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"Pennsylvania (PA)"

Letter from Alice Parham to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Ms. Palhom writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph and personal information about him for her government class.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Letter from Harry Wunsch to MLK

Harry Wunsch encloses a contribution to support Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Peace of Mind

Dr. King quotes Marcus Aurelius about peace of mind.

You and the Poor People's Campaign

This document contains detailed information regarding the Poor People's Campaign. This document also discusses the Satyagraha movement, a nonviolent movement that means "truth force."

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Letter from Irene Zimmerman to MLK

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Miss Zimmerman expresses disapproval in Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Telegram from Gitta Gossmann to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Gossmann sends Dr. King a royalty check for his book "Why We Can't Wait" in the amount of $3,448.76.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Article Regarding Harry Belafonte and Associates Denied Service

Friday, June 1, 1962

This article states, Harry Belafonte and associates were denied lunch service at the King's Inn Restaurant. Dr. King issued a statement that no action will be taken at the present time, due to the loss of several distinguished leaders in a recent air disaster.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

SCLC News Release

Saturday, February 26, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release relays news of the successful "Crawfordville Enterprises" business venture, one which has brought hope to the rural Negroes of Taliaferro County as a combined initiative of the SCLC and cooperating sister organizations.

MLK's Funeral Procession Outline

This document outlines the funeral procession of Dr. King and specifies how many people wide the procession will be.

Postcard from Westmont College Library to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

The library at Westmont College thanks Dr. King for sending pamphlets and other literature about the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Roberta Evans

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Evans for her kind gesture in sending a letter enclosed with a book by Will Campbell. Dr. King believes his views on race will be a benefit to him.

Letter from Ronald V. Wells to Crozer Theological Seminary Alumnus

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Ronald V. Wells, President of Crozer Theological Seminary sends an invitation to the alumni of Crozer Theological Seminary, requesting their presence at the annual Centennial Celebration. Enclosed with the letter is a list of several conveniently located hotels in the area as well as a voting sheet.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

God in Isaiah

Dr. King cites Isaiah 55: 8,9 on the holiness and transcendence of God and distinguishes this from an anthropomorphic view of God.

The Minority Can Afford Adequate Housing

Mr. Borden writes to inform readers of the housing inequalities in Dade County. Borden ultimately explains that the problem extends from not a singular reason, but from a mixture of social and economic ills. He believes that if the focus was shifted from building expensive commercial buildings to investing in ordinary neighborhoods, there would be significant improvement. This also serves as a call to action for those who agree with the information to mail it to their representatives in Congress.

Letter from MLK to Joseph White

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Dr. White's contribution to the SCLC and apologizes for the delay of response that was due to a high volume of other calls and letters.