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"Orangeburg, SC"

Brutality in Mississippi

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

Letter from Lucille D. Anderson to MLK inviting him to Philadelphia

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King's presence is requested by Lucille Anderson in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Robert A. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, November 17, 1964

Robert A. Jackson, Minister for Knox's Church, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the many honors bestowed upon him. Minister Jackson invites Dr. King to come speak at either the Polio Dinner or the 100th Anniversary of the Church Home.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Adventures of Ideas."

Letter from Helen Paul to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Helen Paul of Follett Publishing thanks Ms. McDonald for informing Dr. King of her request to publish several of his speeches.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966

Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Telegram from MLK and Joseph Lowery to William Anderson

Joseph E. Lowery and Dr. King addressed this telegram to William Anderson asking him to attend a SCLC board meeting regarding the Poor People's Campaign.

History

Dr. King reflects on history as it pertains to human society.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church Third Annual Lecture Series

Friday, November 10, 1961

The Mount Zion Baptist Church presents Dr. King as the key note speaker for their Third Annual Lecture Series. The lecture series will provide the community with a conscientious perspective of the societal issues as recognized by Dr. King. Furthermore, this event will bring aid to the Building Program of Mount Zion.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Letter from Stanley Slota to MLK

Stanley Slota writes Dr. King to acknowledge how proud he is of him and expresses his desire for more people to give back to the poor.

Rev. P.A. Berry Invites MLK to England

Friday, June 9, 1967

Rev. Quinland R. Gordon informs Dr. King of a recent letter sent to him by Rev. P. A. Berry. Father Berry is interested in securing Dr. King as a guest speaker at his Cathedral in England on Sunday November 12, 1967.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK's Stance on Vietnam

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

This anonymous letter writer feels that Dr. King's active stance against the Vietnam war takes away from his fight for civil rights. He includes a newspaper article that encapsulates Dr. King's views on the subject, and lists the reasons he feels that Dr. King is being unpatriotic.

Notecard Regarding Capitalism

This notecard quotes Walter Rauschenbusch's thoughts on capitalism.

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

Memo from Harry Boyte to MLK

Mr. Boyte asks Dr. King to review the document "ACTION FOR DEMOCRACY." He also attaches two tables for his review.

Catholic Interracial Council's JFK Awards Dinner Honoring MLK Brochure

Thursday, October 29, 1964

This brochure outlines the Catholic Interracial Council's (CIC) John F. Kennedy Awards Dinner honoring Dr. King, to be held on October 29, 1968. In addition to describing the mission of the dinner, the brochure adds a description of the CIC and a biography of Dr. King. Also included is an article and photo from Dr. King's visit with Pope Paul VI.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Saul Sherman

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Sherman for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

Periods of Greek Literature

Dr. King provides brief notes on three periods of Greek literature.

How My Theology Has Changed

Dr. King highlights seven main ways in which his theological views have changed since his final year at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter of Invitation from Elroy C. Sandquist Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, July 19, 1966

In this letter, Mr. Sandquist writes to invite Dr. King to make an address at a luncheon for the City Club of Chicago.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Werner Schatz

Tuesday, September 22, 1964

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Werner Schatz who has invited Dr. King to speak in Basel, Switzlerland. McDonald states that Dr. King received the letter upon arriving from abroad causing him to miss the date of the invitation.

Hosea

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Hosea and his views of God.

Letter from Dr. Eliot Stadler to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964

Dr. Stadler writes Dr. King regarding his inability to join him in his campaign for the "rights of man." He expresses his regret with an enclosure of a financial contribution.

Walk for Freedom

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Letter from Juniata College to MLK

Thursday, June 4, 1964

Robert E. Faus of Juniata College address Dora McDonald concerning the possibility of securing Dr. King for their religious convocation. Mr. Faus inquires about the status of Dr. King's schedule for the school year.

Letter from Tim Bowden to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1968

Tim Bowden requests an interview with Dr. King for the Australian Broadcasting Commission.