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"PUERTO RICO"

Birthday Card to MLK

Thursday, January 15, 1959

Elaine Stears and Family wish Dr. King a Happy Birthday.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Charles Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Charles Williams thanks Dr. King for sending him an autograph.

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from E.E.H. to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

The author of this letter speaks out against the efforts of Reverend Abernathy, calling the March on Washington a cheap show and calling for an end to civil rights demonstrations in general.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to William H. Oliver

Saturday, May 8, 1965

Ralph Abernathy informs Mr. Oliver that emergencies will prevent him from meeting the week of May 14th, and asks to reschedule for a later date.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

First Congregational Church Program

Dr. King is listed to speak at an evening church service entitled, "The Immorality of Racial Segregation."

Letter from Roy T. Poorman to Philadelphia Tribune Editor

Monday, July 12, 1965

Roy T. Poorman writes the editor of the Philadelphia Tribune regarding an article by Morris I. Liebman that opposed "negro civil rights protest demonstrations." Poorman identifies Liebman as a person of Jewish descent and compares the techniques of Dr. King to Biblical leader Moses. Poorman also discusses the lack of action by Jews in America or Germany prior to the genocide of 6,000,000 Jews along with the recent discrimination of the Jewish people in other countries. He writes in support of Dr. King's approach.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

Friday, October 1, 1965

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Pride

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Letter to SCLC from Preston Warren

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Bucknell University Department of Philosophy Chairman Preston Warren, a supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, reduces his usual $5 contribution to $1 because of his disagreements with Dr. King's stance against the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Herman Schuchman to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Herman Schuchman writes Dr. King on behalf of the American Orthopsychiatric Association to invite him to their annual meetings in the spring of 1968. The association is interested in presenting a program that involves the issues of war, civil rights and human rights. They request Dr. King share his intellect and experiences surrounding the civil rights issues in the United States.

Flyer Advertising SCLC Benefit

Harry Belafonte and his "entire company" host a full evening of entertainment for an SCLC benefit.

Letter from William M. Grayson to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1962

William M. Grayson, the President of the local NAACP chapter in West Virginia, requests the help of Dr. King to assist the organization in gaining more members. Grayson asks that Dr. King provide a schedule and availability for when he could possibly provide aid.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Birthday Card from Isaac Stotts to MLK

Isaac Stotts sends birthday wishes to Dr. King on his 39th birthday.

Norwegian Peace Initiative

Friday, January 6, 1967

Five Norwegians concerned about the Vietnam conflict propose that winners of the Nobel Peace Prize form a negotiating delegation to visit the US and Hanoi governments.

Letter from Sharyl Green to MLK

Saturday, November 9, 1963

Sharyl Green, a junior at Roosevelt School in Michigan, expresses her admiration for Dr. King's work and inquires if Dr. King could send her his biography. Green also shares a piece of her literary work with Dr. King.