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Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable J. Caleb Boggs

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator James Caleb Boggs of Delaware to commend his role in "forging the bi-partisan unity" that made possible the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Man (A Fatalistic View)

Dr. King includes a quote from the Persian philosopher Omar Khayyam.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Coretta's Personal Story

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

Agnosticism

Dr. King quotes Ernst Haeckel's "The Riddle of the Universe."

Letter from Andree Dwan Gipson to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Andree Gipson, Director of the Human Rights Committee of the University Student Government, proposes a reception for Dr. King during his visit to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Gipson also sends Dr. King a copy of the student newspaper, POST, that announces the date of Dr. King's speaking engagement.

Program from the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention

Monday, August 8, 1966

This is the Tentative Programme of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Tenth Annual Convention. The convention was held in Jackson, Mississippi at a Masonic Temple and hosted by the Reverend Allen Johnson. The four day convention was themed "Human Rights - The Continuing Struggle."

Letter from C. I. C. Bosanquet to MLK

Wednesday, November 22, 1967

Vice Chancellor Bosanquet of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne provides Dr. King with the photographs from the honorary degree service. In addition, he expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit in the mist of his "strenuous" and "eventful" life.

Letter from MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Thursday, February 22, 1968

This is a copy of the response letter dated February 9, 1968. It is addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from James W. Thetford to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

A 75-year old man expresses his discontent with the Vietnam War and his belief that America's economic and social problems are inextricably linked to the ongoing military occupation in Vietnam.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Letter from Frederick Koury and Albert Shanker to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

Various representatives of the United Federation of Teachers in New York City inquire if Dr. King would be able and willing to speak at their upcoming Spring Conference Luncheon. Bayard Rustin will be the guest of honor and will receive the John Dewy Award.

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

Urban Training Center for Christian Mission

Friday, July 7, 1967

Included in this letter to the board members of the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission are several pertinent documents from the organization. The author of the letter, Jim Morton, informs the reader of an upcoming board meeting and encourages them to turn in an application for "The Now Thing" as soon as possible.

News Article "Who Creates Slums?"

J. Frank Lindsey reports Mr. Hilliard's views about how slums are created. The reasons cited by Mr. Hilliard include undisciplined children and landlords who don't take care of their property.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Attorney Solomon Seay, Jr.

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Reverend Williams writes to Attorney Seay requesting advance notice, of three to four weeks, for persons appearing in court. He also states that it would be helpful if he would give the dates of the arrests and the charges.

Letter from Leonard E. Smith to MLK

Friday, October 6, 1967

Leonard Smith writes to Dr. King concerning a new venture of the National Sharecroppers Fund, which seeks to invest Negro business captial in Southeastern farming areas to benefit the rural poor.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to SCLC

Monday, September 24, 1962

On the occasion of SCLC’s Annual Convention, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy states that the country has made great strides toward the realization of SCLC’s goal of assuring the rights of citizenship to all. The Department of Justice has acted and will continue to act to protect the right to vote.

Happiness

Dr. King outlines insight from philosophers Spinoza and Nietzsche regarding the concept of happiness.

Letter from Annette P. Johnson to Reverend Charles C. Carpenter

Tuesday, May 14, 1963

Annette P. Johnson writes Bishop Carpenter concerning her initiative to seek better understanding of his status on supporting racial equality. Johnson believes that Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" was directed at Reverend Carpenter and other Southern clergymen like him.

Letter from Mrs. George W. Hammond to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Mrs. Hammond writes Reverend Abernathy with the hope of finding someone to purchase her home in Bristol, New Hampshire.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967

Dr. King discusses the primary three dimensions of life, which include: length, breadth, and height.