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"PORTUGAL"

Fund Raiser Event for the SCLC

Mrs. Richard Gile expresses her admiration to Dr. King for his work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The La Fleurs Garden Club wishes to sponsor a Benefit Freedom Tea event to raise money for the SCLC.

MLK Outline on Preaching Ministry

Dr. King outlines the development of the preaching ministry. As an aspiring minister, Dr. King expresses how he wishes to develop his own ministry and provides ideas of the message he desires to share.

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

Substance

Dr. King records some thoughts on the topic "substance," "a term used to signify that which is sought when philosophers investigate the primary being of things."

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."

Original Sin

From "The Epistle of the Romans," Dr. King records Karl Barth's observations regarding original sin, which are compared to views of the Bible, Saint Augustine and the Reformers.

Letter from Daniel Gallagher to MLK

Wednesday, May 23, 1962

Daniel Gallagher, manager of Textile Workers Union of America, encloses a check in the amount of $10.00 as a contribution to the SCLC.

Barth

Dr. King notes Karl Barth's views on Jesus.

Letter from Douglas B. Leeds to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Douglas Leeds, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at Babson Institute of Business Administration, writes Dr. King to request any information regarding his political views. He also invites Dr. King to speak at the Institute in the future.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

Man

Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Letter from John D. Silvera to MLK

Thursday, March 15, 1962

John D. Silvera proposes several mass media initiatives to Dr. King. Attached to this letter is a memorandum with additional information.

Letter from Mrs. Willie Mae White to SCLC

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mrs. Willie Mae White requests help from SCLC. She explains that she has fifteen children and would like to provide Christmas dinner and gifts, but does not have the financial means to do so. As a poor family in Scottsdale, Georgia, her family struggles, living without many basic necessities. Mrs. White also appeals to the members of SCLC, imploring them to send any available household ware, such as curtains, sheets, clothes, and kitchen utensils.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph Institue to MLK Regarding "Right to Work"

Monday, May 22, 1967

In this letter, Bayard Rustin, the Executive Director of A. Philip Randolph Institute, expresses gratitude for Dr. King signing the introduction - "Right to Work" Laws --A Trap for America's Minorities".

Registration Form for WCLC Assembly Session

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The Western Christian Leadership Conference sends this pamphlet to potential participants and encourages registration for the Assembly Session in July, 1965. Dr. King is featured as the Mass Meeting Speaker.

Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

Letter from Ted Mercer Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Mr. Mercer requests materials to promote Dr. King's candidacy in the "Choice '68" mock election program on the Bryan College campus. He also relays an invitation from the student body vice president asking Dr. King to speak on campus.

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Richard M. Austin

Friday, February 2, 1968

William A. Rutherford, Executive Director of the SCLC, requests that Rev. Austin join a SCLC support committee. The support committee will offer assistance to the SCLC's upcoming campaign in Washington, D.C.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

MLK Statement Regarding the Land Purchase Agreement with the Atlanta Housing Authority

Monday, July 31, 1967

With a purchase of land through the Atlanta Housing Authority, Dr. King announces that Ebenezer Baptist Church intends to provide new housing in an organized neighborhood near downtown Atlanta. Ebenezer Baptist Church also plans to develop a program with contracting firms to teach men the fundamentals of construction.

Letter from Jennings Randolph to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Jennings Randolph writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his previous telegram regarding support of the Voting Rights bill which would abolish poll taxes.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Sutton of his inability to speak at Drexel Institute for the 1965-1966 calendar year. At the time of writing, Dr. King was engaged in non-violent grass roots efforts throughout the South to end racial discrimination. His commitment to community issues would oftentimes force him to refuse public speaking engagements, among other requests.

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Letter from Phillip O. Foss to MLK

Monday, February 13, 1967

Phillip O. Foss requests permission to use excerpts from "Letter from Birmingham Jail".