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New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 15, 1964

This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.

Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. Frank Patch

Monday, January 25, 1965

Dr. King writes Reverend J. Frank Patch informing him that his schedule prevents him from accepting Patch's invitation to speak at the Baptist Union of Western Canada.

Letter from M. Carl Holman to MLK Regarding Event Invitation

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

Mr. Holman informs Dr. King he will soon receive a formal invitation to attend the Commission's National Conference on Race and Education in Washington, D.C. Mr. Holman is sending this advance notice with the hope Dr. King can fit the conference into his schedule.

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Monday, June 26, 1967

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

Letter from Mr. Ossie Davis to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Mr. Ossie Davis suggests to Dr. King that a tribute be prepared to honor the life of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois. Mr. Davis then asks Dr. King for his assistance in gaining sponsorship from "distinguished men and women."

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

The Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E. Invites MLK to Appear.

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Wallace Webster, Vice President of the Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E., writes Dr. King inviting him to appear in the Tri-City community.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

Saturday, February 18, 1967

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Letter from Mr. William A. Linsley to MLK

Wednesday, February 8, 1967

This document features a faculty member from the University of Houston conferring with Dr. King on "I Have a Dream" materials to be used for his students' curriculum.

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.

Letter from MLK to Mr. John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes Mr. Tilley, the executive director of the SCLC, after nearly being stabbed to death at a book signing in Harlem, New York. He requests that Mr. Tilley attend to several organizational and book related matters.

Letter from Edwin T. Dahlberg to Charles H. Day Regarding MLK

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

In this letter Mr. Dahlberg encourages Mr. Day to send Dr. King a personal invitation to appear in Des Moines, Iowa. The author also discusses the Washington March for Peace in Vietnam.

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Letter from Monica Wilson to Dora McDonald

Friday, March 11, 1966

Monica Wilson, from the School of African studies at the University of Cape Town, writes Dora McDonald expressing joy and excitement that Dr. King accepted the invitation to deliver the Davie Memorial Lecture. Wilson states that while King's accommodations are taken care of, the school cannot possibly pay for his aide.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 20, 1966

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee corresponds with Dora McDonald to arrange a date for Dr. King to address the committee. Shaefer provides a list of available dates from which Dr. King can select.

Letter from Mrs. Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Zabelle Tourian expresses her support for Dr. King, relaying several short statements regarding famous African American persons of recent history.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

Monday, February 12, 1968

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

King Seizure

This article reports on the seizure of a Chicago property by Dr. King.

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."