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Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

History

Dr. King cites Reinhold Niebuhr's definition of history and its relation to God.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Discrimination Act by a Licensee of the Illinois Department of Registration and Education

Saturday, April 16, 1966

The following is a complaint about an act of discrimination sent to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education from Mrs. McLouis Robinet and William Moyer.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Iwanabe

In this draft letter to Mr. Iwanabe, Dr. King explains his methods, understanding and goals pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Save the Children of Mississippi Resolutions

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Barbara Greene issues a memo for the Ad Hoc Committee to Save the Children of Mississippi that includes resolutions to protest federal funding cutbacks of Head Start programs in Mississippi and interpretation of the Green Amendment regarding maximizing participation in such programs by the poor. She attaches a copy of a telegram sent to Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Birthday Card from Margarite Foley

This birthday, wishing the recipient "increasing joy," was sent by Margarite Foley.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

Monday, November 22, 1965

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Newsletter from The Knights of the Confederacy

The Knights of the Confederacy, a student organization that promoted segregation in public schools, used this flyer to recruit students who were aligned with their goal of protecting "white rights."

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Tom Cochran, President of the Young Democrats at the University of Georgia School of Law writes to invite Dr. King to speak as a lecturer. According to Mr. Cochran, the political climate in the state of Georgia has increased the urgency for Dr. King to speak at the institution.

Letter from MLK to SNCC's John Lewis Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Dr. King extends gratitude to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, for his encouraging letter upon the announcement of Dr. King being chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King states he does not accept this award as a tribute to himself, but as a tribute to the entire Civil Rights Movement. Lewis was regarded as a key SNCC leader and became the US Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district in 1987.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK concerning VISTA volunteer training

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

Maurice A. Dawkins, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, requests leadership training from the SCLC for the VISTA volunteers who were expected to work in the rural South.

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Danny Cupit to MLK

In this letter, Danny Cupit writes to Dr. King and expresses his joy in reading one of Dr. King's books. He also acknowledges the pleasure of meeting Dr. and Mrs. King after a speech, given by Senator Kennedy.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

Telegram to Dr. Benjamin Spock from MLK

Monday, May 29, 1967

In May 1967 Dr. King sends a telegram to Dr. Spock (an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the biggest best-sellers of all time) while he is in Geneva to praise him on taking a stance on controversial issues.

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

Thursday, December 13, 1962

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Letter from L. E. Stahl to SCLC

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Ruth Stahl encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC for their commitment to improving the issues of the world. Mrs. Stahl intended to join the NAACP but decided to contribute to progressive organizations instead.