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Telegram to W. L. James from Dr. and Ms. King

Monday, January 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King write Mrs. James expressing condolences following the death of her husband. Dr. James was a music educator at Spelman College and a 1923 graduate of Morehouse College . He served as Chairman of the Music Department at Spelman and Director of the Glee Club from 1933 to 1966. Dr. James died December 27, 1966.

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.

Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

Draft of the Position Paper on Community Re-Creation

Saturday, April 1, 1967

This document drafts a set of intentions aimed at improving communities in America and uplifting individuals out of poverty. Proposed fundamental goals of achieving this include, a secure and adequate income, a proportionate share of decision making power, and access to the full range of human services.

Letter from Joseph W. Harb to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967

Joseph W. Harb requests a copy of Dr. King's speech concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter to MLK from Carl Fuqua

Friday, February 1, 1963

Rev. Carl Fuqua writes a letter to Dr. King expressing regret that he could not attend the NAACP meeting due to a sudden virus.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James Endicott

Monday, December 18, 1967

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Endicott's telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Toronto. He regretfully declines the invitation due to the volume of work with his organization.

Letter from Mildred Scott Olmsted to MLK

Friday, June 19, 1964

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom would like Dr. King to send his greetings for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Philosophy Defined

Dr. King documents statements regarding the function of philosophy.

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Letter from MLK to Ada B. H. Murray

Monday, January 14, 1963

Dr. King writes Mrs. Ada Murray to send her holiday greetings and to express his sorrows in hearing about two of her bad experiences. He also discusses his future commitment to visit California.

Certainty (Religious)

Dr. King refers to Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" in regard to religious certainty.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Maurice DeCuir to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this letter, Maurice De Cuir expresses his concern, in regard to race relations, as it pertains to government jobs in helping the economic status of the negro. He then informs Dr. King of the intent, of the Equal Opportunity Commission, to investigate the matter.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, July 13, 1962

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.

Letter from Robert A. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, November 17, 1964

Robert A. Jackson, Minister for Knox's Church, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the many honors bestowed upon him. Minister Jackson invites Dr. King to come speak at either the Polio Dinner or the 100th Anniversary of the Church Home.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.