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"PAKISTAN"

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Friday, April 15, 1960

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

Letter from MLK to Melvin W. Trent

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King recommends that Melvin W. Trent file a complaint with the Civil Rights Commission about the unjust labor situation in Newport News.

Letter from Rev. Camilo A. Boasso to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964

In this document, a Catholic priest from Argentina writes to Dr. King and congratulates him for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The priest also inquires about obtaining permission to translate into Spanish Dr. King's recent book "Why We Cant Wait." Requests like this increased significantly as Dr. King's prominence grew.

God's Relation to the World

Dr. King outlines the sermon "God's Relation to the World." Dr. King breaks down the sermon into three themes: God's creation of the world, His conservation of the world, and His transformation of the world.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers send an itemized royalty statement to Dr. King for his book titled, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

MLK's Handwritten Note Card

On this note card, Dr. King contemplated the definition of "religion". This is an example of the many note cards that reflected Dr. King's research and consequently, influenced his writings.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962

Sarah Harvey states that the receipt of Dr. King's letter and book made her feel "very unworthy." Mrs. Harvey also makes financial a contribution.

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

World

Dr. King discusses Paul Tillich's definition of the world as a "unity of manifoldness" in "Systematic Theology."

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Card from Joyce Anderson to MLK

Saturday, September 27, 1958

Joyce Anderson sends Dr. King a "get well" card with a note of encouragement after he was stabbed by a woman in Harlem, New York.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 18, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary for the Hadley Executive Committee, writes Miss McDonald to finalize a date and place for Dr. King to give a lecture in support of the Hadley Memorial Fund.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Letter from Mary L. Rhett to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Mary Rhett writes Dr. King informing him that she has a very important matter to discuss with him regarding the civil rights struggle.

Postcard Sent to MLK

This unsigned postcard sent from Memphis, Tennessee depicts Dr. King and Lyndon B. Johnson pulling down a judge who symbolizes justice.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to MLK

Sunday, April 18, 1976

Ernest Shaefer writes Dr. King relaying detailed information regarding Dr. King's travel to Philadelphia International Airport and his speech at Unionville High School in Pennsylvania.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

Drafted Letter by Dr. King

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

This is an incomplete draft letter by Dr. King in response to a request.

Letter from Reverend V. W. Glanton to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Reverend V. W. Glanton encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC after receiving communications about voter registration initiatives in the South.

Letter from MLK to Linda Cann

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

Dr. King writes Linda Cann, a member of the Canadian Women's Press Club in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He informs Mrs. Cann that he cannot accept her invitation to speak in Nova Scotia because he is trying to "grapple with the problems of discrimination that Negroes still face."