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Letter of Condolences on the death of MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter of condolence was written less than week after the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter the writer states,"We shall work toward his dream".


Dr. King draws an analogy between Columbus and Dr. Sigmund Freud in that each discovered a "continent."

Thank you Letter from MLK

Friday, January 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964
South Africa, Oslo, Norway

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Letter from James Marley to MLK

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

James Marley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Hotel and Club Employees Union Local 6, encloses a contribution to the SCLC "to aid [with] the great task to obtain equality for all Americans."

Letter from Hubert Reaves to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Rev. Ralph Abernathy was the recipient of this letter from a prison inmate. The author also makes a request for an SCLC membership form and a picture of Dr. King, as a keepsake.

Religious Book Club Invoices to MLK

New York (NY)

The Religious Book Club sends Dr. King complimentary copies of books on prejudice and healing ministry in the church.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Washington, D.C.

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Letter from The Bulstrode School Children to MLK

London, England, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

The Bulstrode school children write Dr. King concerning their initiative to fundraise for the Negro children in Mississippi and Alabama. They expressed to Dr. King how they decided to sell daffodils that were grown from their own gardens.

Letter from Silvio O. Conte to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Representative Silvio Conte informs Dr. King that he received Dr. King's letter pertaining to the petition for home-rule of Washington D.C. Conte asserts that he is a strong advocate for home-rule of the district.


Dr. King describes Edgar S. Brightman’s four attitudes of worship in “Philosophy of Religion.”

Executive Orders

Dr. King drafts numerous directives pertaining to the 1964 expenses of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Laurence Kirkpatrick to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The World Convention of Churches of Christ is requesting a photo and biography of Dr. King to use for publicity purposes at their Seventh Assembly where Dr. King will be in attendance.

The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.

Nature and Perception

Dr. King discusses his philosophical perspective on perception and nature.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA)

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962
Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

New York (NY), California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), New York (NY)

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines

Saturday, March 23, 1985
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, ETHIOPIA

The Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines sponsored, Future Impact, a program to promote economic development for the company. The program also aids in enhancing the skills of the company's black employees.

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."