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Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Invitation from Jesse Jackson to MLK to Attend an Operation Breadbasket Workshop

Saturday, February 11, 1967

Dr. King receives an invitation from Jesse Jackson to help with a fundraising project for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

Letter From Emma Kramer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Emma Kramer writes Dora McDonald concerning a cancelled contract for Dr. King. Kramer emphasizes how imperative it is for a letter to be written on Dr. King's behalf providing an explanation as to why he is unable to fulfill his commitment.

Letter from MLK to Evert Svensson

Friday, May 29, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the Nobel Peace Prize Award nomination, but informs Evert Svensson that there are some roadblocks affecting his acceptance. The race problem in America requires his time, energy and presence in order to prevent the offset of violence. Dr. King inquires if the proposed date for the event could be altered.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Dr. King requests a telephone conversation with Miss Kitt.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Letter from MLK to Senator Howard Cannon

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Democratic Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Arnobius

Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.

Letter to MLK from N.P. Feinsinger

Friday, April 28, 1967

In this letter, Feinsinger is consulting Dr. King about the Russell Bull Scholarship and hoping that he can proceed with the selection process.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Plato Psychology

Dr. King explores Plato's contribution to psychology.

Barth - The Epistle to the Romans

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

I Sat Where They Sat Sermon Outline

This sermon draft of Dr. King's was never delivered, but focuses on the Christian themes of empathy and understanding. Dr. King claims that "if the white man was closer to the Negro he would... ...understand them" better.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Dr. J.M. Stansberry

Monday, July 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. Stansberry for his contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King states that without the aid from supporters, the initiatives of SCLC could not be carried out effectively.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

Robert L. Cope

Dr. King references Robert L. Cope’s article “Nature and/or Grace.”

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves issued this royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

MLK Schedule

This schedule of Dr. King's lists the dates and places he will be for the month of September and October.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Szolyvai

Sunday, July 26, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Szolyvai's request for a meeting with Dr. King. She informs him that Dr. King is unsure of the next time he will be in New York, however she says they will keep his letter in mind.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

Letter from MLK to Gerald A. Feffer

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King informs Gerald A. Feffer that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Lehigh University. King states, "I can think of nothing that I enjoy more than discussing some of the vital issues of the day with college and university students."