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Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962
Montgomery, AL

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter from Harold Weisberg to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD), New Orleans, LA, CUBA

Harold Weisberg discusses the Kennedy assassination and writes to ask Dr. King if he could meet with him and discuss what he has learned about the issue.

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Telegram from SCLC to NAACP Convention

Tuesday, July 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference welcomes Roy Wilkins to Atlanta. They also express their hope that the laborers of the NAACP convenetion will help bring about equality.

Letter from George Richard to MLK

North Carolina (NC)

George Richard asks Dr. King for books on demonstrations, and he also asks Dr. King to visit his town.

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from MLK to Joan Daves

Saturday, August 29, 1964
New York, NY

In this response letter, Dr. King encloses a revised copy of a manuscript from an article of which the reverend planned to make additional changes to.

Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
New York, NY

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Progress

Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

Letter from Leon Hall to William Rutherford

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Leon Hall writes William Rutherford requesting additional per diem fees for SCLC's Mississippi field staff.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Letter from the Unitarian Church of Germantown to MLK

Friday, February 23, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests Dr. King's presence during the Pulpit Schedule for 1962-1963. The organization is aware of Dr. King's endless schedule and provides him with a honorarium if he were to accept this invitation.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962
California (CA)

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
Chicago, IL

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

Letter From Jim Letherer Regarding Proposed March

Thursday, November 23, 1967

In this letter Letherer suggests a March on Christmas Eve or Easter Sunday while expressing his continued support and participation in S.N.C.C.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC), INDIA, London, England

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Invitation from the Ambassador of Ethiopia to MLK

ETHIOPIA

The Ambassador of Ethiopia extends an invitation for Dr. King to attend a reception honoring Haile Selassie I, the Emperor of Ethiopia.

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Monday, May 27, 1963
Chattanooga, TN

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

Poster: This Store Is Against Equal Opportunities for Negroes

Texas (TX)

The SCLC placed this type of boycott poster on the storefronts of businesses that refused to provide equal job opportunities to Negroes.

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.

Statement from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding the Progress of Urban Renewal and Redevelopment

Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Walter E. Fauntroy, chairman of the Housing and Urban Renewal Committee of the Interdenominational Ministers' Alliance, makes a statement regarding the progress of urban renewal and redevelopment in Washington, D.C. He discusses five steps for a unified approach to meeting the communities housing problems. Two notable steps include full and effective citizen's participation in all community plans, and adequate and humane solutions in rehousing all families.