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Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Des Moines, IA, Nebraska (NE), Cleveland, OH, Mississippi (MS)

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce of Time Magazine

Thursday, January 16, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Henry Luce of Time magazine for naming him "Man of the Year." However, Dr. King believes that this honor is shared among the millions of individuals who committed themselves to the struggle for civil rights. Dr. King also acknowledges Luce for publishing the accomplishments of Negro professionals.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James C. Gray

Monday, November 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Dr. James Gray for his generous contribution to the SCLC and states, "Without your dollars for freedom, the Conference would be unable to work effectively."

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Letter from Thomas Scroth to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King receives an invitation to the Forum Committee dinner in Washington, DC. This correspondence provides details of the format and location of the event.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA)

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Urban Training for Christian Mission Board of Directors Meeting

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Chicago, IL

This agenda report lists activities for the Urban Training Center's Board of Directors meeting held on June 1, 1967.

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967
Oregon (OR)

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Linda Houser

Monday, October 21, 1963
Delaware (DE), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King writes this letter to Linda Houser of Ursulin Academy regarding the studies that cultivated her involvement in the "struggle for social justice in America."

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Colorado (CO)

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

We Salute You!

Atlanta, GA

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

News Clipping Pertaining to Job Corp March

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Michigan (MI)

The article references a series of hostile altercations between the trainees at a local Job Corps and the residents of Battle Creek.

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966
Tuskegee, AL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Telegram to Charles Wherry from Frances Lucas

Saturday, November 23, 1968
California (CA)

Frances Lucas writes to Mr. Wherry in Mrs. King's stead thanking him for his kindness and congratulating him on a film project. He also conveys appreciation from Mrs. King for the memorial of her husband at California State College.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter from Glenn E. Smiley to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Smiley requests an endorsement from Dr. King on the creation of a non-violent training film by The Fellowship of Reconciliation.

1964 Election

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

Letter from John F. Steinman to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

John F. Steinman commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership and encloses a check for the SCLC and SCLF.

Telegram from Selma Frazier to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Selma Frazier and family send their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964
JAPAN

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Letter from Local 89 Members to Martin Luther King, Jr.

New York, NY

In this letter dated March 5, 1968, the Anti-Discrimination and Civil Rights Committee of Local 89 invites King to speak at their membership meeting on April 1, 1968. Albert Jenkins, Emil Ramirez, and Wendell are the members of Local 89 who sent this letter.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Rev. George W. Gunn

Friday, August 6, 1965
Arkansas (AR), Georgia (GA)

Reverend Andrew Young informs Reverend George Gunn of the Presbyterian University Center that he will not be in attendance at the Campus Ministry Association meeting due to an emergency situation in Americus, Georgia that requires his special attention.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Samuel Evans

Wednesday, September 23, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald writes to Samuel L. Evans, of Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee, on behalf of Rev. Andrew Young regarding Dr. King's appearance in Philadelphia.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), North Carolina (NC), Florida (FL)

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."