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SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

Letter from Wendell Morgan to SCLC

Monday, July 31, 1967

Wendell Morgan encloses a check to SCLC on behalf of the Howard University Campus Chest.

MLK and the Alabama Boycott

This caricature of Dr. King depicts his trail from the March on Washington to his pursuing a boycott on the state of Alabama, following the Selma to Montgomery March. Gib Crockett of the Washington Star is the cartoonist for this drawing.

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

Letter from John Lewis to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

John Lewis thanks the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Board of Directors for their five thousand dollar contribution to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Mrs. E. A. Johnson to Mrs. Cotton

Saturday, March 31, 1962

A young male civil rights activist and participant in demonstrations experienced police brutality after he was targeted for his involvement in the Monroe Race Riot story. E. A. Johnson provides Mrs. Cotton with the legal details of the case surrounding the young man.

Letter from John H. Johnson to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

John H. Johnson, President and Editor at Johnson Publishing Company, informs Dr. King that a soldier has donated money to his organization and the NAACP.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "The Bible"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harold E. Fey

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Dora McDonald is requesting that Harold Fey re-new Dr. King's subscription to "The Christian Century" for one year.

God

Dr. King references a quote from Proverbs regarding creation and God's wisdom.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

Letter from Gunnar Magnus to MLK Requesting Interview

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

Mr. Magnus, a Norwegian journalists and student at Davidson College in North Carolina, requests Dr. King grant an interview for his paper, the "Morgenbladet".

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Noted Presbyterian Minister and pacifist Norman Thomas thanks Dr. King for sending a birthday message that was played at his reception. He further gives his well wishes to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and hopes to attend Dr. King's recognition ceremony.

Letter from MLK to SNCC's John Lewis Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Dr. King extends gratitude to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, for his encouraging letter upon the announcement of Dr. King being chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King states he does not accept this award as a tribute to himself, but as a tribute to the entire Civil Rights Movement. Lewis was regarded as a key SNCC leader and became the US Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district in 1987.

Letter from Rev. O. Tregelles Williams to MLK

Friday, February 10, 1967

Rev. Williams invites Dr. King to appear on a weekly BBC religious television program entitled "Meeting Point" during his visit to Wales in Great Britain.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Ralph Bunch Cooke's High School Report Card

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

This document is Ralph Bunch Cooke's report card reflecting his four years as a student at North Warren High School in Smiths Grove, Kentucky.

Letter of Inspiration from Dwight Church to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Dwight Church informs Dr. King that "actions count more than words." He further shares details about Clayton Powell and the progress of the Irish.

Theology

Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner's "The Mediator," and discusses the topic of theology as it relates to the church.

Letter to MLK from Paul Kennedy

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Paul Kennedy writes Dr. King to state that since Robert Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency, he believes hat an appreciative, token march on Washington would be more effective than a force march this year.

Telegram from A. G. Downing to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A. G. Downing, executive secretary of the Southern California Baptist Convention, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.