The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

Letter from Eugene Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Eugene Patterson thanks Dr. King for the congratulatory letter in which Dr. King clarified his position on Vietnam. Patterson also asks Dr. King to suggest a time for them to meet to discuss the Civil Rights Movement and Vietnam.


Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

Thursday, June 27, 1963

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

Telegram from MLK and Joseph Lowery to William Anderson

Joseph E. Lowery and Dr. King addressed this telegram to William Anderson asking him to attend a SCLC board meeting regarding the Poor People's Campaign.

Original Sin

Dr. King records his views regarding the doctrine of original sin.


Dr. King quotes St. Thomas Aquinas on the concept of God.

Letter from Luther Hodges to MLK Regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Luther Hodges, sent this letter to Dr. King on the eve of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He writes that he, King, and President Johnson share enthusiasm over the bill and are positive for the future of America. Hodges asks for Dr. King's continued aid in leading the nation to comply with the bill and, in the words of President Johnson, "eliminate the final strongholds of intolerance and hatred."

Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

Thursday, June 18, 1964

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Press Release from the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Sunday, January 15, 1967

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty releases a letter to President Johnson signed by numerous civil rights, labor, religious and community action groups calling for him to take leadership in the War on Poverty by increasing funding. The press release also announces a January 26 national meeting in Washington, D.C. to discuss the War on Poverty.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Letter from Victor Seidel to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Victor M. Seidel requests a copy of Dr. King's lecture that was delivered at the University of Texas entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

Telegram from SCLC to NAACP Convention

Tuesday, July 3, 1962

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference welcomes Roy Wilkins to Atlanta. They also express their hope that the laborers of the NAACP convenetion will help bring about equality.

Letter from Representative Carl Perkins to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Carl Perkins informs Dr. King that he supports fighting against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.

Letter from Winthrop Steele to MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Winthrop Steele writes Dr. King asserting that he was a supporter and fan of Dr. King and his civil rights doctrine until his recent remarks about the Vietnam War. Steele advises Dr. King to take a sabbatical, reexamine his views, and focus on civil rights.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Letter from James Shaffer and James Barfield

Friday, July 29, 1966

Mr. Shaffer and Mr. Barfield both thank Dr. King and the SCLC for thier works for humanity.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Telegram from George W. Baber and John W. P. Collier to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

The African Methodist Episcopal Churches in New Jersey express their pleasure that Dr. King is making a "speedy recovery."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Herman Strase

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Strase position on justice for all. More specifically, he praises Strase for his written sentiments concerning apartheid policies of the Union of South Africa government.

Highlander Center Press Release

This press release details the Highlander Center, an adult education center for people who come to learn how to deal with problems affecting their lives and communities, which was under investigation. The investigation was being conducted to determine if the Highland Center was integrated as stated in its charter.