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Letter from Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Hector G. Trout, Assistant Secretary of the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, expresses interest in Dr. King speaking at their teachers' convention.

Letter from R. William Johnson to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966

Bill Johnson writes Dr. King with an interest in starting a chapter of the SCLC in Oak Ridge. Johnson also invites Dr. King to visit Oak Ridge and speak with members of its community.

Letter from Pamela Schnida to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1067

Pamela Schnida writes to Dr. King requesting information on the riots that occurred in 1967.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

Thursday, February 27, 1964

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Gladys Foreman

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald thanks Ms. Gladys Foreman for her contribution of stamps.

Ordained by God

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King for his proposed hypocrisy. The author contends that violence and law breaking are ungodly behaviors and therefore should not be associated with the peace movement that Dr. King endorses.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.

Fear

Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

Letter from MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King shares his contentment with the company of Pastor Charles Westphal and the rest of the French Protestant Federation.

Letter from John A. Collison to MLK

Saturday, August 15, 1964

John Collision writes Dr. King regarding race relations in America. Collision wants Dr. King to understand that majority of whites have no hatred toward blacks, but instead "a strangeness" and questioning of why people are different shades.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Jefferson County Jail Guidelines

The Jefferson County Jail guidelines are listed in this document.

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Letter from Seabury Press to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967

Alda Lee Boyd, publicity director for the Seabury Press, asks Dr. King if he would write a statement that can be used to promote "The Jon Daniels Story." The book is about an Episcopal seminary student, Jonathan Daniels, who was killed while working in Mississippi following the Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Letter of Support from Lars Sodersten to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Lars Sodersten offers support to the civil rights movement on behalf of concerned Swedish residents. He also informed Dr. King of his plans to raise money for SCLC and the movement.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Letter from Ben J. Mack to Reverend Andrew Young

Ben Mack forwards to Reverend Young an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the annual banquet of the South Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Law Suit Against Wrens Nest

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

This letter from Mrs. A. L. Wilkinson to a lawyer, is urging this person to help a man to win his case against tha Association responsible for keeping Negroes from entering the Wren's Nest in Atlanta.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.