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MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965
South Africa, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, SPAIN, PORTUGAL, ANGOLA, MOZAMBIQUE, New York, NY, New York (NY), CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, GERMANY, JAPAN

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Letter from a Soldier to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

In one of a series of letters to Dr. King, "Private Friend" seeks further advice from Dr. King on how to combat the discrimination he faces in the Army. Friend's response to Dr. King from an earlier correspondence provides detailed information regarding the sentencing structure of the unfair charges against him.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
San Francisco, CA

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Tuesday, January 15, 1963
PERU, FRANCE

Mrs. King sends birthday wishes to Dr. King.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968
New York (NY), INDIA, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C.

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

ISRAEL

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

Funny Story for MLK

Thursday, July 12, 1962
Alabama (AL), Tuskegee, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN)

The writer (signature illegible) gives his moral support for Dr. King during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia. He relates an anecdote of his own experiences that ends with a heartfelt, and humorous, punchline.

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Thursday, February 2, 1967
New York, NY, Selma, AL, Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968
Georgia (GA)

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Roselyn Silverman to Dora McDonald

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Minnesota (MN)

Roselyn Silverman sends Dora McDonald a letter, with enclosed memorandum, in regards to a tentative itinerary for Dr. King's upcoming lecture.

Letter From T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Saturday, December 24, 1966
New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

T. K. Mahadevan, a representative of the Gandhi Peace Foundation, writes Dr. King regarding an upcoming visit to the United States. Some primary interests during his visit includes meeting key Negro leaders, spending time with an average Negro family, and perhaps a few speaking engagements.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

Friday, March 31, 1967
Detroit, MI, CHINA, VIETNAM, CUBA, JAPAN

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

Letter from William Mallory to MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mr. Mallory writes to Dr. King proposing a national day to be observed by all Negroes. The three purposes of this day are to instill racial pride, demonstrate the contributions of Negroes and to preserve the heritage of American Negroes.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Letter from Ted Mercer Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Tennessee (TN), Chattanooga, TN

Mr. Mercer requests materials to promote Dr. King's candidacy in the "Choice '68" mock election program on the Bryan College campus. He also relays an invitation from the student body vice president asking Dr. King to speak on campus.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Roebuck

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King informs Mr. Roebuck that he has misplaced Mr. Roebuck's check intended for the "Freedom Movement," and thanks him for his support while requesting a replacement check.

Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Tuskegee, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

SCLC Meeting Agenda

Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King notes agenda items to cover with the SCLC staff, including improving organization within the SCLC, finances and upcoming programs.

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.