain assistance.

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

Telegram from B. Hicks to Herbert Coulton

Tuesday, August 3, 1965

B. Hicks telegrams Herbert Coulton stating that he will pay for his transportation and expenses during his visit.

Letter to MLK from Paul Kennedy

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Paul Kennedy writes Dr. King to state that since Robert Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency, he believes hat an appreciative, token march on Washington would be more effective than a force march this year.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Temple Sholom Concert Forum Committee Announces MLK as Guest Lecturer

Chicago's Temple Sholom encourages interested parties to reserve their tickets soon, given the widespread enthusiasm for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement.

Letter from MLK to Mary Wood

Monday, April 18, 1960

Dr. King wrote this letter to Mrs. Mary D. Wood to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes that he appreciated her including comments on his book, "Stride Toward Freedom," and that he's glad that she found it helpful.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

Letter from Ann B. Houston to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

In this letter Ann B. Houston of the American Friends Service Committee offers her gratitude for a contribution received from the Benevolence Club of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She further states that the funds have gone to good use in South Vietnam towards the manufacture of artificial limbs using local immigrated labor.

Schleiermacher (Relation of Morality to Religion)

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on the relation of morality to religion.

Telegram from Truman Douglass to MLK about Pending Letter

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

This telegram was sent to Dr. King from Truman D. Douglass regarding an upcoming telegram pertaining to nine conditions set forth in an earlier letter. Douglass is the Chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Monday, May 15, 1967

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Response from MLK to Priscilla C. Spagne

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Priscilla C. Spagne for her supportive letter to the Boston Globe. He proclaims that it is important to, "Take every opportunity to make our consciences known to the public."

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Dr. King's Revealing Report On 'Summer of Discontent'

Dr. King's responses to the events in Birmingham, Alabama during the summer of 1963 are reported in this Chicago Sun-Times article.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

Telegram from Konrad Bloch to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Konrad Bloch congratulates Dr. King and says he will see him in Stockholm.

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Letter from Patterson Charles Jr. to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Patterson Charles, Jr. writes Dora McDonald asking for Dr. King's help regarding alleged racial discrimination in a legal matter.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Adventures of Ideas."

Anaximander

Dr. King documents background information on Greek philosopher Anaximander. Over five note cards, he outlines key principles of Anaximander's philosophy under the subject titles "Metaphysics" and "His Views on Biology."

Summit Conference Program

Sunday, December 15, 1963

This program outlines the schedule and issues of concern to be addressed at the Summit Conference.

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.