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Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Thursday, July 20, 1967
Texas (TX), VIETNAM

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Letter from M. Steven Lubet to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967
Illinois (IL)

M. Steven Lubet is requesting the presence of Mr. and Mrs. King at the Vietnam teach-in. The teach-in is being sponsored by the Northwestern chapter of Students for a Democratic Society and its purpose is to increase people's understanding of the events occuring in Vietnam.

Those Attending Breakfast with MLK

New York (NY)

List of attendees for a breakfast meeting at Cornell University in Ithaca (NY) when Dr. King was on campus to deliver his sermon, "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

California (CA), VIETNAM

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

On Using Christian Words

Dr. King references Henry Nelson Wieman's book "On Using Christian Words."

Evil (The Problem of)

Dr. King records thoughts on the problem of evil with references to the British philosopher John Stuart Mill and Job.

The Free Southern Theater

New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA)

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Letter from Mary L. Bryant to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Mary L. Bryant writes Dr. King seeking help. She is a mother of eight and in desperate need of used clothes for her children. Her appeal comes as a result of financial hardship due to covering the medical expenses of a child with a serious illness.

Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood

Monday, April 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA

This is the itinerary for the Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood to Dr. King's funeral site. A group of bereaved citizens from Northeast Atlanta organized this walk to express human solidarity.

Letter from Tom Edward Ross to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL

Tom Edward Ross informs Dr. King of a piece of artwork he created of Dr. King. An effort to publish the piece in the Houston Chronicle was unsuccessful. Ross seeks Dr. King's assistance in promoting the sale of the piece.

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.

Telegram from Truman Douglass to MLK about Pending Letter

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

This telegram was sent to Dr. King from Truman D. Douglass regarding an upcoming telegram pertaining to nine conditions set forth in an earlier letter. Douglass is the Chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Pittsburgh, PA

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Friday, August 12, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Letter to Dr. King from Elder G.W. Watkins

Friday, August 2, 1957
Texas (TX)

Elder G. W. Watkins writes Dr. King requesting that he and his organization join the fight to regain Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) title as the Heavy Weight Boxing Champion of the World.

Letter from MLK to Paralee Fields

Friday, November 13, 1964
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King writes Paralee Fields to decline an invitation to speak at the commencement for Phenix High School. Dr. King explains that he is very busy with the Civil Rights Movement and has limited time for speaking engagements.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Letter from Sheldon C. Singer to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968
Memphis, TN

The Executive Vice President of Ring Radio informs Dr. King of attacks made by callers to the station's "Openline" program. He also invites Dr. King to respond to the attacks.

Letter to MLK from Rev. L.C. Coleman

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Rev. Coleman, of Marks, Mississippi addresses Dr. King, as the recipient of this correspondence. This letter asks for Dr. King to visit the town of Marks and participate in a Citizenship Class. It, also, notes that Rev. Coleman is running for a town elected position, known as "Road Supervisor."

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956
Montgomery, AL, CHINA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, JAPAN

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Nature

Dr. King quotes Aristotle's "Physics, Book II" and notes Spinoza's view of nature.