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Letter from MLK to Mrs. Vincent

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude, to Mrs. Vincent and the Millinery Workers Union, for their support and hard work towards the SCLC.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Draft Law

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Dr. King receives an anonymous letter regarding the revision of Draft Law. The author states that the July 1, 1967 revision of the law allows regulations that further burden the military service to lower income groups, specifically Negroes, instead of requiring that Military service be spread more equally. The author encloses the State Memorandum No. 6-21, which was issued by the Illinois State Director of Selective Service on July 19, 1967.

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Advertisement Order Form

This letter serves as an order form for advertisement in a booklet commemorating the SCLC's ten-year anniversary.

Letter to Baron Allard from Mrs. King

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Mrs. King writes to Baron Allard to thank him for the time she spent in Belgium. She thanks him for the gifts he sent for her loved ones and extends an invitation to visit when he travels to Atlanta.

Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Letter from MLK to Eugene Saunders

Tuesday, April 3, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation from Eugene Saunders to speak in Virginia for the Central Civic Forum. He refers Mr. Saunders to Jack O'Dell for voter registration literature.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

American Negro Concert Pianist Undertakes 100 Cites Tour in Support of Haiti's Pan American Festival of the New World

Ambassador Bonhomme announces the Pan American Festival of the New World, proposed and implemented by Negro-American Concert Pianist Robert Pritchard. The festival's inauguration was held in Haiti in the summer of 1969. The event attracted students in the "Pan American hemisphere." The festival's main features focused on the establishment of three summer schools.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

Vote No on State Question 409 – Oklahoma NAACP

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders state their opinions regarding ballot question 409, the "right to work" law. All of the civil rights leaders encourage Negro readers to vote against passing his law because it will not benefit the Negro worker.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Man

Dr. King records geologist Robert Gheyselinck’s observation about the brevity of human history in relation to the earth’s history

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Letter from Alan J. Rankin to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, January 23, 1967

Dr. King informs Alan J. Rankin to communicate to Dora McDonald about his availability to speak at the University Christian Council of McMaster University. The theme of the discussion for the "Teach-In" is going to be "The Religious Dilemma of Twentieth Century Man." Mr. Rankin expects over 2,000 students in attendance and church people from Canada. Furthermore, Mr. Rankin asserts that there will be news coverage on this event.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Johann R. Goelz

Friday, August 16, 1963

Dr. King writes Johann Goelz expressing his appreciation for the kind remarks shared in a previous correspondence. King hopes that the current work in Birmingham will yield a success that sets the tone for better race relations in the South.

Meeting on National Negro Politics

Sunday, March 31, 1968

The Meeting on National Negro Politics highlights congressional races with "the most potential for political gains by black Americans" in the 1968 elections.

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

Letter from Robert T. Bowen to MLK

Sunday, January 14, 1968

In this letter, Mr. Bowen requests the assistance of Dr. King in establishing a black nation outside of the United States.

Letter from MLK to Paul Madsen

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King informs Reverend Paul O. Madsen that he does not have availability to work for the Home Missions Societies of the American Baptist Convention because he is very busy with the civil rights struggle.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Beverly A. Asbury

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

In this letter Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rev. Beverly Asbury for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He stresses the importance of supporters' contributions in order to successfully continue the initiative toward unity, justice, and equality.

Letter from Sam Aluko to MLK

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Sam Aluko writes Dr. King requesting him to contribute to the National Relief Fund, which assists displaced people in Nigeria.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

The Time for Freedom Has Come

Dr. King discusses the evolution of Negro students partcipating in the movement. This article was published by in the New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.