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"Philadelphia, MS"

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

The Method of Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical thought that attempts to understand the unparalleled identity of human's in relation to nature. Dr. King references this ideology with a handwritten note.

Letter From MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965
FRANCE

Dr. King thanks Pastor Westphal for the opportunity to address the French Protestant Federation.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Morehouse College's Standing Among 192 Colleges

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This document ranks Morehouse College against other colleges in a variety of areas, including endowment, number of Ph.D's on the faculty, and graduates with Ph.D's.

A Tribute to the MLK

Monday, November 30, 1964
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Several organizations in Stamford, Connecticut sponsor a tribute in honor of Dr. King. This document outlines the program participants, and lists Dr. King as providing the keynote address.

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Memo from Alan Geyer to Readers of Vietnam Packet

New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A letter from the Council for Christian Social Action discusses the distribution of a packet containing materials concerned with the Vietnam War. The results of the packet are strong moral and political judgments about the war.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein

Monday, January 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King sends thanks to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein for a contribution made to the SCLC.

Letter from Dr. Mircea Tanasescu to MLK

California (CA), MEXICO, PANAMA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, San Francisco, CA, ROMANIA

Dr. Tanasescu asks Dr. King to help him receive permission from the Romanian government, so that his family may enter the United States.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Saturday, January 22, 1966
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), MEXICO, VIETNAM

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

Buddhism

Dr. King quotes James Bissett Pratt's "The Religious Consciousness: A Psychological Study."

Theory of Perception in the Light of the Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead's "fallacy of misplaced concreteness" as described in "Science and the Modern World."

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Letter from Reverend William D.F. Morris to MLK

Sunday, December 20, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. William D. F. Morris, of Centennial United Church in Toronto, invites Dr. King to visit his church during Lent.

Race

Dr. King references quotations from George-Louis Leclerc (Comte de Buffon) and Jean-Baptiste Lamarck concerning the creation of racial identification.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 18, 1965
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Friday, September 23, 1966
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

Miss Dora McDonald writes Dr. Fiers regarding Dr. King's visit to Dallas, Texas.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965
New York (NY), CHINA

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Letter from S.Leiss to MLK Regarding Dutch Publication Rights

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

S. Leiss sent Dr King this satement regarding a payment for the Dutch rights to "Why We Can't Wait".

Statement from Grace H. Giles

Baltimore, MD

Grace H. Giles writes Reverend Ralph Abernathy and requests that he share a vision with her. She also includes several meaningful words and acronyms that she created.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Watts

Monday, January 15, 1968
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Watts for taking the time to express his support for King's efforts.

Letter from MLK to Walter Everett

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Walter Everett regarding the libel cases of Rev. Abernathy, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Lowery and Rev. Seay. He thanks Mr. Everett for his support and informs him that they are "winning the victory" with his help.

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.