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Letter from James Schlatter to MLK

Friday, December 17, 1965
Illinois (IL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

James E. Schlatter, a student at Illinois State University, writes to Dr. King to request his comment on the effects of civil disobedience on law and order for his term paper on law enforcement.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
New York, NY, London, England

Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Immortality (Aquinas)

Dr. King references Saint Thomas Aquinas regarding the topic of immortality.

Letter from R. Elliot to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 14, 1968
San Francisco, CA, CANADA, New York (NY)

In this response letter, R. Elliot thanks Dora McDonald for her response to his inquiry regarding the redevelopment of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Lette from Alta Yount to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Alta Yount expresses her approval of a speech that Dr. King delivered. She also requests some copies of it.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3


In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

Jenner School Parents

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Presented here is a rough draft of an address delivered by Dr. King to the parents of Jenner Elementary school located in Chicago, Ill. Dr. King advises a plan to counteract deplorable school conditions as well as the misappropriation of tax dollars.


Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Letter from Sonia Schechter to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Sonia Schechter, President of Jewish Cultural Clubs and Societies, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC. Schechter also expresses great admiration to Dr. King for his "heroic leadership."

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, February 11, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Honolulu, HI, Hawaii (HI)

Dr. King sends Dr. Mays a check for $200 and informs him that he will not be able to attend the Founders' Day celebration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

SCLC Approved Budget

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Planned financial expenditures are listed in this approved 1968 budget for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

California (CA)

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Vietnam Week Pledge Card

New York, NY

The Student Mobilization Committee distributed this card as a promise to participate in the Student Week of Protest on April 8th- the 15th against the Vietnam war.

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964
SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Thursday, October 8, 1964
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Massachusetts (MA)

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

Letter from Rev. Canon John S. Yaryan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 13, 1964
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Yaryan writes to confirm Dr. King's appearance at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He asks that Dr. King preach not only for their morning service, but also the evening worhsip service as well.

Birthday Card from Belle and Cleveland to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Belle and Cleveland entitled, "North, South, East or West."

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

MLK Handwritten Notes

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding 'Love' and uses Reinhold Niebuhr as a reference.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966
New Hampshire (NH)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Letter from Harry A. Blachman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Cleveland, OH, VIETNAM

Harry Blachman writes Dr. King supporting his stance on Vietnam. He also requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the possibility of creating low-cost housing for low-income groups.

Letter from Irene S. Heath to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

Professor Irene Heath writes from Uruguay to suggest white missionary activity in Africa end, and that Dr. King and other black Christian leaders return to Africa to do missionary work there.

Letter from Louis C. Blount to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

Louis Blount of the Great Lakes Mutual Life Insurance Company in Michigan encloses a check to the SCLC.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."