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MLK's 'People to People' Column on Education

Saturday, May 15, 1965

This article by Dr. King appeared in the New York Amsterdam News. He discusses the segregation of schools and how it is harming African American children and their opportunities.

Letter from Edward Thacker to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Edward Thacker, former State Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars for Arkansas, expresses his disagreement with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War. Thacker also contends that the eradication of poverty is an unrealistic goal.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Letter from Margaret & Richard Dodge to MLK

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Margaret and Richard Dodge inform Dr. King of a successful fundraiser they hosted and enclose the profits to help Dr. King in the civil rights movement.

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Letter from Mr. Weston to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Mr. Weston writes Dr. King offering him advice regarding the Civil Rights Movement and how to seek peace between whites and blacks.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

Marx

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from E.M. Fruchter to MLK regarding Moulin Rouge Resort Motel

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this letter to King, dated December 13, 1966, Fruchter informs King that reservations were made for him at the Moulin Rouge Resort Motel in Miami Beach, FL by Henry Arrington.

Program for MLK's Baccalaureate Commencement

Sunday, June 7, 1959

This program is from Dr. King's Baccalaureate Commencement at Boston University.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Grace M. Meade to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 18, 1968

This message from Grace Meade to Ralph Abernathy relates the details of a Seattle, Washington funeral service conducted for Dr. King.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from Melvin D. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Melvin D. Kennedy, Editor at Morehouse College, writes Dr. King about the book, "Perspectives in Freedom and Progress, 1863-1963: An appraisal of the Negro's First Hundred Years of Freedom." He explains that the book is a non-profit venture that will add to the Negro narrative and highlight Negro accomplishments. He goes on to request that Dr. King contribute a chapter about the Negro's fight for freedom.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Index Card with Dr.King's Handwritten Philosophy Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines insights on pantheism and references philosophers Goethe, Spinoza, and Rousseau. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Brutality in Mississippi

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Letter from Raphael Demos to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Professor Demos commends Dr. King on his statement in "Christianity and Crisis" and inquires whether Dr. King was a student of his at Harvard. Demos also expresses his views on race relations in the South.

Affidavit of Cleopatra Kennedy

Monday, April 15, 1963

After being arrested in Birmingham for "parading without a permit" in 1963, Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights singer Cleopatra Kennedy gave this notarized affidavit describing the incident.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Invitation from the United Federation of Teachers to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

The United Federation of Teachers invite Dr. King to their annual Spring Conference Luncheon. At this particular event, civil rights activist Bayard Rustin will be honored with the John Dewey Award.

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.