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Black Power

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

Subsistance Pay for Voter Workers

Friday, December 31, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Copy of a Crusade for Citizenship disbursement check paid to an Alabama worker in a Voter Registaion program. Reason for disbursement is subsistance pay.

Cover of the Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter

Monday, March 1, 1965
Iowa (IA)

The cover of Iowa's Catholic Interracial Council announces that Dr. King will be the recipient of the 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. The awards banquet is held in Davenport, Iowa.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965
Wyoming (WY)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from University of Saskatchewan's Student Union to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
CANADA, Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

A representative of the Student Union at the University of Saskatoon writes Dr. King inviting him to speak about the Civil Rights Movement. The representative asserts "the problems which you face are a matter for attention of the entire world."

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Letter from Agnes Rudell to MLK

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Ms. Rudell suggests that Dr. King should relocate to another country due to his dissatisfaction with the United States of America.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
New York, NY

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

Tuesday, April 9, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones of Morehouse College, asking him to translate the enclosed letter for Dr. King.

Letter from Rosslyn J. Shaw to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965
NEW ZEALAND, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Rosslyn J. Shaw invites Dr. King to speak to the New Zealand Universities Students' Association's annual Congress.

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964
New York, NY

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

A First Step Toward School Integration

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Robert Hilborn, President of The Empire Club of Canada invites Dr. King to be honored as the guest speaker. Hillborn offers the option of two different dates.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962
South Africa, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), London, England, GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Press Release Issued by MLK

Monday, June 5, 1961
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

The following document is a press release issued by Dr. King. In the first section, he comments on the success of various civil rights demonstrations across the nation. In the second section, of the press release, Dr. King makes a clear distinction between race riots and nonviolent movements in Alabama.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Telegram from Bob Dillon to MLK

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Alabama (AL)

In this telegram, Bob Dillon requests Dr. King's presence along with Reverend Billy Graham at a revival being held in what he classifies as an "unchristian community" in Birmingham.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

North Carolina (NC)

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King regarding certification from the SCLC and disagreements with the NAACP. He also seeks support from Dr. King to integrate the schools in Winston-Salem.

Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from G. P. Beckman to MLK

Thursday, November 3, 1960
Michigan (MI), ITALY

G. P. Beckman writes to Dr. King expressing his appreciation for people of similar faith. He asserts that he loves the black race as a whole and because of this love he does not want his children to grow up and experience similar persecutions.

Executive Orders

Dr. King drafts numerous directives pertaining to the 1964 expenses of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Richard Clemence to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Richard Clemence, a white Air Force officer, thanks Dr. King for his service to the nation in bringing people together. Clemence wrtes that "your steady guiding hand and spirit have led many to see the light of moral right."