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Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

The document references earnings from Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Marx, Karl

Dr. King quotes Karl Marx from J.W. Scott's "Syndicalism and Philosophic Realism."

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes on the concept of "Messianic Hope" as covered in the Old Testament book, Micah.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

The Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This program commemorates the inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster as the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Invitation from Charles H. Day to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965

In this letter, Charles H. Day encloses a letter that invites Dr. King to Iowa on the behalf of Reverend Edwin T. Dahlberg.

Event Program for Chester Robinson Tribute

Speaking invitation to Dr. King for a tribute to Chester Robinson and the West Side Organization at the First Congregational Church in Chicago.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Letter from US Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

United States Ambassador Findley Burns writes Dr. King expressing his joy regarding King's upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Despite warnings due to Middle East conflict, Burns hopes that Dr. King will not cancel the trip. He sees the visit as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the US and Jordan.

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Telegram from Ebenezer Baptist Church to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Ebenezer Baptist Church offers support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Stiv Jakobsson to MLK

Stiv Jakobsson expresses his wishes for Dr. King's well being due to the recent attacks against him. Various organizations in Sweden are engaging into an annual conference and are confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at the event.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Sunday, March 14, 1965

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

Telegram to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

The sender of this telegram is requesting to know if Dr. King intends to travel to Sweden.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

MLK's Speaking Itinerary

This list of speaking engagements documents Dr. King's busy schedule, in June 1965.

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

Answers in the American Way

Monday, March 25, 1968

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

Religion

Dr. King writes on the topic of religion, stating that the people living in the 18th century regarded religion as "the source of both political tyranny and social conflict."

Letter from Alfred K. Barr to MLK

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Alfred Barr, of the Cosmopolitan Club of the University of Georgia Athens, invites Dr. King to speak at their campus, citing the fact that Dr. King was the only Nobel Prize winner from Georgia.

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

SCLC Annual Meeting Program

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

This program outlines an annual meeting for the SCLC. The guest list includes Hall of Fame player Jackie Robinson, Septima Clark and Joseph E. Lowery.

Mission to Mississippi

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.