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"PUERTO RICO"

400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

Dr. King describes the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference involvement in the civil rights campaign, May-July of 1964, in St. Augustine, Florida. The excerpted article is taken from the SCLC Newsletter.

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Letter to MLK Regarding the Draft Law

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Dr. King receives an anonymous letter regarding the revision of Draft Law. The author states that the July 1, 1967 revision of the law allows regulations that further burden the military service to lower income groups, specifically Negroes, instead of requiring that Military service be spread more equally. The author encloses the State Memorandum No. 6-21, which was issued by the Illinois State Director of Selective Service on July 19, 1967.

Letter from Mr. Joseph Mermel to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 18, 1965

In this letter to Mrs. King, Mr. Mermel informs her that a sculptress, Sally Stengel, would like to make a sculpture of Dr. King, given he is one of "two outstanding leaders of the Negro race."

Letter from Clyde De L. Ryals to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Clyde De L. Ryals shares the perspective of his white counterparts in Georgia in congratulating Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Eisenhower Campbell to MLK

Thursday, September 3, 1964

The Methodist Youth Fellowship of Philadelphia extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Rally in early 1965. The officers of the fellowship also request the address of Reverends Walter Fauntroy and Wyatt Walker of SCLC.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Letter from Jan Helge Jansen to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

The Norwegian Student Association invites Dr. King to speak at one of their meetings and suggest the topic of his lecture be human rights and freedom.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from MLK to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller

Friday, September 14, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King writes to New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller to express his gratitude for the Governor's letter and copy of his new book. Dr. King also refers to the possibility of Gov. Rockefeller's making "a large contribution to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights," and writes extensively about the Society and the effect such a contribution would have.

Western Union Telegram from Willie Bascomb to Dr. King

Wednesday, September 24, 1958

Willie Bascomb, of Montgomery, Alabama, addressed this telegram to Dr. King, wishing him a full recovery and well wishes.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Rev. P.A. Berry Invites MLK to England

Friday, June 9, 1967

Rev. Quinland R. Gordon informs Dr. King of a recent letter sent to him by Rev. P. A. Berry. Father Berry is interested in securing Dr. King as a guest speaker at his Cathedral in England on Sunday November 12, 1967.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Telegram from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

A. Phillip Randolph, on behalf of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and the Negro American Labor Council, expresses joy at Dr. King's release from prison.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Request For Information Sent to MLK from Abram Eisenman

This second "Request For Information" was sent from Abram Eisenman to Dr. King. He asks Dr. King if he and members of his organization will support him for president. He gives Dr. King five main points of his platform that he hopes to achieve as president. He believes it is "imperative" that someone run against President Johnson and unite the American people based on his platform.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, April 17, 1967

J.Campe encloses payment from The Critic for "Where Do We Go From Here" permission fees.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.