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"PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED"

Letter from the Unitarian Church of Germantown to MLK

Friday, February 23, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests Dr. King's presence during the Pulpit Schedule for 1962-1963. The organization is aware of Dr. King's endless schedule and provides him with a honorarium if he were to accept this invitation.

Martin Luther King Does It Again

Sunday, April 23, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM

Ralph C. Bailey, a marcher in the New York City demonstration against the War in Vietnam, describes the demonstration as an "impressive spectacle" of people of all ages and races. He praises Dr. King for combining revolution with nonviolence in hopes of a peaceful demonstration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
New York (NY)

The document references earnings from Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962
Ohio (OH), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Birthday Card From Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

An Invitation to a Dedication by Olivet and Her Friends

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Olivet Institutional Baptist Church sponsors a month long dedication to the opening of the O. M. Hoover Christian Community Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. King is listed as a participant in the dedication.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Jaggart to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Mr and Mrs. C. Jaggart express how much they enjoyed one of Dr. King's messages.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from Edinbugh University to MLK

Sunday, July 31, 1966

Malcom L. Rigkind, the President of Debates at Edinburgh University, renews an invitation for Dr. King to speak in Scotland.

Letter from Richard Boone Regarding Child Development Program in Mississippi

Thursday, February 2, 1967
Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, encloses a news release regarding the upcoming opening of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Telegram from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL

Talk show host and columnist Irv Kupcinet invites Dr. King to make an appearance on his television panel. Mr. Kupcinet discloses knowledge of Dr. King's visit to Chicago for an announcement on July 24, 1965, and encourages the civil rights leader to appear on the show later that afternoon.

Memorandum from William M. Gray

Friday, April 5, 1968
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

This memorandum from William M. Gray lists the address to which mourners should send acknowledgements following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
West Virginia (WV)

Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.

Letter from John G. Kirk to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

John G. Kirk of Metromedia asks Dr. King to write an editorial for a future publication called "America Now." Dr. King's article is to be based on the assumption that it is the responsibility of the government to enhance the dignity of individual citizens.

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA)

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Letter from T. Jansma of the Dutch Baptist Union to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
NETHERLANDS, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

T. Jansma, General Secretary of the Dutch Baptist Union, asks Dr. King to deliver a speech to Baptists in Amsterdam while he is in the city to receive an honorary degree.

Personality

Dr. King cites a quote from J. M. E. McTaggart's understanding of personality from "Studies in Hegelian Cosmology."

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
ISRAEL

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Problems of Whitehead

Dr. King discusses the problem of metaphysical dualism as presented by philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Dr. King reviewed much of Whitehead's work while at Boston University and later quoted him in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

Sunday, July 26, 1964
Washington (WA)

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.