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Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

Sunday, March 8, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Resource Teachers

This document lists the eight duties of Resource Teachers, and includes targeted instruction for how this group should interact with base teachers and students.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, South Africa, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Letter from a Supporter of MLK

An anonymous person pleads with Dr. King to not accept a rumored government job that was offered to him, in exchange of his plans to alleviate poverty.

Antidotes For Fear

MEXICO, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Letter From Irving Neiman to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
Connecticut (CT), GERMANY

Irving Neiman offers his legal services to the SCLC for their work in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Arthur Abba Goldberg to Dr. King about Conducting Seminars for SCLC

Friday, January 12, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

Arthur Abba Goldberg, Deputy Attorney General for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and the Housing Finance Agency is sending a copy of his resume to Dr. King, and expresses his interest in conducting seminars in the field of housing or housing finance.

Racism in the United States

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Albany, GA

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Telegram from Donna Jean Stancliff to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Norfolk, VA, Atlanta, GA

Donna Jean Stancliff informs Dr. King of Mrs. Zelma G. Proctor's funeral.

Letter from MLK to Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
INDIA

Dr. King writes Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya in response to a letter that requested prayer for their first born child, Chiraashree. Dr. King expresses his appreciation for their sentiments regarding his work and informs Bhattacharya that their child will forever be in his prayers.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, VIETNAM, California (CA), Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Letter From Emma Kramer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 28, 1965
Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI)

Emma Kramer writes Dora McDonald concerning a cancelled contract for Dr. King. Kramer emphasizes how imperative it is for a letter to be written on Dr. King's behalf providing an explanation as to why he is unable to fulfill his commitment.

Letter from Judy Grey to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Judy Grey, a student at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, informs Dr. King of a paper she is required to complete regarding an issue in the South and requests that he provide any information concerning the movement in the South.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Dallas, TX

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from MLK to Claudine Shannon

Wednesday, December 29, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King expresses his regrets that he cannot officiate Claudine Shannon's wedding.

Telegram from Milton Powell to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA

Upon Dr. King's recent arrest, Milton Powell, the executive chairman of CORE, sends his whole-hearted support on behalf of the organization.

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Ball

Washington, D.C.

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the Inaugural Ball following the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

Emergency Rally--Walk with Dr. Spock for Peace in Vietnam

New York (NY), VIETNAM

The following document is promoting a rally for peace in Vietnam. Dr. Benjamin Spock, among others, is scheduled to speak at the rally.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

Virginia (VA), Nashville, TN

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967
Chicago, IL

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Telegram from Ms. Dora McDonald to A.J. Cervantes

Missouri (MO)

Ms. Dora McDonald responded to a telegram sent from St. Louis Mayor A. J. Cervantes, inviting Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is." The conference, held in St. Louis, MO, was to feature civil rights leaders, mayors and other organizers. Ms. McDonald informed Mayor Cervantes that Dr. King was out of town and to look for a response from Dr. King at a later time.

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

New York, NY, New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Wisconsin (WI), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.