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Morality

Dr. King documents a quote from British statesman John Morley regarding the morality of war. Dr. King refers to the quote, taken from Morley's publication "Recollection," as a "grand, potent monosyllable." Following the citation, Dr. King comments, "This is an agnostic talking."

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Wednesday, March 14, 1962

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Thursday, November 21, 1963

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet describes the SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The SCLC provides information on the purpose of the school, first class citizen preparation and the characteristics of an ideal candidate for training.

Letter from Frederick G. Dutton to MLK Regarding the Oral History Project

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Frederick G. Dutton, by request of Robert Kennedy, contacts Dr. King to discuss the Oral History Project for the John F. Kennedy Library. Mr. Dutton informs Dr. King that Berl Bernhard will be communicating with him to arrange a proper interview time.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Letter to Mrs. King from Rev. and Mrs. Joseph L. Roberts

Thursday, April 11, 1968

In this heartfelt correspondence to Mrs. King, Rev. Joseph Roberts, President Elder of the West Detroit District for the AME Church, expressed sympathy for the death of Dr. King. In the letter, he acknowledges the enclosure of the hard copy of his spoken tribute to Dr. King. Seven years later, in 1975, Rev. Roberts would succeed Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., as the fourth pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Albany Movement Support Letter from MLK to Rev. Hugh Wire

Thursday, October 11, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Reverend Wire for his participation in the Albany Movement.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

Sunday, August 25, 1963

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. Letter to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. is an organization dedicated to educating the youth through their distribution of scholarships. Wilson W. Woodbeck informs Dr. King that the organization will be honored to have him as an honorary member as they are entering into the third annual scholarship concert.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

SCLC News Release: The State of Negro Education in the South

This SCLC news release discusses the terrible educational conditions endured by African American students in the South. It also highlights effective solutions to exposing "negro youngsters" to better teachers and a better quality of learning.

Letter from MLK to Brown Brothers Harriman and Company about a Contribution

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to the Brown Brothers Harriman and Company for an anonymous contribution of company stock they forwarded. Dr. King also comments on why such contributions are needed.

Letter from Leonard Spacek to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Leonard Spacek of Arthur Andersen & Co. thanks Dr. King for recent comments about open housing in Chicago.

Right & Wrong

Dr. King quotes James Martineau’s “Types of Ethical Theory, Volume II.”

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Statements of Wisdom"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing boxes in reference to a statement of Wisdom by Charles G. Finney.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.