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Letter from Howard R. Neville to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

Michigan State provost, Howard Neville, tells Dr. King that Dr. Robert Green is available for a one year leave of absence for the Neighborhood Leader Training Program.

Brunner & Niebuhr

Dr. King relates Swiss theologian Emil Brunner to American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in that they both argue that reason is for adjusting to the material world, and faith is for dealing with God.

Letter from James W. Ealey to MLK

Friday, June 21, 1963

The Baptist Minister's conference of Richmond and vicinity writes Dr. King, enclosing a contribution of $367.20 for the expenses incurred in the Birmingham struggle.

Robert Garrett Asks Dr. King for Information

Robert Garrett writes Dr. King to find out more information about the goals of his organization. Dr. King decides to send a brochure.

The Georgia State Senate

Friday, September 2, 1966

The Georgia State Senate informs fellow Democrats of an important meeting before the 1966 Primary Election. This meeting will focus on finalizing plans for their participation in this election.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from Era Canon to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1961

Era Canon notifies Dr. King that her friend Doris Greene, whom recently passed, was very intrigued by his work. Mrs. Canon wants to contribute to Dr. King's organization with some of the finances Mrs. Greene has obtained upon her passing.

Program: The Call To Worship

Sunday, July 11, 1965

This program outlines the order of service at Friendship Baptist Church in Pasadena, California. Dr. King is highlighted as the guest speaker at the Sunday morning service.

Letter from Harry Daniels to President Johnson

Sunday, December 25, 1966

Harry Daniels sends a copy of his letter to President Johnson to Dr. King, granting him permission to reprint it in his publications. In the letter, Daniels urges that in order to advance the freedom and equality of the United States, we must end poverty.

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Tuesday, October 25, 1960

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from Gaye Breitel to MLK

Gaye Breitel, a ten year old from New York, writes Dr. King to request an autographed photo or book with a recent picture.

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Letter to MLK from the Women For: Organization

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The WOMEN FOR: organization sent Dr. King a letter with their enclosed policy regarding the conflict in Vietnam. Women For: is a non-partisan civic organization that is actively involved in local, national, and international affairs. The group of over 2,000 women believed, unanimously, that the United States should cease all military occupation.

Letter from Judith Brockhart to MLK Regarding a Fine Relief

Monday, October 2, 1967

In this letter Judith Brookhart appeals to Dr. King and the SCLC for aid in paying fines accrued from being arrested during civil rights marches.

Letter from Senator Jacob Javits to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Senator Javits writes Dr. King to thank him for reaching out to him in need of funds for the SCLC. Mr. Javits then encloses a small contribution and apologizes for not being able to contribute more.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Monday, July 8, 1963

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.

Jesus: Humanity and Ethical Character

Dr. King lists verses from the New Testament on Jesus as an ethical character and man as sinner.

Letter from "The Nation" to MLK

"The Nation" sends Dr. King payment for his article, "Let Justice Roll Down." The article was published in the March 15, 1965 edition of the publication.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Sermon Notes of Dr. King

The document, seen here, contains sermon notes written by Dr. King. The tittle of this sermon is listed as "The Jungles of Life", with the scripture passage coming from Jeremiah 12:5.

Letter from A. K. Magugu to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

The Office of Kenya National Celebrations congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author encloses an invitation card in hopes that the Reverend may attend their Anniversary and Republic Day Celebrations.


Dr. King quotes Karl Barth regarding the nature of God. In addition, Dr. King provides bibliographical information for the quote.

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Oliver W. Holmes

Friday, January 24, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Holmes that Dr. King is out of the country, but that a tentative date has been set for Dr. King to meet with Mrs. Faber, a student who would like to speak with Dr. King regarding her dissertation.

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.