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Letter from Leila Robins to MLK


Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.


Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl on Christology regarding Jesus' relation to God.

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Letter to the Managers of "Christianity Today'' from Rev Earl E. Josten

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Iowa (IA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 17, 1967, Josten writes to the managers of "Christianity Today" to inform them that he cannot comply with their request for names. He is not complying because of the attitude Christianity Today's editor is taking toward Dr. King. Rev. Josten is a pastor at The Methodist Church in Columbus Junction, Iowa. Josten offers prayer to the editor for his "terrible tirade" against King, and states that he will not commend this paper to any more friends if this attitude continues.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from William S. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William Thompson invites Dr. King to speak at the National Bar Association's 38th Annual Convention in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Congressman F. Bradford Morse to MLK

Monday, October 4, 1965
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA)

Massachusetts 5th District Representative F. Bradford Morse expresses his disappointment that the Home Rule bill for the District of Columbia was not approved. He informs Dr. King that further action is unlikely to be taken in 1965.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY), Kentucky (KY), New York, NY

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.

Letter from MLK to William Sibley

Monday, July 13, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Sibley for his contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He also reports the results of a recent fundraising reception, which will be used to establish Dr. Robert Hayling's practice and provide legal defense to participants in the Albany and St. Augustine Movements.

Laymen's Retreat League

Sunday, June 4, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY)

This letter from Thomas Gedeon serves as a response to a notion and tentative dates for a clergy retreat including Dr. King.

Letter from Eulah M. Eubank to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Eulah Eubank writes Dr. King regarding the Washington, D.C. Camp-In. She states she is "not...opposed" to marches and sit-ins, but feels that the Camp-In would be counter-productive. She believes it "will ad [sic] fuel to fires the extremists are trying build."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, April 24, 1964

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the German publishing house's request for a personalized forward for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Joani Kalmers to MLK

Saturday, July 15, 1967

Joani Kalmers, a senior at Thiel College, requests information from Dr. King and the SCLC regarding her thesis topic "Christianity and the Negro."

Briefing Sheet on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues

Ohio (OH)

This document contains the briefing notes on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964
Florida (FL)

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Class Notes Psalms

Dr. King writes several scriptures from the Book of Psalms found in the Old Testament of the Bible.

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers


Harvest House Limited, a publishing company, announce the release of Henry David Thoreau's essay collection regarding anti-slavery and reform.


Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from Arvella Gray to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Arvella Gray sends Dr. King some records for the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church to sing along with some of their pictures.

Anonymous Telegram to President Johnson

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO)

This telegram, intended for the White House, was sent regarding the treatment of a former African American Secret Service agent, Abraham Bolden, at the federal medical center in Springfield, Missouri. The sender states that President Johnson ought to follow the United States Constitution and restore Mr. Bolden's freedom or face consequences.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), ALGERIA

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

MLK Lauds Roy Wilkins for His Work with the NAACP

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA, GEORGIA

Dr. King honors Roy Wilkins for not only his efforts in the NAACP, but also his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

I'll Take My Stand

Washington, D.C.

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.