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"Orangeburg, SC"

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
New York, NY

Adlai Stevenson, the United States Representative to the United Nations, invites Dr. King to attend an upcoming meeting "to discuss current developments" in policy decisions on Africa.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Letter from Rev. Jesse Jackson to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Chicago, IL

In an effort to make Operation Breadbasket successful ,the SCLC held seminars to help the negro businessmen develop their businesses. Jackson invites Dr. King and anyone else he wants to bring as an informal resource during the seminar.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, NETHERLANDS

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy's Statement Following MLK's Assasination

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Abernathy acknowledges the deep pain and anger those in SCLC feel at the senseless taking of Dr. King’s life. They pledge that his work and commitment to nonviolence will continue. They are as much against violence, says Abernathy, as they are against racial and economic injustice. He announces that Mrs. King will join him in leading a march in Memphis in support of the sanitation workers and that the Poor People’s Campaign will proceed. He calls upon Congress to respond to the major loss represented by Dr.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960
Louisville, KY, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL)

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Wednesday, March 13, 1968
Hatfield, Mark O., Malik, Charles Habib, Lincoln, Abraham, MacArthur, Douglas, 1880-1964., Minnesota (MN), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, South Africa, EGYPT, SYRIA, IRAQ, ISRAEL, JORDAN, CUBA, CHINA, Alabama (AL), INDONESIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, PORTUGAL, JAPAN

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

Letter from MLK to Clifford Joesph

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
New York, NY

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mr. Joseph for donating Christmas cards to the SCLC.

Letter from Eugenia C. Gambaccini to Russian Delegate

Eugenia Gambaccini impresses his hope that Russia "will realize the justice and love that God as for man, especially for those who have a good will."

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), CANADA

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Thursday, February 3, 1064
Washington, D.C.

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Telegram from Bob Dillon to MLK

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Alabama (AL)

In this telegram, Bob Dillon requests Dr. King's presence along with Reverend Billy Graham at a revival being held in what he classifies as an "unchristian community" in Birmingham.

Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1962
New York (NY)

The author in this letter writes Dr. King to describe the racial discrimination he faces in the Army. He writes that about mistreatment he has received from his sergeants as well as the court martial he faces for missing a bed check, but he is afraid to say much more because he is not certain that Dr. King will receive the letter.

Invitation to MLK from Washington North Idaho Conference of the United Church of Christ

Monday, November 8, 1965
Washington (WA), Idaho (ID), Chicago, IL

Archie Hook invites Dr. King to be the guest preacher at the Annual Meeting of the Washington North Idaho Conference of the United Church of Christ.

Telegram from Nicolas Nabokov to MLK

Friday, May 29, 1964
Montgomery, AL, ITALY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

The mayor of Florence, Italy telegrams Dr. King with hopes that he will accept an invitation to speak at the Mediterranean Colloquium Florence on racial issues occurring in the United States.

Letter from Ed Clayton to Martin Gal

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL

Ed Clayton, Public Relations Director for SCLC, writes Martin Gal, Producer of WMSB TV, to inform him that Dr. King will not be able to make an appearance on his television production because of his focus on the Civil Rights Movement.

People In Action Column: "Can We Ever Repay Them"

Saturday, June 9, 1962
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, New Orleans, LA

This column by Dr. King in the New York Amsterdam News highlights Dr. C.O. Simpkins, leader of the United Christian Movement. Following cross burnings on his front lawn, death threats, and other harassment, both his home and summer house were bombed. The arsonists returned again the next day to ensure the complete destruction of both buildings.

Telegram from Malcolm X to MLK

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY)

Malcolm X offers Dr. King assistance with the situation in St. Augustine, including the organization of self-defense units.

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Tuesday, June 23, 1964
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.

Greatness

Dr. King quotes Ernest Fremont Tittle's "The Lord's Prayer," in which Tittle explains how Jesus measured greatness.

Letter from Huub A. J. Coppens to MLK

Friday, September 18, 1964
NETHERLANDS, Atlanta, GA

Huub, A. J. Coppens, Foreign Secretary of the "De Tribune," reminds Dr. King that they are waiting for a response to their invitation.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Montgomery, AL, Kentucky (KY)

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK with Concerns of Supporting SCLC

Saturday, December 10, 1966
California (CA), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC)

Sandperl pleas with Dr. King to review and respond to his four point proposal, proclaiming that only then will he and Joan Baez continue to support SCLC. Sandperl criticizes SCLC for not being honest with it's coworkers, being unorganized, and self defeating. Sandperl wants Dr. King to convince him otherwise, but does not view the SCLC as being able to achieve social change from what he experienced at the retreat in South Carolina. Sandperl promises support if his proposal is adopted by the SCLC.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."