Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"PERU"

Letter from Robert Stock to MLK

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Robert Stock sends Dr. King a copy of a magazine called "Petroleum Today." The magazine offers their audience public information about the oil industry as well as human interests including education, art, and history.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Telegram from the Church of Sweden to MLK

Tuesday, March 3, 1964

The Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to take part in a great church event in the fall of 1964. The church assures Dr. King that all expenses will be paid for his travel and the archbishop of Sweden will provide him with the official invitation letter.

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mary V. Leath

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Mary Leath of Dr. King's current incarceration in Selma, Alabama. McDonald also tells Leath that her request will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

Letter from MLK to Universal Life Insurance

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr. King expresses appreciation to Universal Life Insurance Company for their generous contribution, and remarks the SCLC is strengthen by the undergirding support of loyal supporters.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Baruch Treiger

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Dr. King thanks the National Women's League for its continued financial support of the SCLC.

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Ellington

Wednesday, July 28, 1965

Dr. King writes Ruth Ellington of New York to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He describes the current efforts of the SCLC and explains the importance of supporters for the continuation of the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William R. Cummings

Monday, December 18, 1961

Dora McDonald writes William Cummings to inform him that Dr. King is in jail at the moment and the date of his return is difficult to determine. She explains that he will eventually be happy to learn of Mr. Cummings' invitation, but unfortunately his schedule will permit his attendance.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

Letter from Dwight Campbell to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964

The Methodist Youth Fellowship extends a second invitation to Dr. King to speak to in Philadelphia. The proposed speaking engagement would coincide with Dr. King's appearance at the Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee meeting.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

The Dexter Echo: Christianity & Curiosity

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

Congregation members and supporters of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama are informed of monthly programming and important updates, including the recent change in pastoral leadership from Dr. Martin Luther King to Rev. Herbert H. Eaton.

Letter from John Huston to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Letter from Client's Law Firm to MLK

Tuesday, September 20, 1966

Green, Ayers, Swigert, and Cluster write a letter to Dr. King requesting that he speak to Randolph T. Blackwell and encourage him to acknowledge receipt of a poem.

SCLC Newsletter: January-February 1966

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This early 1966 SCLC Newsletter reports the organization's recent activity. Main columns focus on Hosea Williams' voter registration work in Birmingham, Alabama and efforts towards slum eradication in Chicago and Atlanta. The document also includes photographic content of Dr. King's public speaking endeavors and evidence of the slum crisis. Consistent school inequities and segregation are the last topics discussed.

Post Card to MLK from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College

Monday, September 12, 1966

This 1966 post card from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College, is a thank-you note to Dr. King and "the Morehouse men" who made alumni contributions.

Letter from Louis Braun to MLK

Thursday, July 29, 1965

The National Chairman of the Campus Americans for Democratic Action reminds Dr. King of an earlier letter in which Dr. King was invited to serve on the organization's advisory board. Braun also lists individuals who have agreed to serve on the board.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."