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Letter from Gerhard Ruoff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Gerhard Ruoff inquires about Dr. King and his nonviolent philosophy. Ruoff desires to know how King will respond if violence faces him.

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. C.A. Echols

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to Rev. C.A. Echols on behalf of Dr. King. She encloses a statement from Dr. King which was pubished in the "Massachusetts Review" for Echol's graduate studies.

Telegram from George Field to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

In this telegram, George Field, Executive Director of Freedom House, was willing to set a new date for their civil rights dinner, so that Dr. King would be able to attend.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Iwanabe

In this draft letter to Mr. Iwanabe, Dr. King explains his methods, understanding and goals pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Rubio

In this letter, Dr. King attempts to guide Dr. Rubio to resources that will be helpful in his new endeavors.

Progress

Dr. King notes and comments on a quote from James H. Robinson's "The New History" on the eternal law of progress.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Centennial Edition of The Nation

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

James J. Storrow, Jr., Publisher of The Nation, invites Dr. King to advertise in its 100th anniversary edition. Storrow suggests that Dr. King could write an article on SCLC's achievements and services to the community within the advertisement.

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

St. Augustine Tutorial Project

This document references a tutorial program organized by students from Yale for the benefit of students in St. Augustine. The flyer advises those interested in the program to stop by the SCLC office and fill out an information sheet.

Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, September 27, 1967

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Suffering

Dr. King notes his thoughts on the question of the Biblical prophet Habakkuk: "why do the wicked prosper?"

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

Saturday, July 29, 1967

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

Love

Dr. King writes on the Apostle Paul’s concept of love.

Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Friday, December 10, 1965

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

Thursday, June 11, 1964

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Proposed Agenda of Board Meeting

This document is a draft of an outline for the proposed agenda of an SCLC board meeting.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Birmingham Manifesto

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama by the African American community and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights.

Congratulatory Telegram to Thurgood Marshall from MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Dr. King congratulates Thurgood Marshall on being appointed to the US Supreme Court. Dr. King also emphasizes that Marshall's position is a major advancement towards a color-blind society.