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"PAKISTAN"

Letter from MLK to Miss Kathy Granata

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Kathy Granata hoping that her words reflect the attitudes and thinking of the majority of today's young people. The Reverend continues by addressing Granata's young friend, stating that his exposure to her may aid him toward discovery.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

News/Letter: Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Here is a 1967 newsletter from the Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence, covering a number of topics including the Vietnam War, the March on Washington, fascism, and non-violent tactical plans.

Letter from Devi Prasad to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

Devi Prasad, the General Secretary of War Resisters' International, wrote Dr. King to inform him of a leaflet to be published and distributed. The leaflet contained information about the Declaration of Human Rights. Enclosed in the letter is an example of the leaflet.

Letter from Mrs. Robert King to MLK

Mrs. Robert King thanks Dr. King for his work and gives him a "contribution to the cause of Peace."

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes to Dr. King regarding his "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Letter from Prarthana Samaj Bombay (India) to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

The former ambassador of India to the United States previously wrote Dr. King, inviting him to the Centenary Celebrations. The author recalls this invitation and references the history of Bombay's Prarthana Samaj. The organization is founded on the betterment of society, religion and education. The Prarthana Samaj would be proud to welcome Dr. King, as he is an "apostle" of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Dr. Carlyle Marney

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Ralph David Abernathy writes to Reverend Carlyle to confirm his attendance to a conference held on May 6, 1965.

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Letter from MLK to Dr. M. R. Cherry

Tuesday, September 27, 1966

Dr. King informs Dr. M. R. Cherry that he will be unable to accept his invitation to speak at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. King states that his schedule is busy as he is trying to spread social justice in America.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King sketches notes on "the most original thinker in Danish history."

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Letter from Johan Mulert to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967

Mr. Mulert requests for Dr. King to send him an autograph and a photo.

High School Seniors in Chicago Request Conversation with MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Edward Foreman, on behalf of the senior class at J.H. Bowen High School in Chicago, Illinois, invites Dr. King to lead a discussion regarding the issues that brought about Dr. King's adventure to Chicago.

Letter from John W. Wydler to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Wydler of New York responds to Dr. King's letter on the seating of the Mississippi delegation to Congress. Dr. King's letter, sent to several government officials prior to the vote, urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the current delegation.

United Nations Seminar Brochure

This pamphlet offers information on the registration, time, place, and cost of the United Nations Seminar being held in Washington D.C from October 17-21, 1966. Enclosed is a registration form for the Seminar.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

Monday, September 24, 1962

President Kennedy compliments Dr. King and his organization for their persistent push for equal rights in America.

Letter from Reynold Moody to MLK

Reynold Moody, a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps, expresses support to Dr. King on behalf of the Miami, Florida Veterans for Peace.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Worship

Dr. King provides a definition of worship.