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"Oklahoma (OK)"

Ritschl and Schleiermacher on Method

Dr. King sketches his view of methodologies employed by German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from MLK to the Fourth Grade Class of Germantown Friends School

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks Kendall Bryant and the fourth grade class of the Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia for their letter and contribution following the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Dr. King also mentions the need for all races and ethnicities to work together to achieve the "Brotherhood of Man."

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Assuming Presidency

Monday, December 2, 1963

President Johnson writes Dr. King thanking him for his sympathetic telegram as he assumes the Presidency and assures him that he will continue the fight for civil rights initiated by President Kennedy.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Nina C. Brown

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dora McDonald provides Nina C. Brown with details about Dr. King's upcoming appearance at Pennsylvania State University.

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Shaefer that Dr. King will be able to speak in Kennett Square in Pennsylvania.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Dorothy I. Height to MLK

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dorothy Height invites Dr. King to the 32nd National Convention of the National Council of Negro Women. Height serves as the national president of the NCNW.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Birthday Card from Leola Whitted to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Leola Whitted, a member of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Nite of Civil Rights

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This program details events that occurred for a "Nite of Civil Rights."

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

Power of Attorney

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

This document appoints Chauncey Eskridge as agent and attorney for Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr. in Philadelphia.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Mr. Hillyer and his children Nitra, Linda, and Jonathan send a donation of thirty-five dollars to Dr. King, in memory of the late Mrs. Hillyer.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Ella

Wednesday, July 22, 1959

Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker provides his appraisal regarding an earlier proposal by Spelman College to create an Institute on Nonviolence. Walker addresses the letter to Ella describing several categories of interest pertaining to the organization of this event.

Letter from Randolph Blackwell to Greene, Ayers, Swigert & Cluster

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell responds to the gentlemen of Greene, Ayers, Swiger & Cluster concerning a previous issue.