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Sin

Dr. King paraphrases a scripture from the book of Leviticus that pertains to sin.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Newspaper Article "Negro Nation Ratified"

This article discusses a group of black nationalists who ratified a declaration of independence for a separate Negro nation. The new nation was named the "Republic of New Africa."

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Eisenhower Campbell to MLK

Thursday, September 3, 1964

The Methodist Youth Fellowship of Philadelphia extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Rally in early 1965. The officers of the fellowship also request the address of Reverends Walter Fauntroy and Wyatt Walker of SCLC.

Presidential Invitation to White House Luncheon

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

President Kennedy invites Dr. King to attend a White House Luncheon on the occasion of the visit of Archbishop Makarios, the President of the Republic of Cyprus.

Letter from Steve Delaney to William P. Lampkin

Monday, August 9, 1965

Steve Delaney, Assistant New Director for WSOC, writes William Lampkin regarding Dr. King's visit to Montreat, North Carolina. Delaney thanks Lampkin for providing updates about the visit and also asks for additional information about Dr. King's planned speech.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

Letter from George W. Haley to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this letter George W. Haley extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a public meeting. He also comments on a speech that Dr. King gave in Kansas.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

1963 World Day of Prayer

Friday, March 5, 1965

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

Letter from Michelle Feinberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Michelle Feinberg, a student in a special education class, writes Dr. King a letter about what she has been learning. She also asks Dr. King to send her a letter and a picture for their school.

SCLC Newsletter: Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany

In this newsletter, SCLC announces integration in Albany, GA and believes that the city will soon face the legal death of segregation. They also inform readers of the arrest of SCLC Petersburg President, David Gunter.

Social Justice in Modern Society

In the following document, Dr. King comments on the "social stagnation" of the world, despite impressive advances in science and technology. He believes that without moral character and social justice, civilization will self-destruct.

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

These images are part of a pamphlet that provides an intimate look into SCLC's activities.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Letter from Seabury Press to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967

Alda Lee Boyd, publicity director for the Seabury Press, asks Dr. King if he would write a statement that can be used to promote "The Jon Daniels Story." The book is about an Episcopal seminary student, Jonathan Daniels, who was killed while working in Mississippi following the Selma to Montgomery March.

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Letter from Richard Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Richard Bennett requests a letter of greeting from Dr. King to be read at the Minnesota Federation of Teachers Educational Conference.