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"PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED"

Letter from William Reynolds to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Mr. Reynolds writes Dr. King requesting to use quotations from his April 5th speech to encourage a higher attendance at future vigils in the Bay Area.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from the United Nations to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Robin Skuce, Education Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada, writes Dr. King inquiring of his availability to lecture at a seminar for high school students at their New York headquarters.

Environmental Influence

Dr. King contemplates "environmental influence" by comparing Spencer and Darwin.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Telegram to MLK Regarding a Social Eruption in Chicago

Tuesday, June 14, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Dr. King a typed version of his statement on the violence occurring in a predominately Puerto Rican neighborhood in Chicago. Through the incident, Dr. King notes the callousness of law enforcement in the area.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Green

Monday, January 22, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald tells Dr. Robert Green that Dr. King has approved Dr. Green's forward for the "Famous American Series."

Letter from Linda F. Neslage to MLK Regarding the I Have a Dream Speech

Monday, April 3, 1967

In this letter Linda F. Neslage of Scott Foresman and Company requests Dr. King's permission for non-profit organizations to make special editions of textbooks including his speech, "I Have A Dream."

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion" on temporal things so filling people's minds that they don't have room for the eternal. He contrasts this with pantheism. The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

Telegram from SCLC to Miss Geneva Jones

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

The SCLC writes Miss Geneva Jones providing her information on their traveling agenda for a trip to McIntosh, Georgia.

Letter Draft from MLK to Mrs. Lewiston

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Lewiston to inform her that he will not be able to assist her with her financial problems because of the financial burdens that have already been placed on SCLC.

Letter from M. G. Gilligan to MLK and James Baldwin

Saturday, July 6, 1963

Mrs. M. G. Gilligan expresses admiration to Dr. King and Mr. Baldwin for the production of the television program entitled "Perspectives."

Letter from Stephen Siteman to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King, Stephen Siteman encloses a letter that Norman Thomas wrote for the New York Times.

God

Dr. King references the book of Job by discussing the immense and power of God.

In Memoriam MLK: New York Times

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This newspaper clipping is one of several full-page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings by the NAACP accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the organization to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Letter of Support from Dr. May Chinn to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963

On a recent vacation, Dr. Chinn attended a "friends meeting" in a small town outside of Williamsburg, Pennsylvania. Chinn noticed that Dr. King's teachings and spiritual dedication had profoundly influenced that community. He states that Dr. King has inspired people both in that town and around the world, and that he is "everyone's leader."

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes John M. E. McTaggart's "Some Dogmas of Religion."

Letter from Erica Smith to MLK

Monday, August 20, 1962

Erica Smith writes Dr. King to express her dismay for the people who are against the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Smith is in full support of Dr. King's fight for social justice and prays for his continuing journey.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Sunday, August 6, 1967

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.

Letter from Daniel F. Byrne to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel F. Byrne, an army chaplain from the 24th Infantry Division, requests a copy of the address Dr. King gave to the World Conference of Churches in Switzerland.