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Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

Letter from Irving Engel to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Dr. King has been invited to visit Israel. While they are delighted to have him, because of the demands of the Civil Rights Movement, it is suggested that he make this visit while he is at the meeting of the Organization of African Unity in Ghana in order to be considerate of his time.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Dr. King's secretary sends Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway. The trip is associated with Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize.

MLK Memo on the Civil Rights Bill

Dr. King initialed this memo praising the passage of the civil rights bill. The memo points out that its passage is a "bright interlude" in the struggle for civil rights.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Emergency Rally--Walk with Dr. Spock for Peace in Vietnam

The following document is promoting a rally for peace in Vietnam. Dr. Benjamin Spock, among others, is scheduled to speak at the rally.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966

Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Man

Dr. King quotes Nobel Literature Prize winner William Faulkner on the prospects for man.

Financial Breakdown of Individual Contributors

Dr. King lists the monetary calculations of those who have individually contributed to the "Souvenir Program."

The Blame in Birmingham

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter from Christine Schulty to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Christine Schulty offers condolences to Mrs. King after the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, January 14, 1967

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

Letter from Bengt Bjerke to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Bengt Bjerke from the Legal Counsel of the Nobel Foundation informs Dora McDonald that a signature is needed for Dr. King's copyright assignment form for his Nobel Lecture.

Letter from MLK to Dr. & Mrs. Bacon

Friday, October 17, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. and Mrs. Bacon for their kind donation of $200 sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Telegram from MLK to Mattie Tillman

Dr. King expresses his condolences to Mattie Tillman for the death of her husband. Dr. King states that he will always be remembered for his influence in the Atlanta University community.

Letter from Albert Duff, Jr. to MLK

A former critic of Dr. King pledges allegiance to him after his bold and noble stance against the Vietnam War. Albert Duff, Jr. finally understands that color lines should not be a symbol of divisiveness. Duff feels that the world needs men of Dr. King's courage to speak from the Bible.

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Invitation from Earl S. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Earl S. Smith invites Dr. King to speak at Montevideo, Uruguay on the methods of nonviolence in Latin America.

Ritschl

Dr. King outlines Albrecht Ritschl's views on the church, theology and philosophy.

Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Religion and Peace of Soul

Dr. King cites a quotation from Jesus Christ that discusses peace, the "chief legacy" of religion. Dr. King explains that inner peace is maintained regardless of the external adversity one endures in life. Dr. King continues to elaborate on the necessary functional relationship one must have with God. He further describes the association between good, evil, innocence and more.

Social Gospel

Dr. King describes the period of the social gospel.

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."