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Letter from S. W. Molodtsov to MLK

Thursday, January 19, 1967

The International Institute for Peace sends this letter to Dr. King on behalf of the World Council of Peace. A recent meeting undertook "a major step towards the international coordination of activities to end the war in Vietnam," and the meeting resulted the decision to host an international peace conference. Dr. King is invited to participate in the conference. The Council expresses that his presence and contribution would greatly enhance the conference's impact on anti-Vietnam efforts.

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

Letter from Martin Sizemoreto to Gentlemen

Martin Sizemore explains that the Madison Senior High School's Speech Department is researching a topic for their debate team and is in request for any literature that could contribute to their research.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Letter from Genevieve Fay to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

This letter from Mrs. Fay gives her appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts. She expresses her deep concern for the motives of the political figures in Washington, D.C., and the importance of Dr. King's presence to counter the imbalance.

Freedom (Of Choice)

Dr. King quotes Thomas Huxley's "Collected Essays" on the freedom to do right and to do wrong.

Marx

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Tuesday, April 16, 1968

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from Gunnar Jahn

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Gynnar Jahn organizes a delegation of Nobel Peace Prize winners who will have a discussion about the Vietnam War.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Letter from Blanche Shropshire to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

Mrs. Shropshire expresses her gratitutde to Dr. King for his inspiring words at an address delivered in Buffalo, New York.

Letter to Dora McDonald Regarding Persons Receiving Autographed Books

Thursday, June 29, 1967

Dora McDonald receives a list of names who are to receive autographed copies of Dr. King's book. The list consists of contributors to American Foundation on Nonviolence and SCLC.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Tuesday, May 21, 1963

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Solomon Mendelson

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this response letter to Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom in New York, Miss McDonald explains that Dr. King will make all efforts to attend the "I Have a Dream" musical performance.

Letter from Rev. O. L. Westley to Local Board

In this undated letter, Rev. Westley writes to the "Local Board" on the behalf of Mr. Stanley Howard, who is claiming status as a conscientious objector after being called to serve "in the Armed Service" [sic].

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Letter from Geraldine Jones to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Jones tells Dr. King about the heightened racial tension in Chicago, and her fear that Chicago will soon have a riot like Los Angeles.

Letter from Irene S. Heath to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

Professor Irene Heath writes from Uruguay to suggest white missionary activity in Africa end, and that Dr. King and other black Christian leaders return to Africa to do missionary work there.

The Central Presbyterian Church Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

Elmer Elsea enlightens Dr. King on how his involvement with the previous Holy Week brought joy and blessings. Mr. Elsea discovers Dr. King will be returning to the Holy Land of Jerusalem for the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom. Mr. Elsea encourages Dr. King to utilize Citexco Tours to conduct his expedition.

Why We Can't Wait Book Cover

This draft of Why We Can't Wait contains sketches of a cover, table of contents and edits of the brief description.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Postcard from Ollie Wilson to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Ollie Wilson expresses his opinion regarding war and evolution to Dr. King.