Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED"

An Evening of Music

Sunday, April 15, 1962

The English family provides Ebenezer Baptist Church with "An Evening of Music" in the spring of 1962.

Letter from Reverend William D.F. Morris to MLK

Sunday, December 20, 1964

Rev. William D. F. Morris, of Centennial United Church in Toronto, invites Dr. King to visit his church during Lent.

Contradiction

Dr. King writes a quote expressing the bounds of consciously living in contradiction.

Correspondence: Telgegram from W.A. Flowers to Dr.King

Friday, September 9, 1966

This telegram from W.A. Flowers is offering words of support and encouragement to Dr. King and the movement. Flower discourages the behavior leaders, such as Stokley Carmichael and hopes Dr. King stands firm to his conviction to better all man kind.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

The Misuse of Prayer

Monday, July 17, 1950

In this sermon delivered at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King elaborates on the proper uses of prayer and how it should be a supplemental asset.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Letter from Ruth H. Bunche to MLK

Saturday, September 9, 1967

Mrs. Ruth H. Bunche appeals to Dr. King for his financial support for Inwood House, a support system for unmarried mothers. Enclosed is a brochure describing the program and its services.

Letter of Support from Lars Sodersten to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Lars Sodersten offers support to the civil rights movement on behalf of concerned Swedish residents. He also informed Dr. King of his plans to raise money for SCLC and the movement.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

Support Card from Ida White and Jenae Jackson to MLK

Ida Mae White and Jenae Jackson send Dr. King this spiritual card regarding faith in God during his time in jail.

MLK Draft: Man's Extensions

Dr. King describes how man has invented tools to extend his knowledge: the telescope for his eyes, the microphone and radio for his ears, and the airplane and automobile for his legs.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Extreme Unction

Dr. King defines extreme unction from the perspective of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthadox church.

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

Annalee Stewart confirms with Dora McDonald that Dr. King will be the keynote speaker for the 50th Anniversary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Handwritten notecard regarding Realism

Index card written by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Biographical Sketch of James Bevel

This one page biography summarizes the achievements of James Bevel, one of the founding members of SNCC. The biography highlights Bevel's involvement with civil rights drives in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, including the Freedom Rides and numerous SCLC action programs.

Schleiermacher (The Original Righteousness of Man)

Dr. King writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view that original perfection is part of human nature.

Letter from Mrs. Frank Summers to SCLC

Monday, April 9, 1962

Mrs. Frank Summers sends contribution to SCLC and wishes to pass on the March SCLC Newsletter.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Monday, July 30, 1962

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.