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Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines

Saturday, March 23, 1985
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, ETHIOPIA

The Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines sponsored, Future Impact, a program to promote economic development for the company. The program also aids in enhancing the skills of the company's black employees.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Randolph T. Blackwell

Friday, December 2, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Harry Wachtel informs Randolph Blackwell that he's including $4,500 for the Southern Rural Action Project. The purpose of the project is to reduce the amount of poverty known to be prevalent in the south.

News from Highlander Folk School

Wednesday, December 2, 1959
Nashville, TN, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Tennessee (TN)

Beginning on January 15th, the News from Highlander Folk school will open its adult educational program. In support of the program, many renowned leaders across Amercia signed the statement.

Certainty (Religious)

Dr. King refers to Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" in regard to religious certainty.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, North Carolina (NC), Massachusetts (MA), JAPAN, SOUTH KOREA, HONG KONG, TAIWAN, PHILIPPINES, MEXICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, TANZANIA, GUATEMALA, PERU, CHILE, BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONAL STATE OF, COLOMBIA, KENYA, EL SALVADOR, BRAZIL, VENEZUELA, New Orleans, LA, Nashville, TN, Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), Colorado (CO), Montana (MT), GERMANY

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965
Washington, D.C.

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Letter from Mark Raphael to MLK

New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mark Raphael, the President of the All-Square Student Congress Speaker's Bureau at New York University, invites Dr. King to talk about his priorities in America and plans for Washington.

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from MLK Regarding Chicago Movement Efforts, Torn Document

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

With a future of brotherhood, freedom and harmony among all at the core of the fight for democracy, Dr. King, in this excerpt, stresses the need for support in the fight against injustice.

Constitution and Bylaws of the SCLC

Atlanta, GA

This booklet contains the constitution and bylaws of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Mrs. William Henry Slakey to MLK

California (CA)

Mrs. Slakey writes Dr. King to commend his letter denouncing the term "Black Power." In the post script, she requests a personal response instead of a form letter.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to express her concern about Miss Hoover contacting Dr. King instead of herself regarding his upcoming book.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Evil

Dr. King quotes the definition of evil and conceptualizes it as a "frustration."

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

Mississippi (MS), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Tennessee (TN)

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Max Stanford's Account

Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY)

This document written by an anonymous writer illustrates how officers attacked Max Stanford, a convicted felon, in a jail when he refused to obey a guard.

God: Judeo-Christian View vs. Greek View

Dr. King cites a passage from the Old Testament book of Psalms to compare and contrast the Jewish and Greek view of God.

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry Cohen

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, drafts this correspondence to Rabbi Henry Cohen in regards to a book he is publishing. Miss McDonald informs Rabbi Cohen that Dr. King grants permission to use excerpts from "Letter From Birmingham Jail." She also mentions the enclosure of Dr. King's reply and Dr. King wanting a copy of the book when published.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King composed these notes in preparation for a sermon. The themes include faith, man's dealing with crisis, and "God's Search for Man."

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

Wednesday, February 12, 1958
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

Declaration of the World Council of Peace on Vietnam

Monday, February 12, 1968
BELGIUM, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

The World Council of Peace issued this press release declaring their position against the Vietnam War. They state that they are pro-peace and against American oppression and that President Johnson is ignoring their peace proposals.

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Oslo, Norway, Montgomery, AL

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.