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Ritschl and Schleiermacher on Method

Dr. King sketches his view of methodologies employed by German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1961

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Letter from Anna Gallaspy to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Anna Gallaspy, Production Director of the Immanuel United Church of Christ in Los Angeles, extends an invitation for Dr. King and members of the SCLC to review their outline of a youth festival pilot program.

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966

Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Telegram from Yamanaka TV to Pete Seeger

Monday, December 4, 1967

A Japanese television host writes American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger requesting that he encourage Dr. King to accept an invitation to appear on the show.

Breadbasket Food Chain Sign Contract

Saturday, November 19, 1966

These articles highlight a contract that was signed by High Low Foods Inc. and Operation Breadbasket to increase the number of jobs for Negroes.

Letter from Herman Schuchman to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Herman Schuchman writes Dr. King on behalf of the American Orthopsychiatric Association to invite him to their annual meetings in the spring of 1968. The association is interested in presenting a program that involves the issues of war, civil rights and human rights. They request Dr. King share his intellect and experiences surrounding the civil rights issues in the United States.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Letter from the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. Milnor Alexander congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to for him to speak at the Legislative Seminar during the 50th anniversary celebration of WILPF.

Telegram from Rev T R Albert to MLK

Rev. T.R. Albert, Pastor of Weslay Methodist Church, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sent Dr. King words of encouragment while he recovered in the Harlem hospital.

American Negro Corporation Plan

This document is a plan created by Sterling B. Conaway. The purpose was to create a business organization for Negro professionals to invest in their future. This document also outlines the purpose and priorities of the organization.

Letter from Gary L. Garber to MLK from Grace College

Monday, March 25, 1968

Gary L. Gerber writes Dr. King concerning Grace College's participation in Choice '68, which is a National Presidential Primary sponsored by Time Magazine.

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

Black Power - Dr. Vincent Harding

Dr. Harding gives a full detailed presentation on Black Power before the Southeastern Regional Advisory Board of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.

Choice 68 Request for Information

The students of the Catholic University of America are participating in the Choice 68' elections and request that Dr. King provide information of himself so that they may further promote his Presidential candidacy.