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Telegram from Thomas K. Gilmool and David N. Wice to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, San Francisco, CA, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. Gilmool and Mr. Wice write to confirm the date that Dr. King will be speaking at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Letter from James R. Hoffa to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

Teamsters President James (Jimmy) Hoffa requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the boycott in Alabama and how it relates to existing contractual agreements with interstate carriers.

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Thursday, November 21, 1963
Brooklyn, NY, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Illinois (IL)

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."

Crozer Theological Seminary: The Bulletin

Saturday, July 1, 1950
North Carolina (NC), Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Delaware (DE), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

The Bulletin, a newsletter sent to Dr. King from the Crozer Theological Seminary, includes information on the 1950 commencement. This is this institution from which Dr. King himself will graduate from in 1951.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

California (CA)

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

Letter from the Brotherhood Activities Committee to MLK

Thursday, October 31, 1963
West Virginia (WV), Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

The Brotherhood Activities Committee regrets that Dr. King will be unable to attend their speaking engagement. The committee requests that Dr. King provide them with a possible spokesman to speak in his absence. Fred Shuttlesworth and Morgan Collins serve as two primary options to serve the Ohio-West Virginia community.

Letter from Amnesty International to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965
DENMARK

On behalf of Denmark's chapter of Amnesty International, Mr. Bent Ostergaard writes Dr. King extending a speaking invitation. He is hopeful that Dr. King will return to Europe and accept the invitation to speak to youth and instill in them the significance of justice.

Letter from B. F. Ball to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

B. F. Ball informs Dr. King that he made a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference through his church.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Summary of 1968 Harris Survey Results

Monday, February 5, 1968
VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document summarizes the most recent Harris Surveys from 1968, reporting how the American people feel about President Johnson. Topics focused on include the War on Poverty, Vietnam, and Congress.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964
South Africa, Oslo, Norway

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

Press Release on School Integration of Taliaferro County, Georgia

Thursday, October 14, 1965
Georgia (GA)

This press release by Dr. King commends the decision of the three-judge panel on the decision of school integration.

Letter from Steve Addams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Selma, AL, California (CA)

Steve Addams writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for Dr. King's work. Addams also offers his condolences for the death of Martin Luther King, Sr.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Harper & Row, Publishers

Wednesday, October 24, 1962
New York, NY

The secretary of Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, sent this correspondence to Dr. King secretary, Miss. Dora McDonald. The content of the letter thanked Miss. McDonald, for sending a previous letter and requested additional chapters for Dr. King's second book. The book was entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

Monday, March 1, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Albany, GA

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Texas (TX)

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Letter From MLK to Reverend Sanders

In this letter, Dr. King expresses gratitude for the efforts Rev. Sanders has taken toward battling poverty.

Statement by Floyd McKissick

VIETNAM

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Richard M. Austin

Friday, February 2, 1968
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

William A. Rutherford, Executive Director of the SCLC, requests that Rev. Austin join a SCLC support committee. The support committee will offer assistance to the SCLC's upcoming campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from MLK to A. Phillip Randolph

Monday, April 13, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King writes A. Philip Randolph to acknowledge the need for future strategic planning in the civil rights movement.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.