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"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

New York, NY, Chicago, IL

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), New York (NY)

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, April 24, 1964
New York, NY, GERMANY

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the German publishing house's request for a personalized forward for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Telegram from Coretta Scott King to the Family of Dr. Thomas Merton

Tuesday, December 17, 1968
Louisville, KY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King writes to the family of Dr. Thomas Merton expressing her condolences regarding his death. She explains that the tribute Dr. Merton paid to her late husband will never be forgotten and urges the family to remember that the spiritual bonds that exist between a family is eternal.

God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Wrestle of Religion with Truth" on man's need to adjust himself to events.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966
New York, NY

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

Radio Sermons Listing

Under the title "Radio Sermons," is a listing of sermon titles and dates given by Dr. King.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Tallahassee, FL, North Carolina (NC), Pittsburgh, PA, Illinois (IL), Los Angeles, CA, Philadelphia, PA, Texas (TX), Columbus, OH, Michigan (MI)

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Fund Raiser Event for the SCLC

Connecticut (CT)

Mrs. Richard Gile expresses her admiration to Dr. King for his work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The La Fleurs Garden Club wishes to sponsor a Benefit Freedom Tea event to raise money for the SCLC.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. M. Lawson Jr.

Friday, October 25, 1963
Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Rev. Lawson to express his appreciation for the financial contribution to the SCLC from Protestant missionaries. Dr. King states that they will seek to make sure that a student involved in a recent tragedy in Birmingham, Alabama benefits from the contribution.

Letter from Pierre Servais to MLK and Joan Daves

Tuesday, November 10, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, BELGIUM

Pierre Servais writes to Dr. King on behalf of the publishing company that will soon be translating "Strength To Love" in French. Servais would like to know, among other things, if Dr. King will be able to make a stop in Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe. Servais would like to hear from Dr. King as soon as possible concerning a meeting because he would like to launch the French version of "Strength To Love", while Dr. King is in Europe.

SCLC Newsletter: Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany

Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL)

In this newsletter, SCLC announces integration in Albany, GA and believes that the city will soon face the legal death of segregation. They also inform readers of the arrest of SCLC Petersburg President, David Gunter.

Thank you letter from George R. Metcalf to MLK

Thursday, October 5, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Metcalf, president of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, thanks Dr. King for joining the Advisory Council. Mr. Metcalf expresses his belief that Dr. King's participation on the council "will greatly strengthen the National Committee in its efforts to attain equal opportunity in housing."

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS)

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Press Release Regarding President Kennedy's Involvement in the Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Little Rock, AR

Dr. King repeatedly called on the support of the White House in the struggles toward civil rights. In this press release, he addresses the negotiation process in Albany, Georgia and expresses his gratitude for President Kennedy's involvement.

MLK Requests Contributions

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.

Sacrifice

Dr. King cites passages from Leviticus that suggest that the smell of sacrifice is pleasing to God.

Report to Agenda Committee

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Letter from Philip Hart to Mr. Glen E. Aldrich

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Senator Philip Hart comments on the First Amendment and Dr. King's future march.

Letter from Edward W. Brooke to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Senator Edward W. Brooke offers his gratitude to Dr. King, for his support of the current civil rights bill.

Letter to MLK from Alfred E.Field

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Indiana (IN)

Mr. Field, President, Indiana Memorial Union Board of Directors, writes to inform Dr. King that IMU will act as the local sponsor for TIME Magazine's National Presidential Primary, Choice 68, on April 24th. Ironically, the letter is dated April 3,1968 which is one day prior to his tragic end.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Chicago, IL

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Letter from Sharon Judith Bresler to SCLC

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Sharon Bresler encloses a check to the SCLC and requests that they write Rabbi Sanford Shopero from the Congregation of Temple Emmanuel to inform him that the gift was made in his honor.

MLK's Statement to SCLC Describing SCOPE

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Louisville, KY, Memphis, TN, Nashville, TN

In this statement, Dr. King describes the Summer Community Organization and Political Education (SCOPE), an initiative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Its goals are to train local leaders, inform the public, and register individuals to vote.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
California (CA), Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Arizona (AZ), Maryland (MD), Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA, Atlantic City, NJ, Texas (TX), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Los Angeles, CA, Tennessee (TN), GERMANY, CONGO / ZAIRE, AUSTRALIA

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.