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"Pennsylvania (PA)"

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

Letter from Mercedes L. Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Pennsylvania (PA)

Nine year old Mercedes Lynne Johnson writes Mrs. King to offer her condolences and prayers following the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Dorothy L. Shereff to MLK Regarding a Book on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dorothy Shereff, Rights and Permissions Manager for The New American Library, requests that Dr. King send a statement to promote Professor Louis Fischer's book on Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from MLK to E. C. Smith

Wednesday, December 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Smith's invitation to speak at Metropolitan Baptist Church and apologizes for his tardy response. Dr. King discusses the "People-To-People" tour of the south and declines the invitation due to his busy schedule.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

GHANA, ISRAEL

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Letter from E.M. Fruchter to MLK regarding Moulin Rouge Resort Motel

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
Florida (FL)

In this letter to King, dated December 13, 1966, Fruchter informs King that reservations were made for him at the Moulin Rouge Resort Motel in Miami Beach, FL by Henry Arrington.

Letter from James Scheuer to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

In this letter to Dr. King, Congressman Scheuer asks Dr. King to testify at a hearing of the Select Subcommittee on Labor of the House Committee on Education and Labor about House Resolution 12962. This bill focused on creating a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

God

Dr. King cites and comments on a passage from I Chronicles about the gods that are idols.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA, INDIA, New York (NY)

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966
California (CA)

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

Statement by MLK

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Hampshire (NH), GERMANY

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from Rev. Michael Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967
Michigan (MI), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Rev. Michael Hamilton informs Dr. King that the book "The Viet Nam War - Christian Perspectives", which includes Dr. King's address on Vietnam, has just been published. Hamilton also notifies Dr. King of publicity plans and expresses gratitude for his contribution.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
SWEDEN

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Milwaukee, WI

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Memo from Harry Boyte to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Mr. Boyte asks Dr. King to review the document "ACTION FOR DEMOCRACY." He also attaches two tables for his review.

God

Dr. King references a quote from Proverbs regarding creation and God's wisdom.

Letter from MLK to Winifred Menehart

Monday, January 8, 1968
Minnesota (MN)

In this document, Dr. King is truly appreciative of the encouraging letter he received from Mrs. Winfred Menehart, a native of Minnesota. Dr. King emphasizes on the positivity that rests within her letter, as a facet of hope, amid the contrasting assaults and criticisms he receives daily.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Saturday, February 25, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

Crozer Theological Seminary Brochure

Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This brochure provides information about Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. The brochure lists full details of the campus, programs of study, and admissions.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter From Octavia Wynbush Strong to MLK

Saturday, February 13, 1965
Missouri (MO)

Mrs. Strong offers Dr. King a copy of her play "Listen, America," with hopes that he might use it in his "wonderful work."

Jesus

Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Letter from MLK to W. D. Mason

Tuesday, January 16, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in support of the Mercer County Branch of the NAACP in Farrell, Pennsylvania. He expresses his appreciation for the invitation but explains that he has accepted his maximum number of speaking engagements for the spring.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.