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Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

Index Card - MLK Handwritten Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King focused on the topic, The Kingdom of God. He referenced Cave, author of 'The Christian Way.'

Telegram to MLK from Kjell Eide

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Kjell Eide requests Dr. King's participation in a peace delegation regarding the conflict in Vietnam.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Statement on CORE Supportive Action Against Variety Chain Store Discrimination in the South

Sunday, February 12, 1961

The Congress of Racial Equality issues a statement regarding economic boycotts of chain stores in the North that have segregated stores in the South. These boycotts are in support of desegregation efforts in the South.

Coretta Scott King Program

A program from the First Baptist Church recognizing Coretta Scott King, dated April 30, 1959.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.

Mission Development Report

Sunday, January 1, 1967

This report outlines the structure and development of the North Carolina Leadership Training Project.

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

The Central Presbyterian Church Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

Elmer Elsea enlightens Dr. King on how his involvement with the previous Holy Week brought joy and blessings. Mr. Elsea discovers Dr. King will be returning to the Holy Land of Jerusalem for the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom. Mr. Elsea encourages Dr. King to utilize Citexco Tours to conduct his expedition.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Letter from Leonard L. Smalls to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

Leonard Smalls invites Dr. King to speak at the Men's Day Conference at the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

MLK Thanks a Contributing Author

Dr. King writes to Mr. Morrow thanking him for sending a written manuscript of Marrow's new book. He apologizes for being unable to fully assist him in his writing endeavors.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

MLK - Notes on "Highest Value"

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's focus on the concept of "highest value" in its various iterations.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

This document is a letter from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. in regards to New York Times Magazine's request to reprint Dr. King's publication: "Where We Are Going". April 26, 1967

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?

Saturday, December 17, 1966

Dr. King outlines the ten chapters of his book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Letter from Mrs. Weitzler to Bayard Rustin

Friday, January 26, 1968

Mrs. Weitzler assesses the meaning of the "March on Washington" and the impact it has had on her.

Telegram from Dr. Richard Moore to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Dr. Richard Moore, on behalf of Bethune Cookman College, expresses support for Dr. King during the SCLC Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.