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"PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED"

What is the OIC Institute?

Philadelphia, PA

This brochure for the Opportunities Industrialization Center describes what it provides for students with the characteristics and training needed to develop an accelerated professional caliber for employment.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, POLAND, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY, CANADA, FRANCE, CUBA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, COLOMBIA, VENEZUELA, South Carolina (SC)

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

Letter from Gerhard Amendt to MLK

New York (NY), GERMANY

Gerhard Amendt of the West German Radio Corporation expresses his interest in having Dr. King give his opinion of the Civil Rights Movement.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

Seating List for Pacem In Terris II

Geneva, Switzerland

This document is an alphabetical seating list of participants for the Pacem In Terris II (Peace on Earth) Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Reading, Writing, and Race Relations

Thursday, June 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dorothy Singer wrote this piece,"Reading, Writing and Race Relations", regarding the racial integration in schools. Singer discusses several studies and their findings regarding integration.

Old Age

Dr. King discusses the topic of old age. He references French poet Victor Hugo quoting, "winter was on his head but eternal spring was in his heart."

Wycliffites: Followers of John Wycliffe

Dr. King writes on the ideas of English philosopher John Wycliffe's followers, "Wycliffites."

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

God

Dr. King quotes a passage from Psalms 77:13, which discusses the greatness of God through comparison to other gods.

Letter from Gregory Bergman to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
California (CA), Berkeley, CA

Mr. Bergman asks if he could receive a copy of Dr. King's speech given at Riverside Church. He regarded the speech as "one of the great speeches of our time."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

Letter to Dr. Neil V. Sullivan from Robert L. Green

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Berkeley, CA

Robert Green expresses his appreciation for Dr. Neil Sullivan's chapter contribution in the book, "Education and the Urban Poor." Mr. Green is pleased when he discovers Dr. Sullivan has contributed a portion of the book profits to Dr. King and the SCLC. The book will be in demand for college level courses focusing on education, psychology and sociology.

A Journey of Conscience

VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Washington, D.C., SOUTH AFRICA, ALGERIA

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Card from Joyce Anderson to MLK

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York (NY)

Joyce Anderson sends Dr. King a "get well" card with a note of encouragement after he was stabbed by a woman in Harlem, New York.

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962
Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Thursday, August 8, 1963
Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.

Correspondence Letter to Mrs. King from Paul Torres

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

The Montgomery Story

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, California (CA), San Francisco, CA, Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967
New York (NY), NIGERIA

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Letter from George W. Chivers to MLK

Saturday, August 20, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

George W. Chivers writes to Dr. King objecting to the Alabama law that disallows women from sitting as jurors. He compares this denial of women's civil rights to the injustices suffered by Negroes in Alabama.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967
GREECE, ISRAEL

Dimitri Papaspyrou, the President of the Parliament of Greece, welcomes Dr. King to Athens during his upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land.