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Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Letter from Charles V. Arthur to MLK

Tuesday, July 9, 1963

Charles V. Arthur of Vancouver's Kitsilano Secondary School encloses a contribution for the SCLC. He explains that the staff wishes to show appreciation for the efforts of the SCLC.

Letter from S.Leiss to MLK Regarding Dutch Publication Rights

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

S. Leiss sent Dr King this satement regarding a payment for the Dutch rights to "Why We Can't Wait".

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

Letter from the Lamar W. Sessoms Family to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967

In this letter, the Sessoms family informs Dr. King that rural sections of Mississippi are systematically starving their Negro residents. The Sessoms family asks for Dr. King's advice and assistance in alleviating this problem.

Telegram from MLK to Jesse Hill

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Dr. King sends condolences to Jesse Hill regarding the loss of his grandmother.

Telegram from the Students Union of Aarus University to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964

The Students Union of Aarus University congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Letter from MLK to Richard Bennett

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Dr. King graciously declines Mr. Bennett's invitation to speak in St. Paul under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Federation of Teachers. Dr. King will be traveling to Israel and Africa during this time.

Flyer for SCLC Mass Meeting

This flyer advertises a 1958 Norfolk, VA SCLC mass meeting.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

Friday, October 1, 1954

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse

This pamphlet is from Dr. King's undergraduate alma mater, Morehouse College. The President of the institute, Benjamin E. Mays, is the author of , "A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse" which outlines the progress made during his presidency.

Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Letter from Floyd Henderson to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Floyd B. Henderson informs Dr. King that he supports African Americans as a whole. He proceeds to ask him to help elect Richard Nixon for President.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

Program from The Poor People's Campaign Committee for Nassau County

Dr. King delivers an address for the Poor People's Campaign Committee of Nassau County.

God

Dr. King discusses the inevitability of God being an object. Dr. King quotes a theologian's perception that God's ability to be an object would cease his capacity to be one being among others.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Letter from Elmer Jordan Admonishing MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

In this letter dated February 12, 1968, Elmer Jordan writes, "your ideas will cause your death because of your heart" as he advises Dr. King to refrain from his "threatening proposals.".

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

God

Dr. King cites and comments on a passage from I Chronicles about the gods that are idols.

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

Letter to Reverend Ralph Abernathy from Eleanore Wallace

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Mrs. Wallace writes to Rev. Abernathy in admiration of how he has carried on the work of Dr. King and wants to know how she can further contribute to the SCLC.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Telegram from Unius Griffin to MLK

Unius Griffin writes to Dr. King regarding four Negro political candidates seeking elective offices in Wilcox County, Alabama. Griffin includes information on the increasing numbers of registered Negro voters and speaks to the various intents of each Negro candidate.